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Low Self Esteem

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MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
Regarding "How Fathers Figure," by Paul Ciotti: If one were stupid enough to rely on the documented findings of the male psychologists and physicians Ciotti refers to, one would conclude that boys raised by their mothers are unfriendly, immature, disobedient, cowardly, intellectually deficient and suffer low self-esteem. Because Ciotti can't come up with anything deep about fatherhood, he resorts to mother-bashing. Shame on you. BLAKE LATIMER Venice
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SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Don't press the like button: Facebook is a bummer that makes us feel worse about our lives, according to new research. Facebook users in a study led by the University of Michigan wound up feeling worse about themselves after two weeks, and their moment-to-moment mood darkened the more they browsed the social medium. It didn't seem to matter how big their network was, how supportive they thought their friends were, nor why they went to Facebook in the first place, according to the study published online Wednesday in PLOS One . "We were able to show on a moment-to-moment basis throughout the day how people's mood fluctuated depending on their Facebook usage,” said University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the study.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1988
It is not surprising that the producers of Equity Waiver theaters think so little of the actors who volunteer their time. What I find disturbing is that nearly half of Equity's members have such low self-esteem. If we allow these "work-for-no-pay" producers to bust our union, we will open wide the door to the legitimate producers, who will soon have us working for minimum wage. THOM McCLEISTER Venice Please keep letters brief and include full name, address and phone number.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Facebook, the social networking giant that connects 845 million people to one another, may be a jolly gabfest for the self-assured. But for those who suffer from low self-esteem, it appears to be a rather nasty trap, luring such people into self-disclosures that prompt many a Facebook friend to agree with their low opinion of themselves. A new study, set to be published in the journal Psychological Science, explored the dynamics of friendship on Facebook to see what benefits or pitfalls the site might offer to a population that could use the propping up of a few new friends: those who think poorly of themselves, fear judgment by others and are prone to social isolation and depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999
I do not think most of us in the psychoanalytic community would agree with Dr. Arnold I. Gilberg's opinion (letter, Feb. 22) that it is the labeling of difficulties in a person's sexual function that causes low self-esteem. Rather, it is the feelings of inadequacy and shame about the sexual difficulty which lead the person to conceal the problem, often with a sense of embarrassment and hopelessness. The recent response to the news about Viagra is evidence that there are many individuals hoping for such help but who have been reluctant to reveal their problem.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Facebook, the social networking giant that connects 845 million people to one another, may be a jolly gabfest for the self-assured. But for those who suffer from low self-esteem, it appears to be a rather nasty trap, luring such people into self-disclosures that prompt many a Facebook friend to agree with their low opinion of themselves. A new study, set to be published in the journal Psychological Science, explored the dynamics of friendship on Facebook to see what benefits or pitfalls the site might offer to a population that could use the propping up of a few new friends: those who think poorly of themselves, fear judgment by others and are prone to social isolation and depression.
MAGAZINE
September 16, 1990
I used to think I was so bad, so cool, so hip, when I was addicted. Now those are the last things on my mind. I'm a mother, a wife, a student, a friend, a volunteer and a good neighbor. I'm just growing up now, even though I'm 37; I lost 15 years. My experience of six months at Impact in 1972 was one of the worst, if not the worst, long-term experiences of my life. I, like many others after me, went there to stave off jail terms. But the program, being in its early stages, was fraught with in-house staff fighting and turmoil.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1989
We propose an effective and efficient tack that would eradicate the market for drugs. We suggest a systematic engendering and enhancement of individual self-esteem and responsibility among our youth. Ideally, this would be done at home, from the crib. Realistically, it's not, so the schools must incorporate self-esteem and personal responsibility skills, starting in kindergarten. It is an irrefutable fact that individuals with a strong, positive sense of self aren't as likely to succumb to pushers' tactics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2010
Dear Amy: My daughter-in-law is constantly telling me that I raised my son wrong. They have been together for 20 years and have two teenage children. My son has been the sole provider during this time. She believes that it is her place to stay home with the children. I get to hear how my son does not do enough for her. She says I raised a thoughtless brat. There are variations on this theme, but it is something I hear over and over. I smile and tell her I did the best I could.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
Re Samantha Bonar's "Comfortable? Then It's Probably Not a Date" (May 6): Having been on the smitten side of one too many of these types of relationships, I have finally gotten wise. It has forced me to be more direct, which is perhaps a good thing. This is what I have noticed, however: Many women want to have their cake and eat it too. They don't go diving for their wallets when the bill comes; they dress up (to impress other men in the vicinity); and, when they sense my attention is starting to wane, they flirt a little to get it back.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2010
Dear Amy: My daughter-in-law is constantly telling me that I raised my son wrong. They have been together for 20 years and have two teenage children. My son has been the sole provider during this time. She believes that it is her place to stay home with the children. I get to hear how my son does not do enough for her. She says I raised a thoughtless brat. There are variations on this theme, but it is something I hear over and over. I smile and tell her I did the best I could.
