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Lourdes Baird

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1990
Before judges, prosecutors and lawyers assembled in a courtroom of the federal courthouse in Los Angeles, the new U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, Lourdes G. Baird, was officially sworn into office on Thursday. Baird, 55, a native of Ecuador and a former Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, was nominated by President Bush last May to replace U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lourdes G. Baird, an easygoing and popular lawyer who established a reputation for fairness during her short tenure as the U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, was nominated for a federal judgeship by President Bush on Thursday. The nomination had been widely rumored for months. It will be forwarded to the U.S. Senate, where it is expected that the Judiciary Committee will confirm her appointment. If Baird, 56, is confirmed, it will mark her return to the bench.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
The appointment of Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird as the new U.S. attorney for the central district of California has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Based in Los Angeles, the district is the nation's largest, spanning seven counties from Riverside to San Luis Obispo and encompassing 14 million people. Baird, 55, said she was gratified to learn Friday of the confirmation. U.S. Senator Pete Wilson (R-Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1990
Before judges, prosecutors and lawyers assembled in a courtroom of the federal courthouse in Los Angeles, the new U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, Lourdes G. Baird, was officially sworn into office on Thursday. Baird, 55, a native of Ecuador and a former Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, was nominated by President Bush last May to replace U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lourdes G. Baird, an easygoing and popular lawyer who established a reputation for fairness during her short tenure as the U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, was nominated for a federal judgeship by President Bush on Thursday. The nomination had been widely rumored for months. It will be forwarded to the U.S. Senate, where it is expected that the Judiciary Committee will confirm her appointment. If Baird, 56, is confirmed, it will mark her return to the bench.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW and LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the only contested Los Angeles County Superior Court race, voters could wind up with a new judge who does not even appear on the ballot rather than either of the two contenders actually running. The incumbent in Office No. 8 is Judge Lourdes Baird, who has been nominated by President George Bush for U.S. attorney in the Central California District. If she wins reelection Tuesday over her opponent, lawyer Mitchel J. Ezer, and is then confirmed for the federal job by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The ongoing federal grand jury investigation into Mayor Tom Bradley's financial dealings is expected to be delayed by recent developments in Michael Milken's plea bargain arrangement and the pending appointment of a U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, according to knowledgeable sources. Although the investigation began last fall, a decision on whether to charge Bradley with any criminal misconduct is not expected for several months, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird, a conservative Democrat, was nominated by President Bush on Monday for the coveted position of U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, based in Los Angeles. If confirmed by the Senate, as expected, Baird would head one of the highest-profile prosecutorial offices in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprising move, U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson has recommended that President Bush name Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird, a conservative Democrat, to the coveted job of U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, The Times learned Wednesday. Baird, 54, had been rated "exceptionally well qualified" by a special committee that Wilson uses in selecting nominees for judges and U.S. attorneys. But she was considered a dark horse because her leading rivals for the job, like Wilson and Bush, are Republicans. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1966, Lourdes Baird, a church-going Hancock Park mother of three, enrolled in night classes at Los Angeles City College, hoping to better herself but fearing that "my Blue Chip stamps would fall out of my purse and I'd be discovered for what I was." That calamity never occurred, as Baird marched through LACC, UCLA and UCLA Law School over the next decade and, at the age of 41, passed the California Bar examination on her first attempt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1966, Lourdes Baird, a church-going Hancock Park mother of three, enrolled in night classes at Los Angeles City College, hoping to better herself but fearing that "my Blue Chip stamps would fall out of my purse and I'd be discovered for what I was." That calamity never occurred, as Baird marched through LACC, UCLA and UCLA Law School over the next decade and, at the age of 41, passed the California Bar examination on her first attempt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
The appointment of Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird as the new U.S. attorney for the central district of California has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Based in Los Angeles, the district is the nation's largest, spanning seven counties from Riverside to San Luis Obispo and encompassing 14 million people. Baird, 55, said she was gratified to learn Friday of the confirmation. U.S. Senator Pete Wilson (R-Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW and LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the only contested Los Angeles County Superior Court race, voters could wind up with a new judge who does not even appear on the ballot rather than either of the two contenders actually running. The incumbent in Office No. 8 is Judge Lourdes Baird, who has been nominated by President George Bush for U.S. attorney in the Central California District. If she wins reelection Tuesday over her opponent, lawyer Mitchel J. Ezer, and is then confirmed for the federal job by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird, a conservative Democrat, was nominated by President Bush on Monday for the coveted position of U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, based in Los Angeles. If confirmed by the Senate, as expected, Baird would head one of the highest-profile prosecutorial offices in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The ongoing federal grand jury investigation into Mayor Tom Bradley's financial dealings is expected to be delayed by recent developments in Michael Milken's plea bargain arrangement and the pending appointment of a U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, according to knowledgeable sources. Although the investigation began last fall, a decision on whether to charge Bradley with any criminal misconduct is not expected for several months, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprising move, U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson has recommended that President Bush name Superior Court Judge Lourdes G. Baird, a conservative Democrat, to the coveted job of U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, The Times learned Wednesday. Baird, 54, had been rated "exceptionally well qualified" by a special committee that Wilson uses in selecting nominees for judges and U.S. attorneys. But she was considered a dark horse because her leading rivals for the job, like Wilson and Bush, are Republicans. U.S.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the nation's largest-ever trademark infringement award, a Los Angeles jury Tuesday ordered pharmaceutical giant Pfizer Inc. to pay a British company $143 million for stealing the Trovan name to market its controversial antibiotic. Legal experts called the verdict "staggering," saying it raises the stakes for companies that deliberately infringe other companies' trademarks. Jurors said Pfizer, the second-largest U.S.
NEWS
February 4, 1988
Daniel J. Pratt, 38, of La Mirada has been appointed a Municipal Court judge in the East Los Angeles Judicial District. He replaces judge Lourdes Baird, who was transferred to the Los Angeles Judicial District. Pratt has been a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney, most recently assigned to a gang prosecution unit in Norwalk. He is a 1972 graduate of California State University, Long Beach, and earned his law degree in 1977 from Western State University.
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