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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | United Press International
A seven-alarm fire Wednesday swept through the upper level of the historic Cabildo in the French Quarter, destroying priceless relics in the 18th-Century structure that was built to house the Spanish colonial government of the Louisiana Territory. Two firefighters were slightly injured in the fire that also threatened the nearby St. Louis Cathedral, the nation's oldest cathedral, before it was brought under control after more than two hours.
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NEWS
November 15, 1995 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If history were his guide, Cleo Fields wouldn't be here right now, not in the guest of honor's seat at a Rotary Club luncheon, and certainly not as a candidate for governor of Louisiana. Physically, he's all wrong for the part, nothing like the flamboyant swashbucklers and corpulent good ol' boys who have earned this state its piquant political reputation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer and
Officially Mardi Gras is Tuesday, but for the folks at Aubry's barber shop, it comes twice a week. Barber Leon Aubry, his family and about 30 loyal customers have partied there regularly for the last 54 years, "just for the hell of it," they say. Some of the group, mostly men over 50, meticulously cook spicy foods like alligator gumbo, hog-head cheese and red beans and rice on a stove in a back room of the barber shop.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tomb of the man labeled by history as Huey P. Long's assassin was opened in Baton Rouge as a forensics sleuth hoped to settle questions about the death of the Louisiana political legend. Workers carefully scraped away 19 inches of hard dirt on top of the vault of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss, who died in a hail of bullets along with Long in 1935. If historic accounts are correct, Weiss shot the "Kingfish" as he strolled down a state Capitol corridor, then was killed by Long's bodyguards.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If history were his guide, Cleo Fields wouldn't be here right now, not in the guest of honor's seat at a Rotary Club luncheon, and certainly not as a candidate for governor of Louisiana. Physically, he's all wrong for the part, nothing like the flamboyant swashbucklers and corpulent good ol' boys who have earned this state its piquant political reputation.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tomb of the man labeled by history as Huey P. Long's assassin was opened in Baton Rouge as a forensics sleuth hoped to settle questions about the death of the Louisiana political legend. Workers carefully scraped away 19 inches of hard dirt on top of the vault of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss, who died in a hail of bullets along with Long in 1935. If historic accounts are correct, Weiss shot the "Kingfish" as he strolled down a state Capitol corridor, then was killed by Long's bodyguards.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Ranger Bruce Barnes shined his spotlight over the black waters of the bayou from his canoe. Everywhere he moved the light, he picked up glowing red eyes of alligators. He imitated the sound of an alligator's bark. A pair of red eyes headed in his direction. As Barnes, 26, led the monthly, three-hour, full-moon canoe trip in the Barataria unit of Jean Lafitte Park, 18 miles south of New Orleans, owls hooted. Coyotes howled. Fish jumped out of the water. Ten different species of frogs croaked.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2005 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
A century ago, sung in the Appalachian hills from the point of view of a young and weary prostitute, it was about the pitfalls of sin. In the 1940s, Woody Guthrie turned it into an anthem to working-class America. In the 1960s, it was about daring sexuality. At every turn, even as its words wrapped themselves around new eras and sensibilities, "House of the Rising Sun" remained a song of New Orleans.
TRAVEL
February 26, 2006 | Chris Erskine
THE Louisiana State Museum, a $22.8-million, 69,000-square-foot metallic building showcasing state artifacts and oddities, opened this month in Baton Rouge. The museum presents Louisiana's history through themes rather than chronology.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2005 | Ken Silverstein and Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writers
Senior officials in Louisiana's emergency planning agency already were awaiting trial over allegations stemming from a federal investigation into waste, mismanagement and missing funds when Hurricane Katrina struck. And federal auditors are still trying to track as much as $60 million in unaccounted for funds that were funneled to the state from the Federal Emergency Management Agency dating back to 1998. In March, FEMA demanded that Louisiana repay $30.4 million to the federal government.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Ranger Bruce Barnes shined his spotlight over the black waters of the bayou from his canoe. Everywhere he moved the light, he picked up glowing red eyes of alligators. He imitated the sound of an alligator's bark. A pair of red eyes headed in his direction. As Barnes, 26, led the monthly, three-hour, full-moon canoe trip in the Barataria unit of Jean Lafitte Park, 18 miles south of New Orleans, owls hooted. Coyotes howled. Fish jumped out of the water. Ten different species of frogs croaked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer and
Officially Mardi Gras is Tuesday, but for the folks at Aubry's barber shop, it comes twice a week. Barber Leon Aubry, his family and about 30 loyal customers have partied there regularly for the last 54 years, "just for the hell of it," they say. Some of the group, mostly men over 50, meticulously cook spicy foods like alligator gumbo, hog-head cheese and red beans and rice on a stove in a back room of the barber shop.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | United Press International
A seven-alarm fire Wednesday swept through the upper level of the historic Cabildo in the French Quarter, destroying priceless relics in the 18th-Century structure that was built to house the Spanish colonial government of the Louisiana Territory. Two firefighters were slightly injured in the fire that also threatened the nearby St. Louis Cathedral, the nation's oldest cathedral, before it was brought under control after more than two hours.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From United Press International
The Louisiana Senate voted Tuesday night to approve what could become the nation's most restrictive abortion law, moving the legislation a step closer to a veto showdown with Gov. Buddy Roemer. The all-male Senate voted 24 to 15 to approve the bill after almost five hours of debate. One minor amendment was added to the House-passed bill, meaning it must go back to the lower chamber for concurrence. The House is likely to accept the Senate amendment, sending the bill to Gov.
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