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Love Story Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1998 | JENNIFER NAPIER-PEARCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between a morning spent working with a sound mixer and an evening counseling pregnant teens in South-Central, independent filmmaker Vincent Jay Miller takes time for a late lunch in Van Nuys to talk about "Gabriela." As his pasta gets cold, he describes how he pieced together the resources to produce his first feature film. How he unabashedly solicited funds from family, friends and acquaintances, including his optometrist and high school wrestling coach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You never have to say you're sorry if you admit you love "Love Story." In fact, since its release in 1970, audiences have wept buckets when Ali MacGraw's feisty Radcliffe graduate, Jenny, dies in the arms of her beloved Harvard-preppie husband, Oliver Barrett IV, played by the boyishly handsome Ryan O'Neal. "Love Story" captured the hearts of moviegoers and became a cultural phenomenon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You never have to say you're sorry if you admit you love "Love Story." In fact, since its release in 1970, audiences have wept buckets when Ali MacGraw's feisty Radcliffe graduate, Jenny, dies in the arms of her beloved Harvard-preppie husband, Oliver Barrett IV, played by the boyishly handsome Ryan O'Neal. "Love Story" captured the hearts of moviegoers and became a cultural phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Try pitching this story to a major Hollywood studio: Suburban white girl moves to the inner city and enrolls in a nearly all-black school. White girl and black boy fall in love. Her friends don't like it, neither do his. But in the end, love is blind, and they live happily ever after. Most likely, you will get a polite "Thanks. We'll call you." But before you are pushed out of the executive's office, you add the clincher: It's a dance movie. Suddenly, you are invited to sit back down.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Try pitching this story to a major Hollywood studio: Suburban white girl moves to the inner city and enrolls in a nearly all-black school. White girl and black boy fall in love. Her friends don't like it, neither do his. But in the end, love is blind, and they live happily ever after. Most likely, you will get a polite "Thanks. We'll call you." But before you are pushed out of the executive's office, you add the clincher: It's a dance movie. Suddenly, you are invited to sit back down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Elaine Woo
Erich Segal, a Yale University classics professor whose first novel, the weepy "Love Story," became a pop-culture phenomenon, selling more than 20 million copies in three dozen languages and spawning an iconic catchphrase of the 1970s, died Sunday in London. He was 72. Segal had Parkinson's disease and died of a heart attack, his daughter, Francesca Segal, told the Associated Press. "What can you say about a 25-year-old girl who died?" Segal wrote in the first line of the 1970 novel about star-crossed lovers, played in the blockbuster 1970 movie by Ali McGraw and Ryan O'Neal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker look and act, quite attractively, like grown-ups, and their easy rapport makes them convincing and appealing as an on-screen couple. So all throughout "Failure to Launch," I found myself wishing they were in a different movie, maybe one as sophisticated as "The Philadelphia Story," which the movie references, but doesn't remotely live up to.
IMAGE
August 31, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Times Staff Writer
September in L.A. is the cruelest month for a coat fiend like me. Temperatures laze in the 80s during the day, which makes buying a chic camel-hair swing coat about as daft as owning a beach towel in Anchorage. Nevermind the other East Coast sartorial staples -- fitted turtle necks and ribbed tights -- that taunt this N.Y. expat. Mostly, it's the coat I crave. Ten years in L.A. hasn't quelled my addiction to that jolt of static electricity that comes from friction with wool. Or the tickle of twill on my neck.
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twenty-eight years ago, novelist and filmmaker Roger L. Simon was sitting in the backyard of his Echo Park home with a friend who'd just become the top editor at Straight Arrow Books, Rolling Stone magazine's new publishing venture. They were discussing the manuscript for Simon's third novel, his first two having "virtually no sales." "The book was about a veteran of the Bay of Pigs invasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | STEPHEN FARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid a somewhat disheartening movie year, there is at least one hopeful sign: Ensemble movies, long shunned by major actors and directors, are making a comeback. By the end of this month, four impressive ensemble movies will be playing in theaters: "What's Cooking?"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1998 | JENNIFER NAPIER-PEARCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between a morning spent working with a sound mixer and an evening counseling pregnant teens in South-Central, independent filmmaker Vincent Jay Miller takes time for a late lunch in Van Nuys to talk about "Gabriela." As his pasta gets cold, he describes how he pieced together the resources to produce his first feature film. How he unabashedly solicited funds from family, friends and acquaintances, including his optometrist and high school wrestling coach.
NEWS
July 2, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hollywood was stunned late last month when the youth-oriented action film "The Fast and the Furious" streaked past the competition to become the No. 1 movie, with $40.1 million in ticket sales.
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