Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLow Income Housing Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Low Income Housing Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993
A 110-unit apartment complex for poor, one-parent families opened Monday in the Westlake area of Los Angeles. The $18-million project, with an on-site child-care center and 24-hour security is designed for single heads of households, the majority of them women, said a representative for New Economics for Women, the building's nonprofit developer. Tenants, who are to move in next month, will pay from $80 to $450 a month for studios to four-bedroom apartments.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swamped by 82,000 requests for help, Los Angeles officials announced on Friday that 20,000 low-income people, whose names were selected in a lottery, will be allowed to apply for funds under a federal rent-assistance program. The other 62,000 who registered for the federal Section 8 program last December and January will be allowed to file applications in the future, officials said. Those at the bottom of the list will have to wait 3 1/2 years for applications, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resounding rebuff by the mayor and City Council last week of a proposal to make garage apartments safer, and in some cases legal, comes at a time when Los Angeles is on the brink of a major shift in housing policy.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a closely watched case, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Wednesday that the city of Sacramento can charge commercial builders additional fees to help pay for low-income housing when their developments bring an influx of new workers. The decision provides a green light to a number of other cash-strapped California cities, including Los Angeles, that want to institute similar fees.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Evicting residents by the tens of thousands, the Jan. 17 earthquake created a corps of newly homeless exceeding the populations of some mid-size cities. Seven weeks later, the encampments that dotted the landscape have vanished and the last of the shelters have closed. Their lives have been uprooted and their nerves frayed, but these quake victims--mostly poor renters but some middle-class and wealthy homeowners as well--are slowly, quietly finding new places to live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resounding rebuff by the mayor and City Council last week of a proposal to make bootleg garage apartments safer and in some cases, legal, comes at a time when Los Angeles is on the brink of a major shift in housing policy. The change is expected to be hastened by the departure of housing chief Gary Squier, an appointee of Mayor Tom Bradley, whose activist style riled a number of Mayor Richard Riordan's aides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
For almost two decades, officials of the Los Angeles Community College District have tried in vain to find money to build a badly needed parking structure for Los Angeles Trade Technical College, south of downtown. Tonight, district trustees will be asked to launch a novel partnership with the city and other agencies that--if financing can be obtained--would bring not only parking but small businesses and about 100 apartments to a district-owned site across from the college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cassandra and Orlando Warren were renters in Hollywood when they decided that the first house of their dreams would be a $150,000 two-story stucco in a new development in Watts. She is an administrative secretary, he is a sometime computer installer. Between them, they barely make $35,000 a year. To get the down payment, they worked overtime and extra time, and when they came up short, Cassandra pawned her diamond-studded wedding band.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite strong neighborhood opposition, a Los Angeles City Council panel recommended a $2.4-million loan Monday to provide low-income senior citizen housing on a Ventura Boulevard commercial lot that has been vacant and blighted for nearly six years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1993 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles is among 50 cities nationwide expected to benefit from a private organization's plans to help 10,000 low- and moderate-income residents buy houses over the next five years. The program, announced Tuesday by the nonprofit Neighborhood Reinvestment Corp., calls for spending $625 million to locate, renovate and finance homes by working with a national network of community organizations and private financial institutions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|