Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLove And Care
IN THE NEWS

Love And Care

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989
Regarding the statement "This nostalgia is heightened around the holidays, when some contemporary households sit down to meager tables of four or five or less--hardly enough people to pick the smallest turkey clean": I grew up in a household of four (myself, my brother, my mother and father), and our table was hardly meager. We had as much love and care between the four of us as the Francos. It is not size alone that creates a family. KATHLEEN PHILLIPS Redondo Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Who says that only Americans know how to play Gershwin?" asks Gramophone magazine this month as it hails a new Gershwin CD from the Leipzig Gewandhaus, the German orchestra that calls itself the world's oldest. "By this time possibly nobody," the British record guide answers its rhetorical self. But if you ain't got that swing .... The Leipzigers' new recording of "Rhapsody in Blue" and the Piano Concerto in F features the ancient orchestra's current music director, Riccardo Chailly, and pianist Stefano Bollani.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1995
Diana Beard-Williams' Valley Commentary article "Adoption Rules Should Not Be Black or White" (June 4) hit the mark regarding placing the needs of the child over racial barriers. Government should be encouraging parents to adopt a child, regardless of race, color or creed. There are over 60,000 children in Los Angeles County's protective custody, of which 50% are minority. Our main goal needs to be placing children in loving, nurturing homes with parents, regardless of their ethnic heritage, who will instill values and morals and who will cherish their children as all children deserve to be cherished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense attorneys attempting to save Socorro Caro from death by injection rested their case Wednesday, capping weeks of testimony with praise for the convicted child-killer from her aunt, one of her sons' teachers and a jail chaplain. They were the last in a string of defense witnesses to describe the 44-year-old Santa Rosa Valley woman as loving and compassionate. Caro was convicted last month of first-degree murder for shooting three of her four young sons as they slept.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
It was with great chagrin that I read your recent three-part series on teen pregnancy. While you provided a sympathetic view concerning the how and why, you failed to discuss some other relevant issues. To suggest that these kids can exercise any sort of "control" over their lives by reproducing is selfish and shortsighted. In no way can these teen parents be considered self-sufficient or in charge of their lives enough to take care of their children without the help of unwilling taxpayers.
NEWS
November 7, 1985
I'm responding to Darlene Chappell's letter of Oct. 17. Thank you for being concerned about my safety when I am riding in my owner's truck. I was just posing for the photographer in the picture you saw in The Times. I am always chained, on a short enough chain so I can't go over the side and hang myself, just behind the cab of the truck. So you see, Darlene, you don't need to worry about me. But I'm glad you wrote that letter because I have seen other dogs, whose people don't love them as much as mine love me, fall out of the back of trucks and I think it is very sad and wasteful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986
I salute Cindy Trane Christeson and add a hearty "amen" to her Commentary, "A Child With Special Attributes" (Aug. 31). As a professional who has been privileged to work with children who have Down's syndrome, I know some of the special joys these children can bring to their families and others. Had Mark and Susan Robinson's child been born "normal," what guarantee would they have that at some point in his life, Brent would not take an "extensive, emotional toll" on his parents?
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Perennial flowers are gaining in popularity. The sense of permanence they bring to a garden is not immediate, though. Many perennials need about three years to settle in, spread and bloom abundantly. Dramatic 5-foot spikes of delphiniums, arching waves of orange day lilies, and creeping sunny yellow flowers of helianthemum are well worth the wait. Just because perennials come up every year doesn't mean they need no care.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Although the cast assembled in Anaheim Hills last Saturday numbered only in the hundreds, and the goal was not to build Rome in a day, the spectacle was inspiring. In the morning, there was a virtually empty field. By sunset, Canyon Acres Residential Center for physically and sexually abused children looked like a cross between a dude ranch and summer camp. While the children were away on a camping trip, 570 volunteers from nearly 40 Orange County corporations gathered at the 4.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Who says that only Americans know how to play Gershwin?" asks Gramophone magazine this month as it hails a new Gershwin CD from the Leipzig Gewandhaus, the German orchestra that calls itself the world's oldest. "By this time possibly nobody," the British record guide answers its rhetorical self. But if you ain't got that swing .... The Leipzigers' new recording of "Rhapsody in Blue" and the Piano Concerto in F features the ancient orchestra's current music director, Riccardo Chailly, and pianist Stefano Bollani.
