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NEWS
May 1, 1989
Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer proposed closing some state hospitals and universities after voters rejected by 55% to 45% his new tax plan Saturday. The Legislature faces a $700-million deficit for the fiscal year that begins July 1. An aide said Roemer would have specifics, including layoffs of state employees, within a week. Roemer's plan would have shifted the tax burden away from big business by raising the individual income tax. It would have reduced sales taxes, given businesses incentives and raised the gasoline tax.
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NEWS
February 9, 1991 | Associated Press
State Rep. David Duke, the former Ku Klux Klan leader turned politician, admits he paid his property taxes late but said there was nothing illegal about it. Duke, who was elected to the Louisiana Legislature as a Republican two years ago, said that he paid the property taxes and back interest for 1987, 1989 and 1990 this week because of news reports that he owed the money. "There's nothing illegal or immoral about waiting to pay," said Duke, who is now running for governor.
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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Faced with a fiscal crisis that threatens to bankrupt state government, Louisiana's Legislature finished work Saturday on a package giving Gov. Buddy Roemer unprecedented budget authority. "It was not my personal influence. It was the circumstances we found ourselves in," Roemer said when the special session ended after a little more than five days. Roemer received bills that will give his Administration temporary authority to slash spending and impose emergency fee-increases for state services.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Buddy Roemer talked mighty big when he was running for governor. He talked about cleaning up state government. About ending the corruption and the palm-greasings and the good ol' boy system of running Louisiana. He promised to do away with all the crooked, double-dealing ways that have come to characterize Louisiana politics and in some quarters have given this state the reputation of a banana republic that somehow managed to be included in the United States.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Buddy Roemer talked mighty big when he was running for governor. He talked about cleaning up state government. About ending the corruption and the palm-greasings and the good ol' boy system of running Louisiana. He promised to do away with all the crooked, double-dealing ways that have come to characterize Louisiana politics and in some quarters have given this state the reputation of a banana republic that somehow managed to be included in the United States.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | Associated Press
State Rep. David Duke, the former Ku Klux Klan leader turned politician, admits he paid his property taxes late but said there was nothing illegal about it. Duke, who was elected to the Louisiana Legislature as a Republican two years ago, said that he paid the property taxes and back interest for 1987, 1989 and 1990 this week because of news reports that he owed the money. "There's nothing illegal or immoral about waiting to pay," said Duke, who is now running for governor.
OPINION
October 26, 2004 | Joe Mathews, Joe Mathews is a Los Angeles Times reporter.
Coming Nov. 2: Armageddon! With California voters facing 16 propositions, including 11 ballot initiatives, the familiar cry of apocalypse is being heard across the state. Newspapers warn of voter confusion. Legislators bemoan that matters best left for the Legislature are being decided by -- gasp, of all people -- the people. Whether you vote yes or no, you are told the end is near.
NEWS
May 1, 1989
Louisiana Gov. Buddy Roemer proposed closing some state hospitals and universities after voters rejected by 55% to 45% his new tax plan Saturday. The Legislature faces a $700-million deficit for the fiscal year that begins July 1. An aide said Roemer would have specifics, including layoffs of state employees, within a week. Roemer's plan would have shifted the tax burden away from big business by raising the individual income tax. It would have reduced sales taxes, given businesses incentives and raised the gasoline tax.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Faced with a fiscal crisis that threatens to bankrupt state government, Louisiana's Legislature finished work Saturday on a package giving Gov. Buddy Roemer unprecedented budget authority. "It was not my personal influence. It was the circumstances we found ourselves in," Roemer said when the special session ended after a little more than five days. Roemer received bills that will give his Administration temporary authority to slash spending and impose emergency fee-increases for state services.
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