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Love Triangle

NEWS
May 8, 1989 | CAROLYN SEE
Tangled Up in Blue by Larry Duplechan (St. Martin's Press: $16.95; 288 pages) "Tangled Up in Blue" is so tangled up in a web of blurb-misrepresentation that it will be a wonder if it ever finds its real audience. On the other hand, this book is so primitively written, so cliche-ridden, that that might not be a total misfortune. That, in turn, brings up another question: Must sexual and sociological matters always be dealt with in the loftiest prose? Must ill-educated human beings be denied literature that speaks their own language?
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NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Cindy Bertram, Special to The Times
I live in Santa Monica -- blocks from the beach, fabulous restaurants, fun bars and great shopping. I also happen to live on a street that requires a permit to park. You know how it's such a big deal to give someone that you are dating the key to your house? You labor over the decision; after all, giving up that key is a sign of true intimacy. Not the case in Santa Monica. What is much more coveted is the ever-worshiped parking permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and relatives of Sherri Dally recalled her attempts to hold together a marriage slowly being torn apart by the adulterous affair between her husband, Michael, and his mistress, Diana Haun. A former girlfriend of Michael Dally testified that he once talked about wanting to stab his wife to escape a marriage that made him feel trapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of its length "Sleep With Me," directed by first-timer Rory Kelly, offers up maundering set pieces involving its young actors carousing, yelling, arguing. Talking nonstop is a tic they can't shake. Is the talk worth listening to? That depends on who is talking and when. The film's gimmick is that six screenwriters--all friends, each contributing a separate segment--worked on it independently.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Julian Hernandez's beautiful "Broken Sky" is that increasing rarity, a film that is fully realized visually. Keeping dialogue at a minimum, Hernandez and inspired cinematographer Alejandro Cantu create a constant interplay between light and shadow, movement and stillness, dramatic spaces of architectural grandeur and intimate enclosures to evoke the ever-shifting emotions of an all-consuming first love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were friends who became rivals for the same woman, a love triangle that exploded in December when Thomas Minn fired two bullets into Paul Hangen's head. Minn, a 37-year-old former Anaheim motorcycle officer, now faces a jury whose job will be to decide not whether he killed his one-time housemate, but why. "This is no whodunit. Tom Minn shot the guy," said Minn's defense attorney, James A. Stotler, during opening statements Monday in Riverside County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2006 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
Murderous seductress? Or an innocent young woman with a jealous boyfriend? Lawyers in Orange County Superior Court on Monday painted sharply different portraits of murder defendant Veronica Paz, 24, who is accused of luring a high school wrestler to a local lovers' lane, where he was shot and then set afire by her sometime boyfriend.
BOOKS
August 3, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a member of the National Book Critics Circle.
ZOE HELLER'S second novel takes an English school sex scandal involving salacious headlines and class consciousness and elevates it, with the aid of a self-deluding narrator and piercing observations, to a nuanced portrait of the power plays in unbalanced relationships. "What Was She Thinking?" shares many qualities with Kazuo Ishiguro's "The Remains of the Day," not least its quintessential Britishness and a narrator leading a narrow existence who mourns the Good Old Days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
In her latest novel, Ursula Hegi doesn't waste time building a complex plot up to a suspenseful climax. Instead, she lays out the turmoil in the very first sentence, with the occurrence of a suicide. Thus the suspense lies in the ambiguity of her title, "The Worst Thing I've Done." It's a phrase that could be uttered by any of her three central characters -- Mason, Annie and Jake -- who are caught in an unhappy and often confusing love triangle.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The first words in Abbas Kiarostami's sinuous and beguiling new drama are "I'm not lying to you," and they're a lie. There'll be more equivocation and feints, more quietly disorienting shifts as the Tokyo-set story's events play out among an unlikely - and well-cast - triangle. A filmmaker long fascinated with matters of truth, fiction and identity, Kiarostami embarks on a typically indirect but never rambling path in "Like Someone in Love," crafting an elegant mystery that resonates beyond its final, jolting moment.
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