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December 19, 1993 | Lucy Gray, In Lucy Gray's closet there is also a book for all ages, written by her and titled, "Gentlemen Prefer Their Mothers."
A mother's preschool child is sitting on her lap. She's reading him a story. The words are gliding and hissing and floating off her tongue. She loves Maira Kalman's "Max in Love" at least as much as her child does. She must have read it 50 times, but she keeps finding new wit in the pictures, fresh meaning in the characters. Her appreciation is infectious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Gillian Flynn's "Gone Girl" is one of those bestselling novels that's making a swift transition to movie screens. The thriller first went to No. 1 on The Times' bestseller list in June 2012 and in October of this year it'll be in theaters. Starring Ben Affleck, no less, as the golden-boy-turned-suspect Nick Dunne. The first trailer for the film debuted this week; see it here . It makes clear what the movie is about: Perfect couple, wife goes missing, and husband remembers halcyon scenes but -- something is amiss.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Carmela Ciuraru
There are people who love books, people who love to collect books and people who love books, particularly rare ones, so much that they're willing to steal them. Books coveted by collectors can be quite valuable -- say, a first Italian edition of "Pinocchio" ($80,000) or the first-edition "Lolita" that Vladimir Nabokov inscribed to his friend Graham Greene, which fetched $264,000 at auction. In "The Man Who Loved Books Too Much," Allison Hoover Bartlett immerses herself in the fascinating world of antiquarian books, where provenance is an obsession and treasure hunters perpetually seek the next big prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The L.A. Times Festival of Books is on the horizon -- April 21-22, to be exact. In the coming weeks, we'll be talking to some of the authors who will be there; the first is bestselling novelist Lisa See. The author of "Dreams of Joy," "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan," "Peony in Love," "Shanghai Girls" and "On Gold Mountain" was born in Paris, brought up in Los Angeles, and writes about the intersection of American and Chinese cultures. Her latest novel, "Dreams of Joy," looks back at China's troubled Great Leap Forward of the 1950s.
BOOKS
December 10, 1989
Your Book Review (of Nov. 26) is a wonderful Christmas gift to all who read the Los Angeles Times and love books. This is the best use of color illustrations in newspapers yet. Everyone I have talked to says, "Bravo!" KAREN S. LANGLOIS PASADENA
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996
"Phonics Is Best Aid for Reading, Study Shows" (May 4) validates what well-meaning educators have known for years. An early exposure to phonics instruction helps kids decode, comprehend and read better. On the other hand, we cannot underestimate the benefits of a whole-language program. An intensive daily drill in phonics is not enough. Children have to be able to make an immediate connection to the sounds they just learned. This is where the role of quality children's literature comes in. A language arts program such as Open Court combines both approaches and is able to address the different learning modalities of all children.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
If you love books, or know a little about the publishing industry, here are 10 reasons why Steve Hely's first novel, "How I Became a Famous Novelist" (Grove Atlantic/Black Cat: 322 pp., $14 paper), will hit you like "This Is Spinal Tap." In fact, in honor of Spinal Tap, let's crank that number to 11. 1. Hely has written for David Letterman and has a dry, sharp wit. 2. If anyone can write a rollicking satire of the publishing world, this is the guy. 3. Hely's protagonist, Pete Tarslaw, is an underemployed, underwashed liberal arts slacker who cooks up the idea of becoming a famous novelist to make his soon-to-be-married ex-girlfriend jealous.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The L.A. Times Festival of Books is on the horizon -- April 21-22, to be exact. In the coming weeks, we'll be talking to some of the authors who will be there; the first is bestselling novelist Lisa See. The author of "Dreams of Joy," "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan," "Peony in Love," "Shanghai Girls" and "On Gold Mountain" was born in Paris, brought up in Los Angeles, and writes about the intersection of American and Chinese cultures. Her latest novel, "Dreams of Joy," looks back at China's troubled Great Leap Forward of the 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2002 | Nita Lelyveld, Times Staff Writer
There were no books in Alicia Flores' childhood home in Mexico. The only ones she saw were at school. By ninth grade, when she went to work in the Zacatecas cornfields, school and schoolbooks were over for her. No one ever read Flores a story -- not once. So now when the 30-year-old mother tries to read to her two small daughters, she has no model. She lacks confidence. "I don't know what to do," she said softly in Spanish. "I want them to love books."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
When the news hit this week that Amazon was releasing a Kindle for iPhone, I jumped to get it. No matter how much I love books, I'd developed a definite longing for the Kindle. It was partly my fondness for new technologies, partly the (perhaps late) realization that e-readers are likely here to stay and partly, no doubt, Amazon's successful hype over the Kindle 2. And this was a way to get a taste of the Kindle without shelling out the $359. So I went to the iTunes store and downloaded the free Kindle app. Then I looked around iTunes trying to find an e-book to read.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It's almost as if Kevin Smokler found himself in 30-something detention: well into adulthood, he was sentenced to go back and re-read the books he read in high school English class. He might have escaped if he hadn't been passing notes in class written that book proposal.  " Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread 50 Books you Haven't Touched Since High School ,"  officially lands in bookstores today. In it, Smokler returns to Herman Melville's "Bartleby, The Scrivener," George Orwell's "Animal Farm," "A Separate Peace" by John Knowles and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatby," perennial favorites of English teachers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
When my father was 13 his mother kidnapped him from a small town in Guatemala. This bold act liberated my father from a cruel and abusive stepmother - but it also brought an end to his education. My grandmother took her son to Guatemala City, where soon he went to work sweeping floors at a pharmacy. During the school-free years that followed, someone gave my father a book he grew to treasure. "I read it so much, I wore out the pages," he tells me. That book was a history of the Roman Empire.
