Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLouis Xiv
IN THE NEWS

Louis Xiv

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | Chris Lee
To hear it from Jason Hill, co-frontman, producer-engineer and lead songwriter for the decadent San Diego glam rock quartet Louis XIV, the band's most ardent followers break down into two constituencies. "You get the young 15-year-old, 18-year-old girls at the shows," Hill explains one recent evening in a Culver City broadcast studio where he was set to be interviewed on "Loveline." "They like the directness in the vocals and the flirtatious playfulness of the songs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 14, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
After listening to the waiter try to explain the concept at the new XIV in West Hollywood, we're thoroughly confused. It's social dining, he tells us. But isn't all eating in restaurants inherently social? The menu is all small plates, but he doesn't call it a small-plates restaurant either. "So -- it's a tasting menu," someone prompts the waiter. "No, it's not," he answers. OK, then, could it be considered a do-it-yourself multi-course menu? Something like that.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In accordance with Stereotyping 101, people are supposed to believe the French are a surly lot, but whoever concocted this conclusion just wasn't invited to the right parties. At Louis XIV, a French-owned and -operated restaurant and nightclub on a quiet stretch of La Brea Avenue in Los Angeles, the environment is definitively sociable--the antithesis of the French cliche.
NEWS
September 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
At the Palace of Versailles, a marble statue of Louis XIV now shares space with some unlikely interlopers: an inflatable lobster, a giant balloon dog, and Michael Jackson and his pet chimp Bubbles, sculpted in porcelain. Officials at Versailles, the most gilded and over the top of French palaces, have let American artist Jeff Koons redecorate, and his eye-popping, zany sculptures are on display alongside masterpieces by Veronese and Bernini. The show, which runs through Dec. 14, is yet another sign that France's bastions of traditional culture are loosening up. The Louvre has played host to contemporary artists and even welcomed slam poets to perform in its echoing galleries.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
The pageantry, the formality and the great good humor of French music at mid-Baroque -- in works by Michel-Richard de Lalande, Jean-Marie Leclair and Jean-Fery Rebel -- were exuberantly displayed at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday night. The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra of San Francisco was led by French Canadian conductor Bernard Labadie in a program of music created for the court of Louis XIV, the Sun King.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2000 | LINA LECARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mondays are nothing to look forward to for most of us. They bring our weekends to an abrupt halt and remind us of responsibilities to be met, bills to be paid and work to be done in the week ahead. But for regulars at Monday's Social, Mondays are a time to celebrate with good people, great food and impeccably selected beats.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
ALTHOUGH he was not the celebrated rake and seducer his grandfather Henri IV was, Louis XIV (1638-1715) was undoubtedly a man who loved women: intellectually, socially -- and physically, as Antonia Fraser makes clear in her book "Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King."
FOOD
February 28, 2001 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francois Vatel is remembered as the man who committed suicide because the fish didn't arrive on time for a banquet. To the French, this has made him something like a martyr to their national art, la grande cuisine. It was inevitable that they would eventually make a lush historical film about him: Roland Joffe's newly released "Vatel."
NEWS
October 20, 2007
Tab Hunter: In Thursday's Home section, a profile of Tab Hunter referred to a Louis XXIV chair. It should have said Louis XIV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
Historic choices: Buchanan as Torquemada, Forbes as Louis XIV, Dole as Father Time. RAYMOND J. BOYKO Angelus Oaks, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | Chris Lee
To hear it from Jason Hill, co-frontman, producer-engineer and lead songwriter for the decadent San Diego glam rock quartet Louis XIV, the band's most ardent followers break down into two constituencies. "You get the young 15-year-old, 18-year-old girls at the shows," Hill explains one recent evening in a Culver City broadcast studio where he was set to be interviewed on "Loveline." "They like the directness in the vocals and the flirtatious playfulness of the songs.
NEWS
October 20, 2007
Tab Hunter: In Thursday's Home section, a profile of Tab Hunter referred to a Louis XXIV chair. It should have said Louis XIV.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
KEEPING up with the Joneses can be exhausting. The practice has been called "affluenza" -- the socially transmitted disease of doggedly pursuing the economic and cultural status held by the neighbors. And aside from fatigue, it can cause odd behavior. To witness the delirium in action, a visit to "Oudry's Painted Menagerie" is in order. The rather small, decidedly quirky exhibition recently opened at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It is built around 11 ornamental paintings of mostly exotic animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
ALTHOUGH he was not the celebrated rake and seducer his grandfather Henri IV was, Louis XIV (1638-1715) was undoubtedly a man who loved women: intellectually, socially -- and physically, as Antonia Fraser makes clear in her book "Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King."
NEWS
January 6, 2005 | Kevin Bronson
You'd hardly guess it from their radio hit "I Predict a Riot!" But the Kaiser Chiefs used to be a garage band. "And it's all your fault," vocalist Ricky Wilson says drolly. "The Detroit stuff. The White Stripes being proclaimed the saviors of rock 'n' roll. Who wouldn't want to try that? But we didn't realize that five guys from Leeds don't do American garage rock very well."
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
The pageantry, the formality and the great good humor of French music at mid-Baroque -- in works by Michel-Richard de Lalande, Jean-Marie Leclair and Jean-Fery Rebel -- were exuberantly displayed at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday night. The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra of San Francisco was led by French Canadian conductor Bernard Labadie in a program of music created for the court of Louis XIV, the Sun King.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1999
Please inform Herbert Gold ("Haiti Slides Down, Never Finding Bottom," Commentary, March 10) that it was Louis XIV's great-grandson, Louis XV, who is reported to have said "Apres moi, le deluge." What Louis XIV said was, "L'Etat c'est moi." ROGER E. GOULET Los Angeles
BOOKS
December 22, 2002 | Victor Brombert, Victor Brombert is the author of "Trains of Thought: Memories of a Stateless Youth."
Seven Ages of Paris Alistair Horne Alfred A. Knopf: 436 pp., $35 * That Paris would grow into the capital of a kingdom stretching from the Pyrenees to the Rhine was not a given. But the tiny Roman colony established on a fluvial island in a bend of the Seine did, from the start, offer several key assets: a mild climate, a navigable waterway propitious to the development of major commerce, two river arms providing natural protection.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | LINDA HALES, WASHINGTON POST
Bastille Day might seem an awkward time to contemplate the glories of Versailles. But the court of the French kings inspired some essential underpinnings of another great democracy. This is clear at a glance in the Washington gallery of Susan Calloway, where a rare and famous 1746 plan for the chateau and grounds hangs on the wall. Drawn by the Parisian cartographer Jean Delagrive, it is part of an exhibition of 17th to 19th century plans and perspectives on display through Aug. 25.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|