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OPINION
April 13, 2002
I agree with The Times' support of legislation for greater water conservation measures ("Flushing Away a Resource," editorial, April 8). Assemblywoman Fran Pavley's bill, AB 2734, will help conserve hundreds of thousands of gallons in water-deficient Southern California by expanding the very successful low-flow toilet retrofit program. In West Hollywood, we are testing a new waterless-urinal technology that can save up to 40,000 gallons of water per urinal annually. These urinals are no more expensive than standard urinals, and they cost less to maintain since there are no moving parts or complicated plumbing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2009 | By Bettina Boxall
Katie Martin grew up with a set of water commandments. No lingering in the shower. Turn off the faucet when you brush your teeth. Don't flood the yard. Until she left for college this fall, the 19-year-old lived with her family in a typical California stucco house with a lawn. But when it comes to water, neither the Martins nor their town, San Luis Obispo, is typical. Katie, her parents and little brother use roughly half the water on a per-person basis as the average single-family household in Los Angeles used last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1991
As the water picture worsens, we have been asked many times to take steps to cut back our water usage. Much of the focus is on the individual consumer. At the same time, major wasters of water are doing business as usual, with apparently no pressure on them to conserve water. In frequent travels to Los Angeles and the Bay area, I've observed many hotels without low-flow shower heads. Consider 50-200 rooms per hotel all pouring out water at full bore, multiply this by the many delinquent hotels and you're looking at an enormous potential savings.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
Cash remittances from Mexicans living abroad keep tumbling, with a second-quarter drop of 17.9% compared with the same period last year, officials said Tuesday. Mexico's central bank said remittances for April through June fell to $5.6 billion, continuing a downward trend that has lasted more than a year. The money transfers are off 12% during the first six months of 2009, compared with the first half of 2008. The latest report was no surprise, but it spelled more gloomy news for Mexico's limping economy, which has been hammered by declining oil earnings, a sharp drop in exports and a flu crisis during the spring that put a big dent in tourism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990
As water rationing seems to be upon us and we are implored to look for ways to conserve water, may I suggest to the water authorities they first look to the hotels? As a business traveler, I stay often in hotels and go up and down the state (though not in San Diego). Many of them lack low-flow shower heads. Multiply each of these hotels by 300-400 showers a day per hotel and you're looking at a lot of water down the drain. THOMAS LEECH San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
Thank you, Patt Morrison, for taking Rep. Joe Knollenberg (R-Mich.) to task for his attempts to repeal the federal requirement that all new household toilets be low-flow (Aug. 13). Doesn't he know that the Earth's water supply is finite? My husband and I just returned from a trip to Australia, where we found most toilets in hotels and public restrooms were equipped with two flush buttons. The one with the half moon on it was for No. 1 and the one with the full moon was for No. 2. Voila!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990
As we become resigned to another drier-than-normal year, we are hearing lots of talk about water conservation. We hear about bricks in toilet tanks and low-flow showers and running dishwashers with a full load. What I have never heard on this water-conservation list is a mention of water softeners and a discussion of the prodigious amounts of water they waste. For the Zeolite in the softener to function, it must be back-flushed every day with tap water that first flows through a salt-tank and then through the Zeolite.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
Residential property owners will be required to install low-flow toilets, shower heads and faucets before selling their homes or apartment buildings if a plan proposed by the council is enacted. The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to draft an ordinance that includes older properties in the municipal code, which now requires new and remodeled buildings to have low-flow plumbing fixtures.
NEWS
January 10, 1993
San Gabriel Valley-area water districts have instituted two programs to offer rebates for customers who replace existing toilets with low-flow ones. The Walnut Valley Water District, serving customers in the eastern valley, will give as much as $160 to businesses or households that exchange water-wasting toilets for water-conserving models. Details are available from Denis Hernandez at (909) 595-1268.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1990 | JANET BERGAMO
The Fillmore City Council introduced an ordinance Tuesday requiring developers and residents to install water-saving devices when they remodel or build new homes and offices. Low-flow plumbing fixtures will be required statewide by January, 1992. Devices include water-saving shower heads and toilets that use 1.6 gallons per flush instead of the 3.5 gallons now permitted by Fillmore's Uniform Plumbing Code. The council is expected to pass the ordinance by the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
More than a year after 34,000 fish succumbed in the Klamath River, a long-delayed report released Tuesday by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded that low river flows, high water temperatures and crowded conditions helped produce one of the worst salmon die-offs on the West Coast.
OPINION
April 13, 2002
I agree with The Times' support of legislation for greater water conservation measures ("Flushing Away a Resource," editorial, April 8). Assemblywoman Fran Pavley's bill, AB 2734, will help conserve hundreds of thousands of gallons in water-deficient Southern California by expanding the very successful low-flow toilet retrofit program. In West Hollywood, we are testing a new waterless-urinal technology that can save up to 40,000 gallons of water per urinal annually. These urinals are no more expensive than standard urinals, and they cost less to maintain since there are no moving parts or complicated plumbing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
Thank you, Patt Morrison, for taking Rep. Joe Knollenberg (R-Mich.) to task for his attempts to repeal the federal requirement that all new household toilets be low-flow (Aug. 13). Doesn't he know that the Earth's water supply is finite? My husband and I just returned from a trip to Australia, where we found most toilets in hotels and public restrooms were equipped with two flush buttons. The one with the half moon on it was for No. 1 and the one with the full moon was for No. 2. Voila!
BUSINESS
July 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
Some members of Congress want to flush away a federal law that requires new toilets to use less water. The new low-flow commodes are intended to save water, but some lawmakers complained Tuesday that you have to flush again--and maybe again--to rinse all waste out of the bowl. A 1992 conservation law requires less water for any new toilets installed in homes, along with lighter sprays in shower heads. New toilets are limited to 1.6 gallons of water a flush; the older toilets allowed 3.5 gallons.
REAL ESTATE
March 14, 1999 | SUE McALLISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget bragging about your home's city lights view or tumbled-marble floors. This year, thanks to a new Los Angeles city ordinance, the humble low-flow toilet may be the feature you're most proud to own. Under a city ordinance approved last year and enforced beginning in January, Los Angeles residents who are selling their homes must replace any old-fashioned high-volume-flow commodes in their homes with water-efficient "ultra-low-flow" models before escrow closes.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few dream of doing great things with sewage. But fortunately for this college town, two men who saw the potential in human waste teach here at Humboldt State. Together, Robert Gearheart and George Allen turned a local garbage dump into a low-tech treatment plant, wildlife refuge and salmon-spawning spot. In the process, they won some respect for a town on California's rugged north coast that was used to being derided by its neighbors for its tree-hugging, environment-loving policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | HOLLY EDWARDS
The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District has created a new rebate incentive program to encourage its customers to replace their high water volume toilets with environmentally friendly water-conserving models. When all toilets at one property are replaced simultaneously, the new program offers water customers a rebate of $100 per toilet. But if individual toilets are replaced, the district will offer the previously set rebate of $60 per toilet.
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