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 1999 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Perennial flowers are gaining in popularity. The sense of permanence they bring to a garden is not immediate, though. Many perennials need about three years to settle in, spread and bloom abundantly. Dramatic 5-foot spikes of delphiniums, arching waves of orange day lilies, and creeping sunny yellow flowers of helianthemum are well worth the wait. Just because perennials come up every year doesn't mean they need no care.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | PATRICIA DAVIS, WASHINGTON POST
It's 1:30 a.m., and both alarm clocks in Kristin Kierig's bedroom are ringing. As she eases out from under her warm, furry blanket, 114 pairs of sleepy eyes blink in the darkness. Kierig won't be leaving for her job for eight hours, but the 46-year-old Navy program analyst has risen early--as she does every day--to tend to her large family. "Hi, precious, my baby boy," she purrs. "Good morning, Jessica." Over the last eight years, Kierig has shared her Fairfax County, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1995
Diana Beard-Williams' Valley Commentary article "Adoption Rules Should Not Be Black or White" (June 4) hit the mark regarding placing the needs of the child over racial barriers. Government should be encouraging parents to adopt a child, regardless of race, color or creed. There are over 60,000 children in Los Angeles County's protective custody, of which 50% are minority. Our main goal needs to be placing children in loving, nurturing homes with parents, regardless of their ethnic heritage, who will instill values and morals and who will cherish their children as all children deserve to be cherished.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
It was with great chagrin that I read your recent three-part series on teen pregnancy. While you provided a sympathetic view concerning the how and why, you failed to discuss some other relevant issues. To suggest that these kids can exercise any sort of "control" over their lives by reproducing is selfish and shortsighted. In no way can these teen parents be considered self-sufficient or in charge of their lives enough to take care of their children without the help of unwilling taxpayers.
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989
Regarding the statement "This nostalgia is heightened around the holidays, when some contemporary households sit down to meager tables of four or five or less--hardly enough people to pick the smallest turkey clean": I grew up in a household of four (myself, my brother, my mother and father), and our table was hardly meager. We had as much love and care between the four of us as the Francos. It is not size alone that creates a family. KATHLEEN PHILLIPS Redondo Beach
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Although the cast assembled in Anaheim Hills last Saturday numbered only in the hundreds, and the goal was not to build Rome in a day, the spectacle was inspiring. In the morning, there was a virtually empty field. By sunset, Canyon Acres Residential Center for physically and sexually abused children looked like a cross between a dude ranch and summer camp. While the children were away on a camping trip, 570 volunteers from nearly 40 Orange County corporations gathered at the 4.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | PATRICIA DAVIS, WASHINGTON POST
It's 1:30 a.m., and both alarm clocks in Kristin Kierig's bedroom are ringing. As she eases out from under her warm, furry blanket, 114 pairs of sleepy eyes blink in the darkness. Kierig won't be leaving for her job for eight hours, but the 46-year-old Navy program analyst has risen early--as she does every day--to tend to her large family. "Hi, precious, my baby boy," she purrs. "Good morning, Jessica." Over the last eight years, Kierig has shared her Fairfax County, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense attorneys attempting to save Socorro Caro from death by injection rested their case Wednesday, capping weeks of testimony with praise for the convicted child-killer from her aunt, one of her sons' teachers and a jail chaplain. They were the last in a string of defense witnesses to describe the 44-year-old Santa Rosa Valley woman as loving and compassionate. Caro was convicted last month of first-degree murder for shooting three of her four young sons as they slept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986
I salute Cindy Trane Christeson and add a hearty "amen" to her Commentary, "A Child With Special Attributes" (Aug. 31). As a professional who has been privileged to work with children who have Down's syndrome, I know some of the special joys these children can bring to their families and others. Had Mark and Susan Robinson's child been born "normal," what guarantee would they have that at some point in his life, Brent would not take an "extensive, emotional toll" on his parents?
NEWS
November 7, 1985
I'm responding to Darlene Chappell's letter of Oct. 17. Thank you for being concerned about my safety when I am riding in my owner's truck. I was just posing for the photographer in the picture you saw in The Times. I am always chained, on a short enough chain so I can't go over the side and hang myself, just behind the cab of the truck. So you see, Darlene, you don't need to worry about me. But I'm glad you wrote that letter because I have seen other dogs, whose people don't love them as much as mine love me, fall out of the back of trucks and I think it is very sad and wasteful.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|