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Louis Reichman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1995
Tustin was named for Columbus Tustin, a successful gold miner who bought 1,300 acres near the city's center. Hoping that the area would be a major rail stop between Los Angeles and San Juan Capistrano, Tustin offered free land to anyone who would build a home on it. But Southern Pacific Railroad Co. chose Santa Ana instead. Source: "The Orange County Experience" by Louis Reichman and Gary Cardinale
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1995
Fullerton, which was incorporated in 1904, was named in honor of George H. Fullerton, who successfully pushed for the Los Angeles-San Diego arm of the Santa Fe Railroad to come through the city. During World War I, Fullerton was an important railroad shipping area. At one time it also boasted the world's largest orange grove. Source: "The Orange County Experience" by Louis Reichman and Gary Cardinale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995
San Clemente was founded in 1928 by Ole Hanson, an oil and land promoter and ex-mayor of Seattle. Hanson teamed up with H.H. Cotton of Los Angeles to build a "Spanish mission by the sea." But they couldn't make the mortgage payments and lost the property. Years later, President Richard Nixon bought it for his Western White House. Source: "The Orange County Experience" by Louis Reichman and Gary Cardinale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995
Orange, which was incorporated in 1888, traces its roots to 1869, when lawyers Alfred Beck Chapman and Andrew Glassell accepted 1,385 acres of land as payment for legal fees. Chapman Avenue and Glassell Street, named for them, now intersect at the symbolic center of Orange: Plaza Square Park. Source: "The Orange County Experience" by Louis Reichman and Gary Cardinale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
"The Orange County Experience," a history of the county written by Fullerton College instructor Louis C. Reichman, has become part of the curriculum of the Garden Grove Unified School District. Reichman donated 250 copies of his 232-page book to the district, making it possible for educators to comply with a state mandate that all third graders learn local and regional history, school officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1985 | DAN NAKASO, Times Staff Writer
Class was in session, and Prof. Louis Reichman had an attentive audience. On the left, the history teacher-turned tour guide said, was the Newport Beach hotel where Martha Mitchell revealed many of the secrets of Watergate. Over there on the right was Upper Newport Bay, where "there's some pretty nasty things that shouldn't be put in the water," he said, referring to increased pollution in the bay.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The group from New Jersey had heard about Californians and their zany lifestyles, so they were prepared for anything . . . except a floating greeting card that came out of an airplane with a sky diver attached. When someone yelled, "Hey, lookit the airplane!" hundreds of heads tilted back, their eyes scanning the skies above. As someone counted down, the parachutist jumped out of the plane and descended toward one of the terraces at the Dana Point Resort.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer and
When a newspaper story announcing the publication of the first edition of "The Orange County Experience" appeared two years ago, Roger LeRoque was on vacation in Finland. As publisher and editor of the book that chronicles the colorful history and changing face of Orange County from the Indian days to the present, LeRoque had no idea his office in Temple City would be inundated with letters from people requesting a copy.
NEWS
July 28, 1987 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer(
Crossing the parking lot of the La Quinta Inn, a new hotel created out of the hexagonal silos of East Irvine's historic granary, Louis Reichman paused to look at an old wooden water tower. Legend has it that a lynching occurred on a tree that once stood next to the tower, he said. The tall, gray-thatched Fullerton College history professor continued walking, stopping in front of three weather-beaten buildings resting on blocks behind a chain-link fence.
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