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NATIONAL
August 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
Since Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, National Guard troops from Gulf Coast states serving in Iraq have followed the disaster, worried about families and friends back home. "It's a significant emotional event. Their families are on the forefront of the disaster," said Lt. Col. Jordan Jones of the 141st Field Artillery of the Louisiana National Guard. "They're all watching TV, and some have seen their neighborhoods completely submerged in water." Jones, from Luling, La.
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NATIONAL
August 30, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - After three days of mayhem, a weakened Isaac edged northward out of Louisiana on Thursday, leaving a third of the state without power, more than 60,000 residents evacuated and worried officials preparing to release water from a storm-stressed dam near the Mississippi border. At least one death was reported. Hundreds of homes remained underwater, and nearly 5,900 weary residents in Louisiana and more than 1,800 in Mississippi scrambled to makeshift shelters. At least 500 people who had gambled on riding out the storm were rescued by helicopter or boat, as Isaac was downgraded late Thursday to a tropical depression - a far cry from its 80-mph winds at landfall.
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NATIONAL
September 27, 2005 | Susannah Rosenblatt and James Rainey, Times Staff Writers
Maj. Ed Bush recalled how he stood in the bed of a pickup truck in the days after Hurricane Katrina, struggling to help the crowd outside the Louisiana Superdome separate fact from fiction. Armed only with a megaphone and scant information, he might have been shouting into, well, a hurricane. The National Guard spokesman's accounts about rescue efforts, water supplies and first aid all but disappeared amid the roar of a 24-hour rumor mill at New Orleans' main evacuation shelter.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Five Louisiana National Guardsmen spotted a pickup truck parked outside a garbage-strewn, gutted house on desolate Bellaire Drive in the city's Lakeview neighborhood one recent morning. In the back of the truck was a pile of copper pipes and other scrap metal -- valuable booty in this post-Hurricane Katrina world, where such raw materials fetch a profit. Sgt.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After two days of unauthorized absence, the 40 members of a Louisiana National Guard unit who walked off their central Texas post complaining about Army training and chow returned to duty Thursday to face punishment that could include confinement at hard labor, the Army said. Some of the guardsmen from the 1st Battalion, 156th Armor, 256th Infantry Brigade, headquartered at Shreveport, La., left Fort Hood on Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2005 | Scott Gold, David Zucchino and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Search teams pressing to evacuate the living and find the dead after a full week under the high-water sway of Hurricane Katrina found their efforts complicated Monday by the refusal of hundreds of residents to leave the paralyzed city. President Bush returned Monday for a second tour of the disaster zone, praising emergency workers in Baton Rouge, La., and stressing the work of religious charities during a visit to a church packed with evacuees.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Greeted by the blasts of water cannon, 100 members of the Louisiana National Guard returned home Friday from Iraq, leaving behind the carnage of warfare to find their families in their hurricane-ravaged state. As soon as the plane touched down, the troops clapped and yelled, "Yeah!" "Ladies and gentlemen, welcome home!" a flight attendant announced. "We're glad you're home safe."
NATIONAL
August 30, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - After three days of mayhem, a weakened Isaac edged northward out of Louisiana on Thursday, leaving a third of the state without power, more than 60,000 residents evacuated and worried officials preparing to release water from a storm-stressed dam near the Mississippi border. At least one death was reported. Hundreds of homes remained underwater, and nearly 5,900 weary residents in Louisiana and more than 1,800 in Mississippi scrambled to makeshift shelters. At least 500 people who had gambled on riding out the storm were rescued by helicopter or boat, as Isaac was downgraded late Thursday to a tropical depression - a far cry from its 80-mph winds at landfall.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2005 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
On Saturday afternoon, as the Louisiana Superdome was finally emptying out, a lesser-known humanitarian crisis was in its fifth day a few blocks east, at the wrecked, mile-long Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. There, up to 20,000 survivors of Hurricane Katrina, desperate and dehydrated, waited in the punishing midday sun to board buses bound for Texas. By nightfall, almost 19,000 had been evacuated, according to the National Guard.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Five Louisiana National Guardsmen spotted a pickup truck parked outside a garbage-strewn, gutted house on desolate Bellaire Drive in the city's Lakeview neighborhood one recent morning. In the back of the truck was a pile of copper pipes and other scrap metal -- valuable booty in this post-Hurricane Katrina world, where such raw materials fetch a profit. Sgt.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2005 | Susannah Rosenblatt and James Rainey, Times Staff Writers
Maj. Ed Bush recalled how he stood in the bed of a pickup truck in the days after Hurricane Katrina, struggling to help the crowd outside the Louisiana Superdome separate fact from fiction. Armed only with a megaphone and scant information, he might have been shouting into, well, a hurricane. The National Guard spokesman's accounts about rescue efforts, water supplies and first aid all but disappeared amid the roar of a 24-hour rumor mill at New Orleans' main evacuation shelter.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Greeted by the blasts of water cannon, 100 members of the Louisiana National Guard returned home Friday from Iraq, leaving behind the carnage of warfare to find their families in their hurricane-ravaged state. As soon as the plane touched down, the troops clapped and yelled, "Yeah!" "Ladies and gentlemen, welcome home!" a flight attendant announced. "We're glad you're home safe."
