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NEWS
March 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Since taking office in May, Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer has balanced a state budget for the first time in the 1980s. He has steered a package of reforms through the Legislature, including political campaign reform and education reform. But he lost his most important battle--overhauling the state's populist taxing structure.
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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, all heavily dependent on oil to keep their coffers full, watched in disbelief as crude prices tumbled to a low of $10 a barrel in 1986, crippling the states' economies and ruining lives. Things are a bit better these days. But like a garden that has been unevenly watered, some cities and regions are making a relatively robust comeback while others are not. Houston is prospering while New Orleans is hurting.
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NEWS
August 14, 1988 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
As the Republicans gather in New Orleans to talk about the prosperity of the Reagan years, there will be more than a little skepticism among some of the folks gathered around their television sets in Louisiana. "Republicans are going to be up there looking at us and talking about good times? Man, you got to be kidding," said Dempsey Meyers, an unemployed draftsman who was catching blue crabs for his supper and getting a serious sunburn recently near this Cajun-country town.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Despite the old saw about the inevitability of death and taxes, tourists from overseas will be able to live it up in Louisiana without paying sales taxes. "Louisiana is already a popular tourist destination with foreign travelers," said Ann P. Borne, director of Louisiana Tax Free Shopping. "This will make it a world-class shopping destination as well. "Tax-free shopping will give foreign visitors a chance to pick up bargains and get refunds of their sales taxes.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Despite the old saw about the inevitability of death and taxes, tourists from overseas will be able to live it up in Louisiana without paying sales taxes. "Louisiana is already a popular tourist destination with foreign travelers," said Ann P. Borne, director of Louisiana Tax Free Shopping. "This will make it a world-class shopping destination as well. "Tax-free shopping will give foreign visitors a chance to pick up bargains and get refunds of their sales taxes.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, all heavily dependent on oil to keep their coffers full, watched in disbelief as crude prices tumbled to a low of $10 a barrel in 1986, crippling the states' economies and ruining lives. Things are a bit better these days. But like a garden that has been unevenly watered, some cities and regions are making a relatively robust comeback while others are not. Houston is prospering while New Orleans is hurting.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Buddy Roemer talked mighty big when he was running for governor. He talked about cleaning up state government. About ending the corruption and the palm-greasings and the good ol' boy system of running Louisiana. He promised to do away with all the crooked, double-dealing ways that have come to characterize Louisiana politics and in some quarters have given this state the reputation of a banana republic that somehow managed to be included in the United States.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Sandra Kees listened to the voice on the other end of the telephone and fumed. No, the child support payment was not in the mail. Yes, her former husband had written the check. But the money had been waylaid in the Treasury of the State of Louisiana, which is the conduit for the money from her "ex." Kees would get her money eventually, the case worker explained, but she would have to wait. "I exploded," Kees said. "I was furious. I didn't know what to do."
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, Associated Press
U.S. 90 snakes its way along Louisiana's coastal area from one end of the state to the other, and the signs of the times are easily found. "For Sale," says one. "Closed," says another. "Calm Seas Never Made Good Sailors," says a third. From New Orleans to Lake Charles, U.S. 90 is the aorta of Louisiana's offshore oil industry, the lifeline of a peculiar business that offers work and wealth to those willing to live afloat 50 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1990
The editorial (Oct. 4) on Duke answered its own question quite succinctly: "Louisiana's economy is the worst in the nation with no relief in sight." In 1933, one could say the same thing for Germany, which paved the way for Adolf Hitler. Therefore, it should be up to the federal government (with assistance from the state government of Louisiana) to do "something" to "improve" the bleak economic picture. EDDIE CRESS Los Angeles
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Buddy Roemer talked mighty big when he was running for governor. He talked about cleaning up state government. About ending the corruption and the palm-greasings and the good ol' boy system of running Louisiana. He promised to do away with all the crooked, double-dealing ways that have come to characterize Louisiana politics and in some quarters have given this state the reputation of a banana republic that somehow managed to be included in the United States.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Since taking office in May, Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer has balanced a state budget for the first time in the 1980s. He has steered a package of reforms through the Legislature, including political campaign reform and education reform. But he lost his most important battle--overhauling the state's populist taxing structure.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
As the Republicans gather in New Orleans to talk about the prosperity of the Reagan years, there will be more than a little skepticism among some of the folks gathered around their television sets in Louisiana. "Republicans are going to be up there looking at us and talking about good times? Man, you got to be kidding," said Dempsey Meyers, an unemployed draftsman who was catching blue crabs for his supper and getting a serious sunburn recently near this Cajun-country town.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Sandra Kees listened to the voice on the other end of the telephone and fumed. No, the child support payment was not in the mail. Yes, her former husband had written the check. But the money had been waylaid in the Treasury of the State of Louisiana, which is the conduit for the money from her "ex." Kees would get her money eventually, the case worker explained, but she would have to wait. "I exploded," Kees said. "I was furious. I didn't know what to do."
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, Associated Press
U.S. 90 snakes its way along Louisiana's coastal area from one end of the state to the other, and the signs of the times are easily found. "For Sale," says one. "Closed," says another. "Calm Seas Never Made Good Sailors," says a third. From New Orleans to Lake Charles, U.S. 90 is the aorta of Louisiana's offshore oil industry, the lifeline of a peculiar business that offers work and wealth to those willing to live afloat 50 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico.
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
A Republican Party committee Tuesday recommended New Orleans as the site for the 1988 GOP National Convention--under terms that would prohibit the Democratic nominating convention from meeting in that city. The full Republican National Committee is expected to approve the recommendation Friday. In a press conference convened here coincidentally as the Democratic Party site selection committee was touring New Orleans, Republican National Chairman Frank J. Fahrenkopf Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2005 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
There were three ways you could tell that you weren't in New Orleans on Thursday at the House of Blues in West Hollywood. So said actor-satirist Harry Shearer in his role as emcee of Second Line on Sunset, a showcase of, and benefit for, Crescent City musicians two months after the devastating hurricane and flood. First, he said, "you aren't sweating." Second, trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, the evening's opening act, was not cooking up barbecue outside the club, as is his custom at home.
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