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Low Calorie Diet

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HEALTH
September 10, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
Putting elderly mice on a very low-calorie diet for as little as four weeks reversed many of the changes in the activity of various genes that had occurred during normal aging, according to a new study. The research, which used a new technology to pinpoint which genes are active in mice at different ages, may help scientists understand how calorie restriction extends animals' lifespan and, eventually, to develop longevity therapies for humans.
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NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
"The Biggest Loser" winner John Rhode is happy he nabbed the grand prize after shedding 220 pounds, but he's also worried he might gain the weight back, and he's not alone. Most people who lose weight eventually gain some, all or all plus more of it back in endless cycles of yo-yo diets. "He admitted he has a food addiction ," says Felicia Stoler , a New York-based registered dietitian, exercise physiologist and author of "Living Skinny in Fat Genes: The Healthy Way to Lose Weight and Feel Great.
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NEWS
May 7, 1989 | DANIEL Q. HANEY, Associated Press
Should kids catch cholesterol phobia? Certainly it's going around. For lots of grown-ups, sausage is sin. Bacon is verboten. A juicy steak is dietary blasphemy. Americans are concerned--not to say obsessed--over what they eat. And the belief has taken root that youngsters should watch their diets, too. It makes sense: Heart disease starts early. The man who dies of a heart attack at 65 is the victim of an illness that probably began in nursery school. Many doctors believe they can forestall this insidious destruction by starting people on healthy diets in childhood.
HEALTH
October 27, 2011 | Melissa Healy
As if Americans needed any reminder that weight loss is hard and maintaining weight loss even harder, a study has found that for at least a year, subjects who shed weight on a low-calorie diet were hungrier than when they started and had higher levels of hormones that tell the body to eat more, conserve energy and store away fuel as fat. The report, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, helps explain why roughly 4 in 5...
HEALTH
October 27, 2011 | Melissa Healy
As if Americans needed any reminder that weight loss is hard and maintaining weight loss even harder, a study has found that for at least a year, subjects who shed weight on a low-calorie diet were hungrier than when they started and had higher levels of hormones that tell the body to eat more, conserve energy and store away fuel as fat. The report, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, helps explain why roughly 4 in 5...
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It may never be too late to extend life through sensible eating. A UC Riverside study shows that a strict, low-calorie diet increased the life span of aged mice by more than 40%. Many studies have shown that starting young mice on a restricted-calorie diet helps them live for months longer than lab animals fed a standard diet. But the new research shows that even 19-month-old mice, about the human equivalent of 60 to 65 years, can have a longer life when eating fewer calories. Stephen R.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Obese men who want to improve their sexual health might have another solution besides their erectile dysfunction drugs. A study finds that overweight men who lost just 5% of their weight over eight weeks saw improvements in erectile dysfunction, sexual desire and urinary tract symptoms. The small study focused on 31 obese men with a body mass index of 30 or greater and who had Type 2 diabetes. Some were put on a low-calorie diet that included liquid meal replacements and others were assigned to a high-protein, low-fat diet that decreased their calorie intake by 600 calories a day. For 42 weeks afterward the participants stayed on the high-protein diet, or were switched to it. Those on the low-calorie diet lost 10% of their body weight and 10% off their waist circumference, and those on the high-protein diet lost 5% of their weight and waist circumference.
