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Low Income Housing New York

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991
Federal officials have awarded more than $1.4 million to a California bank to build or refurbish low-income housing, including two hotels on Los Angeles' Skid Row, bank representatives said Monday. Some of the subsidy from the Federal Home Loan Bank will go toward rehabilitation and seismic retrofitting of the Carton and Haskell hotels near downtown, which together have 83 single-occupancy rooms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991
Federal officials have awarded more than $1.4 million to a California bank to build or refurbish low-income housing, including two hotels on Los Angeles' Skid Row, bank representatives said Monday. Some of the subsidy from the Federal Home Loan Bank will go toward rehabilitation and seismic retrofitting of the Carton and Haskell hotels near downtown, which together have 83 single-occupancy rooms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1985 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Eighteen opponents of U.S. military involvement in Central America staged a three-hour prayer vigil Friday in front of the downtown Federal Building in Los Angeles after their plans to be arrested for trespassing on federal property went awry. In New York City, meanwhile, more than 60 people were arrested during a protest against a military museum.
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times architectural critic
Ada Louise Huxtable loathes the uninspired. During the '60s and '70s, the petite, sharp-eyed critic terrorized corrupt developers and greedy architects as the New York Times' first architecture critic. But her relentless fight against the shoddy and the second-rate was coupled with a giddy faith that around the corner lurked something truly heroic. Huxtable was--and remains--an optimist. The battle is not over.
NEWS
December 11, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Before dawn 14 years ago, Edward Logue stood nervously in the bitter cold on a street corner in the South Bronx, awaiting a small caravan of trucks. The trucks were carrying the pieces of two modular homes across the George Washington Bridge from a factory in Pennsylvania to Charlotte Street, where Logue had decided to erect a handful of suburban-style private houses, complete with white picket fences.
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