Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLouisiana School
IN THE NEWS

Louisiana School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Mike Foster of Louisiana signed the nation's first state law requiring students to address teachers as "ma'am" or "sir" or use the appropriate title of Mr., Miss, Ms. or Mrs. The Republican governor and other politicians said in Baton Rouge that the law will help return respect to the classroom. The law will apply to those in kindergarten through fifth grade beginning next fall. Higher grades will be phased in over the next few years, one grade per year. The law specifies no punishment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 17, 2003 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana State University sent John David Booty a recruiting letter in the sixth grade. Miami relayed an informal scholarship offer the next year when the strong-armed young quarterback took his first high school snap as a seventh-grader. Booty stayed on the fast track to college football, and possibly beyond, when he announced Wednesday that he will forgo his senior season at Evangel Christian Academy in Shreveport, La., and enroll at USC in the fall.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ALAN SAYRE, Associated Press
Change comes slowly down the two-lane highway that winds through forests and dairy pastures into Greensburg. It's taken four decades for desegregation to reach the seat of St. Helena Parish. Even now, a visitor looking for John Hall's house behind the Masonic lodge is asked: "You talking about the white Masonic hall or the black one?" "This parish hasn't changed since 1907 . . . . Education has been what kept it like it is," said Hall, a construction worker who has spent 37 of his 70 years fighting to give black students--including his 14 children--a chance.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Mike Foster of Louisiana signed the nation's first state law requiring students to address teachers as "ma'am" or "sir" or use the appropriate title of Mr., Miss, Ms. or Mrs. The Republican governor and other politicians said in Baton Rouge that the law will help return respect to the classroom. The law will apply to those in kindergarten through fifth grade beginning next fall. Higher grades will be phased in over the next few years, one grade per year. The law specifies no punishment.
SPORTS
May 13, 1993 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bridgete Williams, a 5-foot-6 guard who led Harbor College's basketball team to the quarterfinals of the state tournament, has signed a letter of intent to play at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La., in the fall. Williams, a Morningside High grad, said she also visited Cal State Long Beach, but preferred the atmosphere at Northwestern. "It was nice and quiet and the people were real nice," she said. "I think they'll really appreciate me there."
SPORTS
April 17, 2003 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana State University sent John David Booty a recruiting letter in the sixth grade. Miami relayed an informal scholarship offer the next year when the strong-armed young quarterback took his first high school snap as a seventh-grader. Booty stayed on the fast track to college football, and possibly beyond, when he announced Wednesday that he will forgo his senior season at Evangel Christian Academy in Shreveport, La., and enroll at USC in the fall.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1987 | PAUL CIOTTI, Paul Ciotti is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer
KERMIT ALEXANDER is upset. He's too much of a gentleman to be blunt about it. But sitting in his second-story Westwood office, the emotion rumbles out of him like some volcanic aftershock. In person, Alexander makes a formidable impression. Although he's retired from professional football, his biceps bulge like cast-iron drainpipes under his plaid shirt. Sitting behind his desk, he comes across as a strong, masculine presence, a leader, and someone, one senses, not to be lightly crossed.
SPORTS
November 13, 1986
Louisiana Tech football Coach A.L. Williams, 52, will step down at the end of the season and become assistant athletic director at the north Louisiana school
SPORTS
November 29, 1987
Grambling's 27-21 loss to Southern University Saturday had college football's most successful coach thinking about retiring, but Eddie Robinson said that might be his bitterest option. "I'm taking a look at myself," Robinson, 68, told reporters after the game. "I love the game . . . It would be hard for me to walk away from it. If I feel I can't make the contribution . . . "I can't blame nobody. I blame myself. I should be able to call the right plays. "I didn't say I was going to retire, but .
SPORTS
May 13, 1993 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bridgete Williams, a 5-foot-6 guard who led Harbor College's basketball team to the quarterfinals of the state tournament, has signed a letter of intent to play at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La., in the fall. Williams, a Morningside High grad, said she also visited Cal State Long Beach, but preferred the atmosphere at Northwestern. "It was nice and quiet and the people were real nice," she said. "I think they'll really appreciate me there."
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ALAN SAYRE, Associated Press
Change comes slowly down the two-lane highway that winds through forests and dairy pastures into Greensburg. It's taken four decades for desegregation to reach the seat of St. Helena Parish. Even now, a visitor looking for John Hall's house behind the Masonic lodge is asked: "You talking about the white Masonic hall or the black one?" "This parish hasn't changed since 1907 . . . . Education has been what kept it like it is," said Hall, a construction worker who has spent 37 of his 70 years fighting to give black students--including his 14 children--a chance.
NEWS
March 7, 1988
About 50 students, faculty and alumni of Gallaudet University in Washington gathered at the gates to the school and waved signed urging "Deaf President Now," hours before the board of trustees was expected to name a new school president. The rally was the latest in a week of demonstrations aimed at pressuring the board to name a deaf president of Gallaudet, which is the only university for the deaf in the world.
OPINION
December 20, 2001
It is ironic that John Balzar would suggest that only the narrow-minded would oppose a moment of silence because "it might be seen as a victory for prayer" ("Silence is Golden," Commentary, Dec. 16) since, just a few days earlier, The Times printed a story detailing how a federal court had to invalidate a Louisiana school prayer law precisely because that state's legislature attempted to transform a moment of silent meditation into an act permitting spoken prayer in public classrooms (Dec.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|