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Lovastatin Drug

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NEWS
September 2, 1987 | United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday authorized the sale of a cholesterol-lowering drug that could help millions of people reduce their risk of heart attacks and strokes. The prescription drug, taken as a tablet once or twice a day, is called lovastatin and will be available in two or three weeks under the brand name Mevacor. It will be marketed by Merck Sharp & Dohme of West Point, Pa. Dr. Michael Brown and Dr.
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NEWS
December 3, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A family of drugs already widely used to reduce cholesterol may provide the first effective treatment for osteoporosis, the bone-thinning disease that affects an estimated 28 million Americans. Unlike existing treatments, which merely slow or delay bone thinning, the drugs, called statins, actually increase bone density, Texas researchers report in today's Science.
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NEWS
November 1, 1987
A new triple-drug treatment has dramatically decreased cholesterol in 22 patients with severe cholesterol problems, dropping the levels of the life-threatening substance to below the national average, according to a San Francisco study. The treatment by doctors at San Francisco's Cardiovascular Research Institute included a new anti-cholesterol drug, lovastatin, combined with long-accepted cholesterol therapy using niacin and colestipol.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A popular cholesterol-lowering drug used by as many as 1 million Americans cannot only slow the progress of coronary artery disease but also reverse it, according to findings by USC researchers that could help reduce the death toll of the country's No. 1 killer. The findings emerged recently in an unpublished study of the effectiveness of the drug lovastatin in fending off the fatty deposits that can clog coronary arteries.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A family of drugs already widely used to reduce cholesterol may provide the first effective treatment for osteoporosis, the bone-thinning disease that affects an estimated 28 million Americans. Unlike existing treatments, which merely slow or delay bone thinning, the drugs, called statins, actually increase bone density, Texas researchers report in today's Science.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A popular cholesterol-lowering drug used by as many as 1 million Americans cannot only slow the progress of coronary artery disease but also reverse it, according to findings by USC researchers that could help reduce the death toll of the country's No. 1 killer. The findings emerged recently in an unpublished study of the effectiveness of the drug lovastatin in fending off the fatty deposits that can clog coronary arteries.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | United Press International
Four out of every five middle-aged American men run the risk of dying prematurely from heart disease because of unhealthy levels of cholesterol in their blood, researchers reported Thursday. The research, based on a landmark study of more than 350,000 men, found that even moderate levels of blood cholesterol boost the odds of death from heart disease and that the danger is present even in men who do not smoke or have high blood pressure.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Democratic vice presidential nominee Lloyd Bentsen's gross income averaged $772,181 over the last five years and he paid an average of $264,453 in federal taxes during the same period, according to financial records released today by the Texas senator. Bentsen, 67, also made public a blind trust and released a report from his doctor saying he was "in excellent health."
NEWS
November 1, 1987
A new triple-drug treatment has dramatically decreased cholesterol in 22 patients with severe cholesterol problems, dropping the levels of the life-threatening substance to below the national average, according to a San Francisco study. The treatment by doctors at San Francisco's Cardiovascular Research Institute included a new anti-cholesterol drug, lovastatin, combined with long-accepted cholesterol therapy using niacin and colestipol.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday authorized the sale of a cholesterol-lowering drug that could help millions of people reduce their risk of heart attacks and strokes. The prescription drug, taken as a tablet once or twice a day, is called lovastatin and will be available in two or three weeks under the brand name Mevacor. It will be marketed by Merck Sharp & Dohme of West Point, Pa. Dr. Michael Brown and Dr.
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