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NEWS
August 29, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to extricate himself from turmoil surrounding relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, President Bush defended the federal response to the massive storm damage on Friday and declared that he would send more help if needed. "We will commit all federal military resources necessary to help the people in Florida," he said at a hastily called meeting with reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
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NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate on Wednesday convicted a Louisiana federal judge on corruption and perjury charges, the first time in more than two decades the chamber has voted to remove a public official after an impeachment trial. The vote to remove Judge Thomas Porteous was unanimous on one of the four articles of impeachment; the charges were brought against Porteous in unanimous votes by the House of Representatives in March. He becomes the eighth federal judge removed from office. The Senate also voted to bar him from ever holding public office in the future.
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NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate on Wednesday convicted a Louisiana federal judge on corruption and perjury charges, the first time in more than two decades the chamber has voted to remove a public official after an impeachment trial. The vote to remove Judge Thomas Porteous was unanimous on one of the four articles of impeachment; the charges were brought against Porteous in unanimous votes by the House of Representatives in March. He becomes the eighth federal judge removed from office. The Senate also voted to bar him from ever holding public office in the future.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to extricate himself from turmoil surrounding relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, President Bush defended the federal response to the massive storm damage on Friday and declared that he would send more help if needed. "We will commit all federal military resources necessary to help the people in Florida," he said at a hastily called meeting with reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was sentenced to six years and 10 months in prison for scheming with a politically connected New Orleans businessman to split a drug smuggler's $100,000 payoff. The businessman, John Ross, was sentenced to seven years and four months in prison. Collins and Ross were convicted in June of bribery, conspiracy and obstruction of justice in a scheme to take a bribe from a convicted marijuana smuggler.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
The investigation and cleanup of the space shuttle Columbia accident has cost the government almost $400 million, NASA officials said Thursday. The space agency spent $18.7 million on direct costs of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, the 13-member panel of outside experts who analyzed the Feb. 1 tragedy. That spending included transportation, the hiring of consultants and administrative costs such as the printing of the 248-page report. NASA spent $112.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Justice Department officials have decided not to charge the American-born prisoner who was transferred from a U.S. military prison in Cuba to Norfolk, Va., last week, concluding that U.S. prosecutors lack enough incriminating information, officials said. That leaves the detainee, Yaser Esam Hamdi, 22, in legal limbo as government lawyers try to determine whether there is a way to charge him under U.S. military law.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
A California congressman disclosed Wednesday that the Interior Department failed to assess any civil penalties against the oil industry for six years despite finding thousands of separate safety violations aboard offshore oil rigs in that period. The 16,000 infractions--more than 1,300 of them on rigs off the California coast--ranged from relatively minor incidents of housekeeping violations to more severe cases of blowouts, oil spills and malfunctioning pollution-control equipment.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | DAN MORGAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
There would be sharp differences in the amount of new federal money going to individual states under President Clinton's health care plan, and states that are now the most restrictive in granting medical assistance to the poor generally would be the biggest winners, according to a study released today.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Facing last-minute questions over its plan to launch exploratory oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean, Shell Oil Co. pledged Monday to deploy a prefabricated coffer dam ready for "immediate" use in the event of a blowout, with a full-scale oil spill response within an hour. In a letter intended to reassure federal officials that offshore drilling can safely begin in the fragile Arctic in July despite the spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Shell said it also would be ready to apply dispersant immediately underwater near the source of any oil flow and would have a remotely operated submersible and trained divers at the drilling site.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Robert F. Collins was sentenced to six years and 10 months in prison for scheming with a politically connected New Orleans businessman to split a drug smuggler's $100,000 payoff. The businessman, John Ross, was sentenced to seven years and four months in prison. Collins and Ross were convicted in June of bribery, conspiracy and obstruction of justice in a scheme to take a bribe from a convicted marijuana smuggler.
OPINION
September 8, 2005 | Paul Thornton
With "TURF WARS" consuming Louisiana and federal officials over who should have responded to what and when, the Times-Picayune of New Orleans on Wednesday gave the most clear-cut advice to the bureaucrats: Enough. In an angry editorial, the Times-Picayune wrote that the feds, who accused local officials of hampering relief efforts by protecting their state's home "turf," are the ones engaging in an "awfully convenient dodge" of accountability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1985
The U.S. Senate rarely rejects presidential nominees for high executive jobs. The theory, a sound one, is that the President is entitled to put together his own team. The case of William Bradford Reynolds, assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights, is something else. President Reagan wants to promote him to the third-ranking position at the Department of Justice. The Senate cannot confirm his appointment without endorsing, or appearing to endorse, his sorry record in his present job.
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