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Louis Pepe

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July 11, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
He can't drive. He can't tie his shoes. He can't count past 11 or remember your name. He lives next to the Brighton Beach boardwalk and can smell the salty summer air, but he must strain to see the ocean. His left eye is gone; sight in the other is half what it was. He gets by on a wheelchair and a walker. A stroke during his recovery left his right side all but useless, his hand permanently twisted. Because he can't read, at night he turns on the television, to a music channel.
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NATIONAL
July 11, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
He can't drive. He can't tie his shoes. He can't count past 11 or remember your name. He lives next to the Brighton Beach boardwalk and can smell the salty summer air, but he must strain to see the ocean. His left eye is gone; sight in the other is half what it was. He gets by on a wheelchair and a walker. A stroke during his recovery left his right side all but useless, his hand permanently twisted. Because he can't read, at night he turns on the television, to a music channel.
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OPINION
December 18, 2005
Re "Can 'Brokeback Mountain' Move the Heartland?" Dec. 14 Did the writers even see the movie? There are more heterosexual sex scenes in this movie than homosexual ones. There are several scenes with women's breasts exposed. There even is heterosexual sex between unmarried people in the back seat of a car. The profoundly sad and moving nature of the film is what will challenge viewers, not the fact that two men are in love. This is not a political movie. The fact that The Times ran a story on the film with reviews from the Family Research Council is sad. Stop inventing controversy about this great film.
OPINION
December 18, 2005
Re "Can 'Brokeback Mountain' Move the Heartland?" Dec. 14 Did the writers even see the movie? There are more heterosexual sex scenes in this movie than homosexual ones. There are several scenes with women's breasts exposed. There even is heterosexual sex between unmarried people in the back seat of a car. The profoundly sad and moving nature of the film is what will challenge viewers, not the fact that two men are in love. This is not a political movie. The fact that The Times ran a story on the film with reviews from the Family Research Council is sad. Stop inventing controversy about this great film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
Terry Gilliam, the maverick director responsible for such off-center films as "Time Bandits," "12 Monkeys" and "Brazil," met his match when he tackled Cervantes' Don Quixote. His 10-year battle to bring the character to the screen became an obsession -- one he was forced to suspend when his $32-million production had the plug pulled by the insurance company in October 2000 after just six days of shooting. Chronicling the film's decline and fall were documentarians Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe, brought in to track the evolution of the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a certain inevitable logic that Terry Gilliam would attempt to make a film based on Cervantes' 17th century novel "Don Quixote." He is, after all, one of the most quixotic of directors. Visionary, impulsive and unpredictable, Gilliam, 61, is a man who chooses to dream the impossible dream.
OPINION
July 16, 2006
Re "First to Fall, First Forgotten," Column One, July 11 Although it is sad that Louis Pepe is severely injured, he is in no way a terrorist casualty in the way that the victims of 9/11 were. As a prison guard, he was performing his normal, everyday duties. If the prisoners who attacked him were members of a white, black, Latino, Irish, Russian or any other type of gang, the only story here would be of a badly injured prison guard living a difficult life. He is cared for by his former employer with a continuing income, medical benefits and apparently other special considerations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Standing in the midst of pre-production hell for his dream film, "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote," filmmaker Terry Gilliam looked around and summed it up. "There is," he said, an actual gleam in his eye, "a lot of potential for chaos here." "Lost in La Mancha," the essential new documentary about the collapse of Gilliam's most cherished project, records that chaos and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The gothic allure of the opening images hooks you immediately. Here's Jonathan Pryce, somberly attired, flipping through yellowed photos of conjoined fetuses as a car delivers him to some remote, wind-swept edge of England. Stepping out of the car, he sinks in the mire and is startled by a squawking crow. The clapboard and "Cut!" come as a surprise, as does the shift to director Ken Russell, sitting in a study somewhere, talking about his never-finished biopic, "Two-Way Romeo."
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An electrical engineer who prosecutors say is a confidant of Osama bin Laden's and a founding member of the Al Qaeda terrorist group pleaded guilty Wednesday to attempted murder in the stabbing of a federal prison guard. Government lawyers said the attack was part of a plot to take hostages at the high-security unit of the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
Terry Gilliam, the maverick director responsible for such off-center films as "Time Bandits," "12 Monkeys" and "Brazil," met his match when he tackled Cervantes' Don Quixote. His 10-year battle to bring the character to the screen became an obsession -- one he was forced to suspend when his $32-million production had the plug pulled by the insurance company in October 2000 after just six days of shooting. Chronicling the film's decline and fall were documentarians Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe, brought in to track the evolution of the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2002 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a certain inevitable logic that Terry Gilliam would attempt to make a film based on Cervantes' 17th century novel "Don Quixote." He is, after all, one of the most quixotic of directors. Visionary, impulsive and unpredictable, Gilliam, 61, is a man who chooses to dream the impossible dream.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | Richard Cromelin and Kevin Crust
Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony. Recounts the role of freedom songs in South Africa's fight against apartheid. Directed by Lee Hirsch. Artisan, Feb. 7 Blossoms of Fire. Maureen Gosling's film illuminates the colorful culture of Mexico's Isthmus Zapotecs, known for their work ethic and powerful matriarchy. New Yorker Films, July A Decade Under the Influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2000
THURSDAY 8pm & 9:30 pm Jazz No grinches allowed at the Jazz Bakery, where the sets by Cyrus Chestnut and his trio will include songs from his latest album, the pianist's take on the classic work by Vince Guaraldi, "A Charlie Brown Christmas." See Review, Page 41. The Cyrus Chestnut Trio, the Jazz Bakery, 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City, today-Sunday at 8 and 9:30 p.m. $22. (310) 271-9039.
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