Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLove Canal Ny
IN THE NEWS

Love Canal Ny

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a big step toward closing a case that raised the nation's concern about buried toxic waste, Occidental Chemical Corp. agreed Tuesday to pay the state of New York $98 million to settle one of the key civil lawsuits over Love Canal. The company also agreed to take over monitoring and cleanup of the Niagara Falls, N.Y., neighborhood--a chore that the New York attorney general's office estimates will cost an additional $25 million over the next 30 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Occidental Chemical Corp. and Olin Corp. reached a $7.1-million settlement in the last of four cases in the Love Canal area of Niagara Falls, N.Y., the site of one of the most famous U.S. toxic waste disasters. For cleanup costs, the companies will reimburse the federal government $6 million and the state of New York $610,000, and will pay $500,000 for damaging natural resources, federal and state agencies said in Washington, D.C.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a 16-year legal case that became synonymous with toxic pollution, the Clinton administration announced Thursday that Occidental Chemical Corp. has agreed to pay $129 million to the federal government for its cost of cleaning up the Love Canal neighborhood near Niagara Falls. The settlement is one of the biggest enforcement actions pursued by the government under the Superfund law, the Environmental Protection Agency said.
NEWS
December 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a 16-year legal case that became synonymous with toxic pollution, the Clinton administration announced Thursday that Occidental Chemical Corp. has agreed to pay $129 million to the federal government for its cost of cleaning up the Love Canal neighborhood near Niagara Falls. The settlement is one of the biggest enforcement actions pursued by the government under the Superfund law, the Environmental Protection Agency said.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
NEWS
June 2, 1989
Occidental Chemical Corp. has for the first time agreed to take some responsibility for cleaning up chemical contamination at the old Love Canal industrial dump area, officials said. Occidental has signed a consent agreement that calls for it to take over disposal of toxic wastes excavated from two creeks near the neighborhood in Niagara Falls, N.Y. An Occidental subsidiary, Hooker Chemical Co., used an abandoned waterway project as a chemical dump in the 1940s. Homes were built on the covered-over dump in the 1960s.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Niagara Falls, N.Y., judge ruled that the sale of homes in the Love Canal chemical dump area may proceed, rejecting a bid by environmental and community groups to block the sales. State Justice Joseph Mintz lifted an injunction he imposed four years ago that forbade selling the homes until the state Health Department had studied whether the area was habitable. That study, finished last year, said contamination in a part of the area was no worse than in other parts of Niagara Falls.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Occidental Chemical Corp. and Olin Corp. reached a $7.1-million settlement in the last of four cases in the Love Canal area of Niagara Falls, N.Y., the site of one of the most famous U.S. toxic waste disasters. For cleanup costs, the companies will reimburse the federal government $6 million and the state of New York $610,000, and will pay $500,000 for damaging natural resources, federal and state agencies said in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Occidental Chemical Corp. does not have to pay New York punitive damages for the Love Canal contamination that forced hundreds of people to abandon their homes, a judge ruled Thursday. New York had sought penalties of up to $250 million from Occidental, the corporate successor to Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corp., which dumped 22,000 tons of hazardous waste at Love Canal in the 1940s and 1950s. But U.S.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a big step toward closing a case that raised the nation's concern about buried toxic waste, Occidental Chemical Corp. agreed Tuesday to pay the state of New York $98 million to settle one of the key civil lawsuits over Love Canal. The company also agreed to take over monitoring and cleanup of the Niagara Falls, N.Y., neighborhood--a chore that the New York attorney general's office estimates will cost an additional $25 million over the next 30 years.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Occidental Chemical Corp. does not have to pay New York punitive damages for the Love Canal contamination that forced hundreds of people to abandon their homes, a judge ruled Thursday. New York had sought penalties of up to $250 million from Occidental, the corporate successor to Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corp., which dumped 22,000 tons of hazardous waste at Love Canal in the 1940s and 1950s. But U.S.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Niagara Falls, N.Y., judge ruled that the sale of homes in the Love Canal chemical dump area may proceed, rejecting a bid by environmental and community groups to block the sales. State Justice Joseph Mintz lifted an injunction he imposed four years ago that forbade selling the homes until the state Health Department had studied whether the area was habitable. That study, finished last year, said contamination in a part of the area was no worse than in other parts of Niagara Falls.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Home-seekers flocked to the neighborhood surrounding the Love Canal toxic-waste dump Wednesday as a state agency put nine houses up for sale but refused to guarantee their safety in writing. "The area's been real quiet. It'll be nice to get neighbors back," said William Stevenson, one of about 70 people who stayed in the neighborhood rather than accept a government buyout during the late 1970s.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Home-seekers flocked to the neighborhood surrounding the Love Canal toxic-waste dump Wednesday as a state agency put nine houses up for sale but refused to guarantee their safety in writing. "The area's been real quiet. It'll be nice to get neighbors back," said William Stevenson, one of about 70 people who stayed in the neighborhood rather than accept a government buyout during the late 1970s.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | Associated Press
State officials declared Tuesday that it is safe for hundreds of former residents to return to Love Canal, the neighborhood that became notorious for its chemical contamination. State Health Commissioner Dr. David Axelrod said most areas of Love Canal now contain no more chemicals than other parts of the industrial city. He said, however, that some blocks, where about 10 families lived, were still hazardous.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | From United Press International
A federal district court judge ruled that Occidental Chemical Corp. can be held liable for punitive damages at Love Canal, as well as for compensation for cleaning up the toxic chemical dump. The ruling, released Monday, sets the stage for additional trials on whether other parties must share Occidental's liability and on how much the company will pay in damages, a spokeswoman for state Atty. Gen. Robert Abrams said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|