NATIONAL
September 6, 2005 | Scott Gold, David Zucchino and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Search teams pressing to evacuate the living and find the dead after a full week under the high-water sway of Hurricane Katrina found their efforts complicated Monday by the refusal of hundreds of residents to leave the paralyzed city. President Bush returned Monday for a second tour of the disaster zone, praising emergency workers in Baton Rouge, La., and stressing the work of religious charities during a visit to a church packed with evacuees.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2005 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
On Saturday afternoon, as the Louisiana Superdome was finally emptying out, a lesser-known humanitarian crisis was in its fifth day a few blocks east, at the wrecked, mile-long Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. There, up to 20,000 survivors of Hurricane Katrina, desperate and dehydrated, waited in the punishing midday sun to board buses bound for Texas. By nightfall, almost 19,000 had been evacuated, according to the National Guard.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
Since Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, National Guard troops from Gulf Coast states serving in Iraq have followed the disaster, worried about families and friends back home. "It's a significant emotional event. Their families are on the forefront of the disaster," said Lt. Col. Jordan Jones of the 141st Field Artillery of the Louisiana National Guard. "They're all watching TV, and some have seen their neighborhoods completely submerged in water." Jones, from Luling, La.
WORLD
November 11, 2003 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
In December, just before the Florida National Guard's 124th Infantry Regiment was mobilized for the war in Iraq, Sgt. James Flores' 23-year-old son asked him, "Dad, why do you have to do something like this at your age?" Flores, 49, replied, "Son, it's still my turn." Flores was to report for active duty at noon, Dec. 27. At 10:15 that morning, he hurried into the office of a justice of the peace near Kissimmee, his fiancee in tow, to get a marriage license.
WORLD
November 11, 2003 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
In December, just before the Florida National Guard's 124th Infantry Regiment was mobilized for the war in Iraq, Sgt. James Flores' 23-year-old son asked him, "Dad, why do you have to do something like this at your age?" Flores, 49, replied, "Son, it's still my turn." Flores was to report for active duty at noon, Dec. 27. At 10:15 that morning, he hurried into the office of a justice of the peace near Kissimmee, his fiancee in tow, to get a marriage license.
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 220,000 armed forces reserves and National Guard personnel were called up in the Persian Gulf crisis, and by most accounts, the many specialized logistic and other support units involved performed well. But an angry dispute has arisen over the call-up, subsequent training and lack of Gulf deployment of about 14,000 National Guardsmen in three combat brigades from Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana.
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 220,000 armed forces reserves and National Guard personnel were called up in the Persian Gulf crisis, and by most accounts, the many specialized logistic and other support units involved performed well. But an angry dispute has arisen over the call-up, subsequent training and lack of Gulf deployment of about 14,000 National Guardsmen in three combat brigades from Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After two days of unauthorized absence, the 40 members of a Louisiana National Guard unit who walked off their central Texas post complaining about Army training and chow returned to duty Thursday to face punishment that could include confinement at hard labor, the Army said. Some of the guardsmen from the 1st Battalion, 156th Armor, 256th Infantry Brigade, headquartered at Shreveport, La., left Fort Hood on Tuesday.
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