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Louisiana Elections

NEWS
November 14, 1991 | CHUCK PHLILIPS
A&M Records contacted David Duke's headquarters Wednesday to demand that the Louisiana Republican candidate stop playing Bryan Adams' pop single, "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You," during campaign rallies. The romantic ballad was featured in the hit motion picture "Robin Hood" and dominated the pop charts for seven weeks this summer.
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NEWS
November 12, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
With former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke making a strong run for governor, get-out-the-vote efforts in Louisiana's black communities are the strongest since the early days of the civil rights movement. "History is going to be made," said the Rev. Zebadee Bridges, president of the political arm of the Interdenominational Assn. of Black Ministers of New Orleans. "We are going to get the vote out as never before."
SPORTS
November 14, 1991 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI
With the Louisiana gubernatorial election only two days away, Sugar Bowl officials are nervously awaiting the potential political fallout should Republican candidate David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, win the much-publicized race. Last year, the Phoenix-based Fiesta Bowl found itself in the middle of the controversy involving a failed Arizona referendum calling for a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now comes the homestretch, the final week of a campaign in which the voters of Louisiana will decide if a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan will be their next governor. Republican David Duke, who in addition to his KKK affiliation, founded the National Assn. for the Advancement of White People and promoted the notion that the Holocaust never occurred, is pitted against Democrat Edwin W. Edwards, a three-time former governor with a roving eye who is a symbol of the state's corrupt past.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush should urge Louisiana voters to support former Gov. Edwin W. Edwards against one-time Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, Senate Democratic leader George J. Mitchell of Maine said Sunday. But White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu said that Bush has made his opposition to Duke clear and that endorsing Edwards might strike Louisiana voters as undue outside interference. "I've made my position clear on this. I want to do what's going to help see that Mr.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | From Associated Press
A group of Republican senators delivered an endorsement to a Democratic colleague Wednesday as they urged Louisiana voters to reject former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke and another GOP candidate. Eight Republican senators from other states urged the reelection of Louisiana Sen. J. Bennett Johnston in the state's election Saturday as a repudiation of what they said was Duke's racism, anti-Semitism and hatred.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With morning-after contrition, President Bush vowed Wednesday to "go the extra mile" to restart the stalled economy during a stay-at-home November as he responds to an off-year election message of domestic discontent. The grudging concession that his attention may have been wrongly focused comes at the end of one of the worst political weeks of his presidency and marks an unmistakable attempt by Bush to reposition himself for what suddenly looms as a troublesome reelection bid.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
White House officials, caught in a rift between top Bush Administration policy-makers over how to fuel a sputtering economy, have decided to delay any decision on a possible tax cut for middle-class Americans, Administration sources said Friday. President Bush himself signaled the shift in Administration strategy, saying that he is still "trying to sort out" whether such a measure is needed at a time of mixed signals about the severity of the economic problems facing the nation.
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