FOOD
January 5, 2000 | RUSS PARSONS
Well, we survived the Y2K changeover, whether we deserved to or not. Still, we can't help but think that the end of the world must be near. Here are two of our most recent favorite signs: * Martha Studies In a recent issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education, a magazine that parses the meaning of what's going on in the world of academia, there was an article on the burgeoning interest in scholarly studies of Martha Stewart. Yes, that Martha Stewart. In fact, at a recent American Studies Assn.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Elena Conis
A long-ago discredited fad diet has been getting increased attention lately, thanks to Web chatter and the claims of a bestselling author. The so-called HCG diet's recent popularity is a bit surprising -- and not just because research suggests it doesn't work. Other currently popular diets call for cutting back on fat and sugar, consuming whole grains and lean meats, and even indulging in red wine. The HCG diet, in contrast, calls for eating just 500 calories a day while taking daily injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Obese men who want to improve their sexual health might have another solution besides their erectile dysfunction drugs. A study finds that overweight men who lost just 5% of their weight over eight weeks saw improvements in erectile dysfunction, sexual desire and urinary tract symptoms. The small study focused on 31 obese men with a body mass index of 30 or greater and who had Type 2 diabetes. Some were put on a low-calorie diet that included liquid meal replacements and others were assigned to a high-protein, low-fat diet that decreased their calorie intake by 600 calories a day. For 42 weeks afterward the participants stayed on the high-protein diet, or were switched to it. Those on the low-calorie diet lost 10% of their body weight and 10% off their waist circumference, and those on the high-protein diet lost 5% of their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Kendall Powell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Diet and exercise. Diet and exercise. It's a drumbeat most middle-aged and older patients hear from their doctors every year. But for those with Type 2 diabetes, these basic lifestyle factors can play a key role in controlling the disorder and preventing serious complications such as blindness, nerve disorders and kidney failure. People with Type 2 diabetes aren't able to respond properly to insulin, an essential hormone that helps transfer sugar from the bloodstream to cells, where it is used for energy.
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Bob Kaplan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fifteen years ago, I gained the dreaded "freshman 15" — times two. I packed on 30 pounds in what felt like a blink of an eye. Sophomore year, things were going to change. I adopted a Spartan regime: limiting my calories and fat intake, emulating Greg LeMond on the stationary bike and Arnold Schwarzenegger in the weight room. By my junior year, after a Herculean amount of effort and willpower, I had lost a grand total of 3 pounds. The weight I effortlessly gained seemed impossible to shed.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Elena Conis
A long-ago discredited fad diet has been getting increased attention lately, thanks to Web chatter and the claims of a bestselling author. The so-called HCG diet's recent popularity is a bit surprising -- and not just because research suggests it doesn't work. Other currently popular diets call for cutting back on fat and sugar, consuming whole grains and lean meats, and even indulging in red wine. The HCG diet, in contrast, calls for eating just 500 calories a day while taking daily injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)
HEALTH
October 26, 2009 | Marni Jameson
Simply put, diabetes is a contest between people and their blood. For people whose bodies don't produce enough insulin to manage their blood sugar, the goal is a normal blood score, achieved through a balancing act of lifestyle and medication. "Eventually most patients will follow a course of lifestyle, medications, then insulin," said Dr. Enrico Cagliero, referring to people diagnosed with the most common form of diabetes, known as Type 2. He's an endocrinologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
"The Biggest Loser" winner John Rhode is happy he nabbed the grand prize after shedding 220 pounds, but he's also worried he might gain the weight back, and he's not alone. Most people who lose weight eventually gain some, all or all plus more of it back in endless cycles of yo-yo diets. "He admitted he has a food addiction ," says Felicia Stoler , a New York-based registered dietitian, exercise physiologist and author of "Living Skinny in Fat Genes: The Healthy Way to Lose Weight and Feel Great.
HEALTH
October 26, 2009 | Marni Jameson
Simply put, diabetes is a contest between people and their blood. For people whose bodies don't produce enough insulin to manage their blood sugar, the goal is a normal blood score, achieved through a balancing act of lifestyle and medication. "Eventually most patients will follow a course of lifestyle, medications, then insulin," said Dr. Enrico Cagliero, referring to people diagnosed with the most common form of diabetes, known as Type 2. He's an endocrinologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It may never be too late to extend life through sensible eating. A UC Riverside study shows that a strict, low-calorie diet increased the life span of aged mice by more than 40%. Many studies have shown that starting young mice on a restricted-calorie diet helps them live for months longer than lab animals fed a standard diet. But the new research shows that even 19-month-old mice, about the human equivalent of 60 to 65 years, can have a longer life when eating fewer calories. Stephen R.
HEALTH
September 10, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
Putting elderly mice on a very low-calorie diet for as little as four weeks reversed many of the changes in the activity of various genes that had occurred during normal aging, according to a new study. The research, which used a new technology to pinpoint which genes are active in mice at different ages, may help scientists understand how calorie restriction extends animals' lifespan and, eventually, to develop longevity therapies for humans.
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