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TRAVEL
August 13, 1995
It would seem that while Bill Heavey was reporting on the crassness of the city of Lourdes ("Lourdes, Sacred and Profane," July 2) and its souvenir sellers, he was displaying plenty himself. While he may not be a believer, there are millions of people whose hope of a miracle is the only thing keeping them or their loved ones alive. How sophisticated of him to jump in line in front of handicapped people in their three-wheeled chairs. As for the souvenirs, would he rather the faithful chip away at the shrine itself for a memento?
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OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By Mollie Lowery
Lourdes was 69 years old when I first met her in 2012. She was living next to a bus stop on a busy four-lane street in front of a Silver Lake supermarket. Lourdes had claimed the spot three years earlier, after she was rousted from her encampment in Griffith Park. Before that, she'd lived in her 1973 Toyota, but it was eventually impounded because of overdue parking tickets. Lourdes was one of the folks we call "chronically homeless. " She'd been surviving on the city's margins for 20 years after losing her low-cost housing because of gentrification.
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TRAVEL
September 14, 2008
I have been to Lourdes, France, twice -- once as a pilgrim in 2001 and last year as a tourist. Susan Spano wrote such a fine article, which caught the essence of Lourdes ["Slice of Heaven," Sept. 7] that I felt as though I were there again. Spano didn't miss a thing. She is right in saying that traveling as a pilgrim gives an insight that is not possible as a tourist. I imagine that is probably true in many other places. Thank you for the article. Spano always captures more than the obvious.
WORLD
February 27, 2014
BY SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER TIMES PHOTOGRAPHS BY DON BARTLETTI he boy does not understand. His mother is not talking to him. She will not even look at him. Enrique has no hint of what she is going to do. Lourdes knows. She understands, as only a mother can, the terror she is about to inflict, the ache Enrique will feel and finally the emptiness. What will become of him? Already he will not let anyone else feed or bathe him. He loves her deeply, as only a son can. With Lourdes, he is a chatterbox.
WORLD
February 27, 2014
BY SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER TIMES PHOTOGRAPHS BY DON BARTLETTI he boy does not understand. His mother is not talking to him. She will not even look at him. Enrique has no hint of what she is going to do. Lourdes knows. She understands, as only a mother can, the terror she is about to inflict, the ache Enrique will feel and finally the emptiness. What will become of him? Already he will not let anyone else feed or bathe him. He loves her deeply, as only a son can. With Lourdes, he is a chatterbox.
TRAVEL
September 7, 2008 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
When Pope Benedict XVI visits this small town in the foothills of the French Pyrenees next weekend, he will follow in the footsteps of millions of pilgrims who have come before him. Like them, he will take Communion, drink from the holy spring and touch the stone at the base of a cliff by the Gave River, where heaven opened to a 14-year-old girl, known as Bernadette, who said she first saw the Virgin Mary there on Feb. 11, 1858. The pope will celebrate the 150th anniversary of St. Bernadette's apparitions, with a pilgrim's heart full of yearning for transformation.
TRAVEL
September 20, 2009 | Ann Herold
For my niece Rachel, it was that magical summer between high school graduation and the start of college. I hoped our trip would be the beginning of a new set of memories, the adult life realized. I had already treated a niece and nephew to graduation celebrations in Hawaii, but the islands somehow seemed the wrong fit for Rachel, a devout Catholic and, at 18, already a cancer survivor. She is a remarkable young woman, my sister Tina's middle child, who, even before her illness, had exhibited a graciousness that continued into adolescence, lifting her past the awkward it's-all-about-me stage into an early serenity.
WORLD
September 29, 2002 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The boy does not understand. His mother is not talking to him. She will not even look at him. Enrique has no hint of what she is going to do. Lourdes knows. She understands, as only a mother can, the terror she is about to inflict, the ache Enrique will feel and finally the emptiness. What will become of him? Already he will not let anyone else feed or bathe him. He loves her deeply, as only a son can. With Lourdes, he is a chatterbox. "Mira, Mami. Look, Mom," he says softly, asking her questions about everything he sees.
TRAVEL
December 24, 1989
I fail to understand the logic of the biased headline "Religion is Big Business at the Shrine of Lourdes" (Dec. 3), based on the article by Phillippe Naughton. I had the privilege of visiting Lourdes twice, spending up to 12 hours a day in prayer and public devotions--even forgoing lunch in order to treasure each spiritual moment. Pilgrims visiting Lourdes are there for the spiritual benefits. In the religious domain of Lourdes, one may obtain blessed candles and mass offerings can be made.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2008
I've read and enjoyed Susan Spano's work for at least a few years and was finally prompted to drop a note of appreciation after the story on Lourdes, France ["Slice of Heaven," Sept. 7]. My wife and I are planning our fifth trip to France next year, and we were debating whether to include Lourdes on our itinerary. Then Spano's article leaps off the front page of the Travel section. Case closed. John J. Flynn Irvine
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Madonna and her much younger boyfriend Brahim Zaibat are reportedly going their separate ways - or maybe he just aged out of the system?  Madge, 55, and Zaibat, 25, had been dating for three years, according to Us Weekly , which noted that the two got together in 2010 after he performed with his then-future squeeze's daughter, Lourdes, at the launch of her clothing line for Macy's. "It ran its course," a source told the mag about the relationship. "They were dancing and working together all the time and then they barely saw each other.