WORLD
September 14, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
HONG KONG - As the final call for the flight to Beijing crackles over the public address system, Zhang Qian flips through the pages of a book on display across from the boarding gate at the Hong Kong airport. When somebody looks over his shoulder, Zhang closes the book sheepishly as though he was caught peeking at pornography. Actually, it's a biography of Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, one of dozens of titles on Chinese politics available in Hong Kong. "Just looking," said Zhang, a businessman from the Chinese city of Qingdao, as he reluctantly put the book back on the shelf.
OPINION
January 28, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Brewster Kahle has the gleeful air of a man who has just found something wonderful and wants to tell his friends all about it. And his friends are the 2 billion people, and counting, who are on the Internet every day. What he has found -- or more accurately, crafted -- are the means and the mechanisms to preserve the human record, the whole human record, in its many media, so other humans can get to it with a tap or a mouse click, on www.internetarchive.org ...
OPINION
April 23, 2011 | Patt Morrison
For Ken Brecher to say that being the president of the Library Foundation of Los Angeles is the best job he's ever had -- well, that speaks volumes. Consider that he's run the Sundance Institute, the Boston Children's Museum and a major Philadelphia philanthropy; that he's an anthropologist with a Rhodes scholarship and two research tours in the Amazon on his resume. The British playwright Christopher Hampton used Brecher's field notes for his play "Savages. " He landed in Los Angeles as a theatrical "anthropologist in residence" -- a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Carmela Ciuraru
There are people who love books, people who love to collect books and people who love books, particularly rare ones, so much that they're willing to steal them. Books coveted by collectors can be quite valuable -- say, a first Italian edition of "Pinocchio" ($80,000) or the first-edition "Lolita" that Vladimir Nabokov inscribed to his friend Graham Greene, which fetched $264,000 at auction. In "The Man Who Loved Books Too Much," Allison Hoover Bartlett immerses herself in the fascinating world of antiquarian books, where provenance is an obsession and treasure hunters perpetually seek the next big prize.
OPINION
December 8, 2004
Re "Big Social Cost in the High Price of Books," Voices, Dec. 4: I think G. Lloyd Helm's worry about the high price of books is misplaced. If one has the desire to read and seek knowledge, there is an abundance of books to be had for little or no money. There is a glut of used books out there, and for $25 you can probably get a two-foot stack of hardbacks that were in Barnes & Noble last year. Social concern should be about the demand for literature and not what publishers decide to charge for new material.
OPINION
January 28, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Brewster Kahle has the gleeful air of a man who has just found something wonderful and wants to tell his friends all about it. And his friends are the 2 billion people, and counting, who are on the Internet every day. What he has found -- or more accurately, crafted -- are the means and the mechanisms to preserve the human record, the whole human record, in its many media, so other humans can get to it with a tap or a mouse click, on www.internetarchive.org ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
If you love books, or know a little about the publishing industry, here are 10 reasons why Steve Hely's first novel, "How I Became a Famous Novelist" (Grove Atlantic/Black Cat: 322 pp., $14 paper), will hit you like "This Is Spinal Tap." In fact, in honor of Spinal Tap, let's crank that number to 11. 1. Hely has written for David Letterman and has a dry, sharp wit. 2. If anyone can write a rollicking satire of the publishing world, this is the guy. 3. Hely's protagonist, Pete Tarslaw, is an underemployed, underwashed liberal arts slacker who cooks up the idea of becoming a famous novelist to make his soon-to-be-married ex-girlfriend jealous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Army Spec. Armando A. De La Paz Jr. and Wally Longshore, a retired campaign publicist, never knew each other. It's likely that Longshore, 81, never would have known De La Paz's name if the young man had not lost his life to injuries suffered in a vehicle rollover in Iraq. But, in his death, De La Paz, 21, has made a lasting impression on Longshore. De La Paz died Nov. 13, 2008, in Baghdad; the circumstances of his death are still under investigation.
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