SPORTS
June 23, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
Eleven years and 39 Grand Slam endeavors ago, a 16-year-old turned up at the Australian Open with a ranking of No. 53, beat No. 9 Irina Spirlea in the first round and said, among other things, "I have never feared anyone." Eleven years and 39 Grand Slam endeavors later, a 27-year-old turned up at Wimbledon with a ranking of No. 2, improved to 39-0 in Grand Slam first rounds, and then Serena Williams discussed, of all things, vulnerabilities.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | Curtis L. Taylor, Newsday Staff Writer
Women aren't the only ones who shop until they drop. Men can be just as compulsive when it comes to binge buying, according to research from the Stanford University School of Medicine. But men tend to prefer such things as electronic equipment, tools, books and CDs, compared with the jewelry, perfume and designer apparel that women often favor. Lead author Dr. Lorrin M.
HEALTH
July 3, 2006 | Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Special to The Times
As the playwright, poet and marriage counselor all know, the emotional boundary between love and hate can be surprisingly porous. For many, partners can inspire intense tenderness and devotion one week and glassy-eyed loathing the next. For others, the feelings for a loved one are much more constant and less apt to flip between extremes. Such flips between loving and loathing can make for a wilder life -- witness the sizzling combat and sex scenes between Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie in "Mr.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
Re Samantha Bonar's "Comfortable? Then It's Probably Not a Date" (May 6): Having been on the smitten side of one too many of these types of relationships, I have finally gotten wise. It has forced me to be more direct, which is perhaps a good thing. This is what I have noticed, however: Many women want to have their cake and eat it too. They don't go diving for their wallets when the bill comes; they dress up (to impress other men in the vicinity); and, when they sense my attention is starting to wane, they flirt a little to get it back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999
I do not think most of us in the psychoanalytic community would agree with Dr. Arnold I. Gilberg's opinion (letter, Feb. 22) that it is the labeling of difficulties in a person's sexual function that causes low self-esteem. Rather, it is the feelings of inadequacy and shame about the sexual difficulty which lead the person to conceal the problem, often with a sense of embarrassment and hopelessness. The recent response to the news about Viagra is evidence that there are many individuals hoping for such help but who have been reluctant to reveal their problem.
OPINION
March 29, 1987
As a member of the California Task Force on Self-Esteem and Personal and Social Responsibility, I have been following with some amusement the series of Doonesbury cartoons by Garry Trudeau. While I am perfectly able and willing to be the subject of good-natured humor, I worry that this one-sided point of view obscures the intent of the legislation. This is not just another crazy California idea. It is, in fact, a very serious attempt to understand personal and social responsibility as it is shaped by factors of self-esteem.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Don't press the like button: Facebook is a bummer that makes us feel worse about our lives, according to new research. Facebook users in a study led by the University of Michigan wound up feeling worse about themselves after two weeks, and their moment-to-moment mood darkened the more they browsed the social medium. It didn't seem to matter how big their network was, how supportive they thought their friends were, nor why they went to Facebook in the first place, according to the study published online Wednesday in PLOS One . "We were able to show on a moment-to-moment basis throughout the day how people's mood fluctuated depending on their Facebook usage,” said University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the study.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998
Young gay males are more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors if they have low self-esteem or live in areas with a high amount of homophobia, according to new research from behavioral scientist Craig Waldo of UC San Francisco. Waldo and his colleagues studied 302 young gay men living in Eugene, Ore., Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz, all communities with few gay community resources. The team used questionnaires to assess the subjects' self-image and sexual behaviors.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN
Ken, 17, believed he had no choice but to belch loudly during a "mushy" classroom discussion on betrayed love, as depicted in Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter." "I had to do something 'cause I was starting to freak," said Ken, remembering the "dumb day" last year in an English class at a Westside high school. "All that talk about love and feelings and commitment makes me feel weird, like I'm talking about something private. . . . That's why I feel like I had to interrupt."
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