OPINION
July 13, 2013
Would Lawrence R. Krauss "recognize a miracle if one sat down and bit him on the ankle"? Reader Nathan Post wondered as much in his letter published Thursday in response to Krauss' July 8 Op-Ed article on miracles and the canonization of Pope John Paul II. Post also wrote: "Noting the dearth of miracles reported at Lourdes, France, Lawrence M. Krauss appears to make several assumptions. In a nutshell, he is saying that the number of miracles reported at Lourdes and recognized by the Roman Catholic Church as legitimate is solid evidence - almost proof - that miracles do not occur.
OPINION
July 11, 2013
Re "The trouble with miracles," Opinion, July 8 Noting the dearth of miracles reported at Lourdes, France, Lawrence M. Krauss appears to make several assumptions. In a nutshell, he is saying that the number of miracles reported at Lourdes and recognized by the Roman Catholic Church as legitimate is solid evidence - almost proof - that miracles do not occur. One thing we do know is that if a single miracle occurred at Lourdes, Krauss would be proved wrong. Another assumption Krauss appears to be making is that God is some kind of spiritual gum machine: You put something in and something comes out. If true, that would betray an incredible ignorance of the church or its thinking on the subject.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | By Lawrence M. Krauss
No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish . - David Hume Last week the Vatican announced that a meeting of cardinals and bishops had ruled that the late Pope John Paul II was responsible for a second miracle, and thus the way was cleared for sainthood. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints decided he had cured a woman from Costa Rica in 2011 after a panel of doctors apparently ruled that her recovery was otherwise inexplicable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By Corina Knoll and Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
Bell's former top administrator went to great lengths to confuse City Council members, purposely making resolutions ambiguous and complex so they'd have trouble understanding the documents, a prosecution witness in the city's corruption trial testified Friday. Lourdes Garcia, the small city's former director of administrative services, said former City Manager Robert Rizzo regarded council members as unsophisticated and easily manipulated, and disapproved when he learned that a staff member was taking an ethics class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
One of the top-ranking executives under former Bell City Administrator Robert Rizzo has been put on notice that she will be terminated as part of a leadership shake-up in a town that has been pushed to the financial edge by a still-unfolding public corruption case. Lourdes Garcia, who had earned $422,000 a year as one of Rizzo's trusted hands, becomes the latest Bell official to be forced out in the small, working-class city. Rizzo, his chief assistant, Angela Spaccia, and five former City Council members are facing felony corruption charges, accused of looting the city treasury to pay for their oversized salaries and generous retirement benefits.
OPINION
July 7, 2013 | By Lawrence M. Krauss
No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish . - David Hume Last week the Vatican announced that a meeting of cardinals and bishops had ruled that the late Pope John Paul II was responsible for a second miracle, and thus the way was cleared for sainthood. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints decided he had cured a woman from Costa Rica in 2011 after a panel of doctors apparently ruled that her recovery was otherwise inexplicable.
OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By Mollie Lowery
Lourdes was 69 years old when I first met her in 2012. She was living next to a bus stop on a busy four-lane street in front of a Silver Lake supermarket. Lourdes had claimed the spot three years earlier, after she was rousted from her encampment in Griffith Park. Before that, she'd lived in her 1973 Toyota, but it was eventually impounded because of overdue parking tickets. Lourdes was one of the folks we call "chronically homeless. " She'd been surviving on the city's margins for 20 years after losing her low-cost housing because of gentrification.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Bell's director of administrative services testified Monday that she did not realize until the city's salary scandal erupted last summer that city officials could be breaking the law by lending $1.9 million in public funds to colleagues, municipal workers and a local car dealer. Lourdes Garcia, who was given limited immunity in exchange for her testimony, said former City Administrator Robert Rizzo directed her to draft loan agreements for city employees using only their vacation and sick days as collateral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2011 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
Interrupting a witness in mid-testimony Tuesday, a judge for the second time admonished a spectator in his Los Angeles courtroom to stop giving signals to a witness in the Bell corruption hearing. This time, however, Judge Henry J. Hall ordered a bailiff to remove the husband of Lourdes Garcia, one of Bell's top financial officials. The bailiff said Jose Garcia, who was sitting in the back row, was signaling his wife as she testified about her dealings with former City Administrator Robert Rizzo and City Council members.
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