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BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when an airline such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launches service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers - United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American Airlines and US Airways.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when airlines such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launch service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers: United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American and US Airways.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Three of the top four airlines in 2003 were low-cost carriers, with JetBlue Airways Corp. leading the pack with the best overall performance, according to an annual study released Monday. The study's authors say the report showed why low-fare airlines are gobbling up market share from traditional carriers: They're on time more, they bump fewer passengers, they mishandle less baggage and they generate fewer complaints.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when an airline such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launches service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers - United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American Airlines and US Airways.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2002 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Sniping at the airlines seems to be a national pastime. But I refrain when it comes to the low-cost carriers, such as JetBlue, Southwest, Spirit, ATA, AirTran, Frontier, National, Midwest Express and America West. They make me want to go places I never considered, just because the price is right. While the airlines duke it out for passengers, I'm pleased to snap up plane tickets to Las Vegas or the Bay Area for the price of a massage. Suddenly, flying seems easier and more interesting.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Airline mergers have put more than 70% of the nation's domestic traffic in the hands of four major carriers. But low-cost airlines still have some influence over airfares. A new study shows that when airlines such as JetBlue, Spirit, Frontier, Alaska and Southwest launch service on an existing domestic route, the average price from all carriers drops as much as 67%. It's good news for travelers, but aviation experts say most popular routes are still dominated by the four biggest carriers: United, Delta, Southwest and the soon-to-be-merged American and US Airways.
TRAVEL
July 27, 2003 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Low-fare airlines and the majors are flying so close together that someone should file a near-miss report. The line between no-frills and full service is quickly blurring. Consider these recent changes: * Starting in the fall, JetBlue passengers will get more legroom. The upstart discounter, which already provides leather upholstery and a TV screen at every seat, will offer 34 inches of "seat pitch" (distance between seat backs) instead of 32.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When it comes time to trade in your frequent-flier reward points for seats on an airplane, low-cost airlines do the best job of getting you in the air. That was the conclusion of a study released last week by IdeaWorks, a Wisconsin consultant to the airline industry. In March, IdeaWorks submitted nearly 7,000 booking requests through the frequent-flier websites of 23 airlines. Seats were requested for the airline's most popular routes in June through October. The study had a 93.5% success rate of finding available seats on low-cost airlines around the world, including U.S. carriers such as Southwest Airlines, AirTran Airways and JetBlue Airways.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Low-cost airlines such as Ryanair Holdings, JetBlue Airways Corp. and AirAsia account for 1 in 8 flights worldwide, double the number from before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a British report released Monday said. Discount airlines operate 12% of the more than 2.27 million scheduled flights worldwide, according to figures from the Bedfordshire, England-based Official Airline Guide. The growth of low-cost carriers contributed to combined losses of $9.2 billion for U.S.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. airline industry has been on a hiring trend lately, but don't expect that to continue too much longer. For the ninth straight month, the airline industry added full-time employees in August, with employment numbers up 2.8% from the same month last year, according to the U.S. Transportation Department's Bureau of Transportation Statistics. In August, commercial passenger airlines employed 388,523 full-time workers in the U.S., up 10,688 workers from August 2010, according to the bureau.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Even before the disappearance of its Boeing 777, Malaysia Airlines faced financial turbulence and stiff competition from low-cost carriers in Asia. Still, airline experts say Malaysia's flagship carrier could survive the economic blow of the disaster by responding with new management and a safety campaign, among other changes. "The airline needs to show it is committed to safety, security and reliability," said Henry H. Harteveldt, a travel industry analyst for advisory firm Hudson Crossing.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been updated, as indicated below
The freezing temperatures and storms described by the National Weather Service as "an event of historic proportions" forced the cancellation of nearly 3,500 flights Wednesday, with thousands more expected Thursday. An additional 4,700 or so flights were delayed, mostly in the southern section of the country, where an ice storm is moving from central Mississippi up to the Eastern Seaboard. The ripples of the canceled flights have forced the cancellation of several dozen flights in and out of Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego, according to the flight monitoring site, Flightaware.com.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
In most luxury hotels, if you want wireless Internet access, you are going to have to pay. That trend may be changing. Sort of. Loews Hotels & Resorts announced last month that it will offer free Wi-Fi at all 18 of its hotels, including the ones in Hollywood, Santa Monica and San Diego. If you want faster Internet to connect up to eight devices, however, that will cost $19.95 per day. In the past, many luxury hotels offered only one choice: Wi-Fi at a hefty price. Previously, Loews charged about $15 to $20 per day for the slower Internet that it now offers free of charge.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
A drunken man gets tackled by a group of off-duty cops in November while trying to storm the cockpit on a flight from Warsaw to Toronto. An inebriated passenger on a January flight from Iceland to New York tries to grope and choke fellow travelers until crew and passengers bind him with duct tape. Such incidents are no longer flukes but rather a trend that has prompted airlines to call for new laws to deal with unruly passengers and other mayhem on international flights. The number of incidents of unruly passengers has jumped from fewer than 500 in 2007 to more than 6,000 in 2011, according to the International Air Transport Assn., the trade group for world airlines, which has been keeping track of the incidents.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Conventional wisdom says that when competition increases, prices go down. In the airline industry, something unexpected also happens when a low-cost carrier enters a market to challenge big network airlines. According to a new study from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business, increased competition from low-cost airlines seems to lower the on-time performance of the big airlines. “As much as more competition means lower prices, it is not as clear that the same is true with quality,” said Jeff Prince, co-author of the report and associate professor of business economics at the school.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The Justice Department announced Tuesday that it has reached a settlement agreement to allow the merger of American Airlines and US Airways to form the nation's largest air carrier. The department, which sued in August to stop the merger, said that as part of the deal, it will require the airlines to give up landing slots and passenger gates at airports where the combined carrier would dominate its competition. The two airlines said they will abide by the Justice Department's demands to allow the merger.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Conventional wisdom says that when competition increases, prices go down. In the airline industry, something unexpected also happens when a low-cost carrier enters a market to challenge big network airlines. According to a new study from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business, increased competition from low-cost airlines seems to lower the on-time performance of the big airlines. “As much as more competition means lower prices, it is not as clear that the same is true with quality,” said Jeff Prince, co-author of the report and associate professor of business economics at the school.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Low-cost airlines that cut out many of the extras might not be expected to get high marks for service - just as fast food is not as likely to win culinary awards. But J.D. Power and Associates' “2012 Customer Service Champions” did not include such long-established carriers like Delta, United or American airlines among the 50 companies from various industries that won the distinction this year based on value, service and other measures.  Instead, the report listed low-cost airlines Southwest, JetBlue and San Francisco-based upstart Virgin America as the only carriers to win the award.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
American Airlines and US Airways moved another step closer to creating the world's biggest carrier but had to make concessions to help ensure the deal wouldn't lead to service cuts and higher fares. The Justice Department said Tuesday the agency would back the $11-billion combination under an agreement that the airlines give up dozens of gates at major hubs including New York, Washington and Los Angeles. Both sides heralded the agreement as a boon to consumers because those gates must be auctioned off to low-cost competitors.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Passenger fees and other extra charges generated $27.1 billion for airlines around the world in 2012, with major carriers like United, Delta and American airlines leading the revenue race. In 2012, 53 airlines around the globe collected $27.1 billion in so-called ancillary revenue, compared with $22.6 billion collected by 50 carriers in 2011, according to a new report by IdeaWorks Co., a Wisconsin consultant on airline fees. The study was sponsored by CarTrawler, a Dublin, Ireland-based provider of car rental distribution systems.
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