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Love Triangle

NEWS
May 8, 1989 | CAROLYN SEE
Tangled Up in Blue by Larry Duplechan (St. Martin's Press: $16.95; 288 pages) "Tangled Up in Blue" is so tangled up in a web of blurb-misrepresentation that it will be a wonder if it ever finds its real audience. On the other hand, this book is so primitively written, so cliche-ridden, that that might not be a total misfortune. That, in turn, brings up another question: Must sexual and sociological matters always be dealt with in the loftiest prose? Must ill-educated human beings be denied literature that speaks their own language?
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NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Cindy Bertram, Special to The Times
I live in Santa Monica -- blocks from the beach, fabulous restaurants, fun bars and great shopping. I also happen to live on a street that requires a permit to park. You know how it's such a big deal to give someone that you are dating the key to your house? You labor over the decision; after all, giving up that key is a sign of true intimacy. Not the case in Santa Monica. What is much more coveted is the ever-worshiped parking permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and relatives of Sherri Dally recalled her attempts to hold together a marriage slowly being torn apart by the adulterous affair between her husband, Michael, and his mistress, Diana Haun. A former girlfriend of Michael Dally testified that he once talked about wanting to stab his wife to escape a marriage that made him feel trapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of its length "Sleep With Me," directed by first-timer Rory Kelly, offers up maundering set pieces involving its young actors carousing, yelling, arguing. Talking nonstop is a tic they can't shake. Is the talk worth listening to? That depends on who is talking and when. The film's gimmick is that six screenwriters--all friends, each contributing a separate segment--worked on it independently.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The first words in Abbas Kiarostami's sinuous and beguiling new drama are "I'm not lying to you," and they're a lie. There'll be more equivocation and feints, more quietly disorienting shifts as the Tokyo-set story's events play out among an unlikely - and well-cast - triangle. A filmmaker long fascinated with matters of truth, fiction and identity, Kiarostami embarks on a typically indirect but never rambling path in "Like Someone in Love," crafting an elegant mystery that resonates beyond its final, jolting moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2006 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
Murderous seductress? Or an innocent young woman with a jealous boyfriend? Lawyers in Orange County Superior Court on Monday painted sharply different portraits of murder defendant Veronica Paz, 24, who is accused of luring a high school wrestler to a local lovers' lane, where he was shot and then set afire by her sometime boyfriend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were friends who became rivals for the same woman, a love triangle that exploded in December when Thomas Minn fired two bullets into Paul Hangen's head. Minn, a 37-year-old former Anaheim motorcycle officer, now faces a jury whose job will be to decide not whether he killed his one-time housemate, but why. "This is no whodunit. Tom Minn shot the guy," said Minn's defense attorney, James A. Stotler, during opening statements Monday in Riverside County Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Julian Hernandez's beautiful "Broken Sky" is that increasing rarity, a film that is fully realized visually. Keeping dialogue at a minimum, Hernandez and inspired cinematographer Alejandro Cantu create a constant interplay between light and shadow, movement and stillness, dramatic spaces of architectural grandeur and intimate enclosures to evoke the ever-shifting emotions of an all-consuming first love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
In her latest novel, Ursula Hegi doesn't waste time building a complex plot up to a suspenseful climax. Instead, she lays out the turmoil in the very first sentence, with the occurrence of a suicide. Thus the suspense lies in the ambiguity of her title, "The Worst Thing I've Done." It's a phrase that could be uttered by any of her three central characters -- Mason, Annie and Jake -- who are caught in an unhappy and often confusing love triangle.
BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.
ZOE HELLER'S second novel takes an English school sex scandal involving salacious headlines and class consciousness and elevates it, with the aid of a self-deluding narrator and piercing observations, to a nuanced portrait of the power plays in unbalanced relationships. "What Was She Thinking?" shares many qualities with Kazuo Ishiguro's "The Remains of the Day," not least its quintessential Britishness and a narrator leading a narrow existence who mourns the Good Old Days.
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