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BUSINESS
November 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford's Chief Technical Officer to Retire: Louis Ross, who also serves as vice chairman, plans to retire at the end of the year. Ross, a director since 1985, also will give up his Ford Motor Co. board seat. "He is not expected to be replaced with an internal director," Ford spokesman John Harmon said. The nation's second-largest auto maker will either fill his seat with an outsider or not replace him at all. Including Ross, Ford currently has three employees on its 15-member board of directors.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford's Chief Technical Officer to Retire: Louis Ross, who also serves as vice chairman, plans to retire at the end of the year. Ross, a director since 1985, also will give up his Ford Motor Co. board seat. "He is not expected to be replaced with an internal director," Ford spokesman John Harmon said. The nation's second-largest auto maker will either fill his seat with an outsider or not replace him at all. Including Ross, Ford currently has three employees on its 15-member board of directors.
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BUSINESS
November 13, 1992
In response to a letter from Sara B. Drescher (Nov. 5), let me assure Ms. Drescher that physicians and hospitals are not "exempt from criticism." Newspapers seem to print more letters critical of health care providers than in praise of them. Drescher's main concern, however, was with a near $14,000 total bill for a cataract operation. I sympathize with her because that sounds like a lot of money for an outpatient procedure.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1992
In response to a letter from Sara B. Drescher (Nov. 5), let me assure Ms. Drescher that physicians and hospitals are not "exempt from criticism." Newspapers seem to print more letters critical of health care providers than in praise of them. Drescher's main concern, however, was with a near $14,000 total bill for a cataract operation. I sympathize with her because that sounds like a lot of money for an outpatient procedure.
NEWS
April 9, 1989
Your staff writer Garry Abrams' work, "Shadows on the Legend," (March 24), commenting on Charles Higham and Roy Moseley's book, "Cary Grant: The Lonely Heart"--a malicious biography--clearly shows the extremes to which some writers are willing to arrive for money and attention. To suggest or affirm--without substantiated or irrevocable facts and evidence--that two of Hollywood's most prominent symbols of virility, Cary Grant and Randolph Scott, had vestiges of homosexuality is the foulest attack to the American people's purest beliefs and values.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | United Press International
Ford Motor Co. said today it expects to raise 1987 vehicle prices about 2.5% based on an equal increase in the Consumer Price Index. Louis R. Ross, executive vice president for North American Automotive Operations, said the price increases most likely will be announced on a tentative basis sometime next month. Ford President Harold A. Poling said Ford has about a $750 cost differential between its cars and Japanese cars, down from about $2,500 a year ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990
One man was killed and six other people, including four children, were injured when a car went through a stop sign and hit another auto broadside in an intersection near Palmdale, the California Highway Patrol reported Friday. The CHP said Louis Ross, 58, of Littlerock died about 8:20 p.m. Thursday after the car he was driving north on 110th Street went through a stop sign at Palmdale Boulevard and crashed into a westbound car carrying five people.
NEWS
August 26, 1985 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. may move some parts-making operations overseas unless the government agrees to lower car fuel economy standards, a senior Ford executive said today. Louis Ross, executive vice president for the company's North American car and truck operations, said the decision to move would come by the end of the year unless so-called corporate average fuel economy requirements were lowered for cars built in the United States.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1986
Ford Motor Co. announced Monday that Robert Lutz, credited with cutting costs and boosting profits as chairman of Ford of Europe, will be brought to the United States to run the firm's vast truck operations. Market analysts said they were surprised by the move, given Lutz's favorable track record in Europe and General Motors Corp.'s renewed assault on Ford's market leadership there. GM recently reorganized its European operations.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The once-mighty Obear-Nester Glass Co., where proud workers used to turn out bottles by the millions, has become just another dead factory in this all-but-dead city--quiet and smoke-dirty, with the sad and seedy look of unused structures everywhere.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1985 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. may move some parts-making operations overseas unless the government agrees to lower car fuel-economy standards, a senior Ford executive said Monday. Louis Ross, executive vice-president for the company's North American car and truck operations, said the decision to move may come by year-end unless so-called corporate average fuel economy requirements are lowered for cars built in the United States.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1987 | From Reuters
TRW Inc., the major automotive supplier, has won a contract to design and supply all of Ford's seat belts and air bags in North America, the No. 2 U.S. auto maker said Wednesday. "Ford has chosen TRW to supply our occupant restraint systems because of TRW's outstanding technical capabilities and record for quality," Ford Executive Vice President Louis Ross said in a statement.
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