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Low Income Housing Orange County

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NEWS
May 28, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to crack down on overcrowded dwellings, the Orange City Council has given initial approval to an ordinance that critics say could reduce the supply of low-income housing in Orange County. City officials said the new occupancy law, which sets limits on the number of occupants per residence, is necessary to control overcrowding and the social ills it may cause.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolina Lopez had heard the neighborhood buzz for several months: Everyone on South Minnie Street was going to get a new apartment. But she dismissed it as the wishful thinking of immigrants like her. Last week, Lopez learned that rumors sometimes are true. Her apartment--a one-bedroom unit she shares with her son, husband and another couple in a dilapidated building on South Minnie Street in Santa Ana--and 126 others will be renovated, thanks to an $8.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
Tucked against a hillside on Laguna Canyon Road is the oldest, smallest and, some say, luckiest mobile home park in Laguna Beach. Not much grumbling goes on at Thurston Trailer Park about the lack of a clubhouse, swimming pool or ocean view--niceties available at the city's two other mobile home parks. Instead, Thurston residents, most of whom have incomes low enough to qualify for financial aid, feel pretty fortunate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A debate dividing Laguna Beach for months spilled into a packed City Hall meeting room and was coming to a head when Bob Henry, wearing a Santa Claus hat and jingling sleigh bells, took center stage. In a hilarious rendition of "A Visit From St. Nicholas," the onetime producer for Flip Wilson lampooned the fight by some feisty fellow seniors for a plot of land set aside for a possible low-income housing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1997 | LIZ SEYMOUR
The site of an empty, dilapidated building near downtown will be converted into about 20 apartments for low-income residents. The City Council briefly considered limiting occupancy to senior citizens on fixed incomes. But council members, who approved the idea Tuesday, expanded the housing plan to include younger residents and others who work in the city but cannot afford to live there. At least 20% of the units at 450 Glenneyre St. will be reserved for seniors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA
Under a deal approved last week by the City Council, a company that owns a 72-unit apartment complex will be allowed to refinance its original construction bonds in exchange for providing more units for lower-income residents. By unanimous vote, the council agreed to let Western National Properties, which owns the Trabuco Woods apartments at 27159 Rimhurst Drive, extend the bonds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sharon Thadeus was in a bind that many low-paid workers face. Forced to leave her Garden Grove apartment when her rent doubled, the part-time telemarketer couldn't find affordable housing in a safe neighborhood--until she came across Costa Mesa Village, Orange County's first single-room-occupancy hotel. "This place is just great," Thadeus said. "It's clean and really, really safe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Declaring that the city's strict residential occupancy limits discriminate against minorities and low-income residents, the state Department of Housing and Community Development on Tuesday joined a legal fight against the restrictions. State officials filed written arguments in a lawsuit before the 4th District Court of Appeal, which is considering the case brought by Santa Ana resident Ascencion Briseno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
The Laguna Beach City Council has approved spending $555,000 to help develop the county's first low-income housing project where people infected with the AIDS virus can live independently. Project backers say the apartment complex they plan to open in Laguna Beach in late 1995 will provide much-needed housing in Orange County, where studies show eight to 10 people will be waiting for each of the 24 available units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting in the living room of his family's new condominium, Candido Reyes exudes the unbounded optimism of an immigrant who in less than a decade has gone from grinding poverty in his native Mexico to a slice of the American pie. Reyes and his wife, Griselda, literally awoke in the middle of the American dream last week, when the couple and their two young children scrambled down the stairs of their new home.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2000 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Hosey sat in a drab motel room in Anaheim's tourist district. She wore a light-gray Mickey Mouse T-shirt. Her black Mickey Mouse sunglasses were perched on top of her head. But Hosey wasn't here to visit Disneyland. This one-room unit at the Covered Wagon has been her home since April. Hosey, who earns little more than minimum wage answering phones at a nearby moving company, can't afford an apartment in the area. She has no savings, nor much of a credit history.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2000 | DIANE WEDNER and JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Low-income residents of Orange County, San Diego and dozens of other U.S. communities will receive higher federal housing subsidies to help keep pace with skyrocketing housing costs, the federal government's housing agency said Tuesday. Officials at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said they hope the measure will make an additional 1.4 million apartments available to low-income families in areas where fast-rising prices are shutting them out of the rental market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Homeowners in a downtown Santa Ana low-income condominium complex have sued the project's developers, alleging that shoddy construction has led to water damage and health problems for several residents. Residents of the Spectrum Condominiums have complained for years about collapsing roofs, faulty plumbing, flooding and electrical hazards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Using $58 million in bonds, Anaheim will double the amount of housing targeted at low-income residents by the city. The City Council today is expected to approve issuing the bonds, which represent about 15% of those approved by the state in a recent round of funding for low-rent housing projects. "It's a very large bond issue," Anaheim housing manager Brent Schultz said. "It just all came together now."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER and JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a well-documented shortage of housing countywide, regional planning authorities forecast that Orange County will need 75,000 new housing units in the next five years, a third of which they say should be priced for low-income and very-low-income residents. Individual cities are in the final stages of evaluating their own housing needs to meet a state-imposed planning deadline that will shape their building plans for five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
The City Council will consider tonight whether to begin initial stages of leasing the land at 450 Glenneyre to a developer to build 20 low-income rental units. The Irvine-based developer, the Related Cos. of California, was recommended by a city panel to submit conceptual plans. The city has about 115 low-income housing units, but all are reserved for seniors or disabled people. The 40-year-old commercial building on the 21,000-square-foot site will be demolished, pending city approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992 | ROSE APODACA
Residents living near the site of proposed low-income apartments have told the City Council that they are upset that the complex would not be developed for senior citizen housing. In a joint venture with the nonprofit La Habra Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS), the city plans to build a 12-unit apartment complex on the half-acre lot in the 600 block of East La Habra Boulevard. But a group of senior citizens last Tuesday night rallied for senior housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1999 | Crystal Carreon, (714) 966-1036
The Redevelopment Agency voted Tuesday to expand the boundaries of the Second Mortgage Assistance Program to include West Anaheim. The nine-year program, which helps low-income residents buy homes, is already active in the area bounded by La Palma Avenue, East Street and Ball Road. Earlier this month the Anaheim Redevelopment and Housing Commission unanimously approved expanding the program boundaries to increase the number of eligible participants. Information: (714) 765-4340.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2000 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
A proposed low-income housing project will be reviewed by the Planning Commission at 7 p.m. tonight at City Hall. The three-story, 107-unit apartment complex in the 8100 block of Ellis Avenue is meant to alleviate the housing crunch among low-income residents, but some residents say the project will attract criminals into the neighborhood. The commission hearing is in council chambers, 2000 Main St. Information: (714) 536-5271.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 520-2508
City officials approved $6 million in bonds for a project to provide homes for low-income families. Council members Monday unanimously approved multiple-family housing revenue bonds so a private development company could buy and renovate a 72-unit apartment complex on Cypress Street and designate it for low-income housing.
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