Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLouise Nevelson
IN THE NEWS

Louise Nevelson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Louise Nevelson, who turned scavenged balusters, bedposts and odd bits of wood into masterpieces of modern sculpture, died Sunday night. She was 88. Nevelson was a serious artist for half a century, but her work was largely ignored until the late 1950s. At her death, the pioneer of environmental art was one of the world's preeminent women artists. Nevelson, who had been in poor health for several months, died at her home in Manhattan's SoHo district.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Louise Nevelson is undoubtedly one of the titans of modern sculpture, but I always found her best-known works to be a bit staid. Grids of interlocking boxes populated with all manner of geometric shapes painted black or white all over, they seemed regimented and a bit coffin-like. This exhibition at L&M Arts focuses on her work from the 1970s and breathes new life into her legacy. Most of the works are large wall pieces. While still rectangular and matte black, their constituent shapes have broken free of the grid, interlocking and overlapping in a way that is almost painterly.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Louise Nevelson, whose eccentric and flamboyant persona became as well known as the aristocratic and elegant wooden sculptures that will be her more lasting legacy, died Sunday, it was learned Monday. The doyenne of American sculpture had been in poor health for several months and died at her home in Manhattan's Soho district in New York at age 88. And although success came to her relatively late in life she welcomed it not as a disquieted senior citizen but as a proud peacock.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Louise Nevelson, who died Sunday, looked like a Gypsy ballerina with her great soulful doe eyes swathed in mink lashes, head turbaned, ears bangled with baubles the size of Ping-Pong balls. She looked like a fortuneteller doyenne fashion model, a Jewish expatriate who was born in Kiev and drank tea from a glass. Born in '99, died in '88 at 88. Nice symmetry in that, especially if you lay the 8s on their sides quadrupling the sign for infinity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
"I'm a woman of great action. I don't sit down and dream. I'd rather move a mountain." Louise Nevelson issues forceful statements as if they were three-dimensional artworks. Her words, like her monumental sculpture, stand straight and tall, building up in layered sentences and mysterious nooks and crannies with lots of space around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Louise Nevelson, who died Sunday, looked like a Gypsy ballerina with her great soulful doe eyes swathed in mink lashes, head turbaned, ears bangled with baubles the size of Ping-Pong balls. She looked like a fortuneteller doyenne fashion model, a Jewish expatriate who was born in Kiev and drank tea from a glass. Born in '99, died in '88 at 88. Nice symmetry in that, especially if you lay the 8s on their sides quadrupling the sign for infinity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, Times Staff Writer
More like a curator than a collector, Richard Brown Baker moved through the San Diego Museum of Art, fine-tuning its display of his choice modern artworks. Somehow, the museum staff had missed some important details: the surreal walking stick attached to Jim Dine's painting "Red Robe No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Louise Nevelson is undoubtedly one of the titans of modern sculpture, but I always found her best-known works to be a bit staid. Grids of interlocking boxes populated with all manner of geometric shapes painted black or white all over, they seemed regimented and a bit coffin-like. This exhibition at L&M Arts focuses on her work from the 1970s and breathes new life into her legacy. Most of the works are large wall pieces. While still rectangular and matte black, their constituent shapes have broken free of the grid, interlocking and overlapping in a way that is almost painterly.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998
* "Mother's Pub Outing"--Grace Robertson's 1954 photograph taken in England is part of "Classic Images for the Holidays" starting Saturday at the Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica. * Anders A--New three-dimensional paintings and installations by the Swedish artist opens Friday at the Highways Gallery in Santa Monica. * Louise Nevelson--Figurative drawings and ceramic sculptures from the 1930s and '40s by the artist will be on display beginning Saturday at the Bobbie Greenfield Gallery.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Louise Nevelson, whose eccentric and flamboyant persona became as well known as the aristocratic and elegant wooden sculptures that will be her more lasting legacy, died Sunday, it was learned Monday. The doyenne of American sculpture had been in poor health for several months and died at her home in Manhattan's Soho district in New York at age 88. And although success came to her relatively late in life she welcomed it not as a disquieted senior citizen but as a proud peacock.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Louise Nevelson, who turned scavenged balusters, bedposts and odd bits of wood into masterpieces of modern sculpture, died Sunday night. She was 88. Nevelson was a serious artist for half a century, but her work was largely ignored until the late 1950s. At her death, the pioneer of environmental art was one of the world's preeminent women artists. Nevelson, who had been in poor health for several months, died at her home in Manhattan's SoHo district.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, Times Staff Writer
More like a curator than a collector, Richard Brown Baker moved through the San Diego Museum of Art, fine-tuning its display of his choice modern artworks. Somehow, the museum staff had missed some important details: the surreal walking stick attached to Jim Dine's painting "Red Robe No.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
"I'm a woman of great action. I don't sit down and dream. I'd rather move a mountain." Louise Nevelson issues forceful statements as if they were three-dimensional artworks. Her words, like her monumental sculpture, stand straight and tall, building up in layered sentences and mysterious nooks and crannies with lots of space around them.
NEWS
December 11, 1998
COMEDY Celia Fox's musical comedy "L.A. Underground" plays at Masquer's Cabaret in L.A. tonight and Dec. 18. (213) 390-5586. HOLIDAY Pet night with Santa on Friday at One Colorado in Pasadena. Proceeds from photo sales benefit AIDS Service Center. (626) 564-1066. THEATER "Santa's Busted Jaw," Wolfskill Theatre Company at L.A. Theatre Center through Dec. 20. (213) 620-9229. MUSIC Get in the mood and honor Ol' Blue Eyes' birthday Saturday with Tony Mack's Swingin' L.A. at Miceli's in Hollywood.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|