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BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | Bill Sing, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' prosperity depends on how well it integrates its low-skilled immigrant workforce into its knowledge-based industries, according to a report to be released today. The city also must do more to attract and sustain small and medium-sized businesses, in part through improved access to affordable capital. Those are among the key findings of a yearlong, city-funded study on the Los Angeles economy by Santa Monica-based Milken Institute. Former Mayor James K.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 2013 | By Tom Petruno
Never let a crisis go to waste, says an old rule of politics. For some major players in the economy, the financial crisis that began five years ago this month with Lehman Bros.' collapse turned out to be as much an opportunity as a calamity. Although the memories that the anniversary evoke are overwhelmingly grim - cascading home foreclosures, bank failures, massive layoffs, diving stock prices - five years later some spectacular winners have emerged from the maelstrom, along with a more familiar list of pitiable losers.
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OPINION
October 11, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
If Meg Whitman loses the gubernatorial race because her actions didn't jive with her words on illegal immigration, she could become a sacrificial lamb for the rest of us. Her sin is our sin. Because where illegal immigration is concerned, we are all hypocrites. At the second gubernatorial debate held in Fresno two weekends ago, Democratic nominee Jerry Brown had a field day with Whitman's less than elegant response to the revelation that she had employed a maid, Nicandra Diaz Santillan, who was an illegal immigrant.
OPINION
March 10, 2013 | Kevin A. Hasset and Michael R. Strain, Kevin A. Hassett is director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, where Michael R. Strain is a research fellow
In announcing his wrongheaded proposal to increase the minimum wage to $9 an hour, President Obama spoke in lofty terms: "In the wealthiest nation on Earth," he said in his State of the Union address last month, "no one who works full time should have to live in poverty. " If the debate proceeds as it has -- many times -- in the past, then most Democrats will embrace the president's message and back the proposal, while most Republicans will oppose it, on the grounds that higher labor costs will lead to higher unemployment.
SPORTS
November 22, 1997
Didn't Ed Sather (Nov. 15) contradict himself when he said Shaquille O'Neal is a low-skill player with minimal talent but the Lakers would finish near the bottom of the division without him? I am 100% sure that the Lakers would accept any other low-skilled players who can average 28 points, block four or five shots, take down 10 to 15 rebounds, and alter 10 to 15 shots a game. WALTER HARRIS Woodland Hills I just read reader Ed Sather's comments. He calls Shaq a "low-skill player" of "minimal talent."
OPINION
August 25, 2004
Re "Black/Migrant Rivalry for Jobs Can Be Eased," Opinion, Aug. 22: David Bacon overlooks two inconvenient facts. The first is that mass immigration depresses the wages of low-skilled American workers, especially blacks and Latinos. Recent studies by the UCLA Chicano Studies Department (2003) and Harvard labor economist George Borjas (2004) support this conclusion. Second, amnesties only encourage more illegal immigration and a bigger supply of low-skilled workers. When the newly amnestied workers demand better pay, they are fired and replaced by the newcomers, who are hungrier for the work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995
Elton Gallegly's Column Right on "immigration reform" (Oct. 2) focuses on L.A. County's burden in delivering the babies of illegal aliens for free and is offering a bill in Congress to federally reimburse the county, providing the mother's illegal status is determined and written down. This is equity in bookkeeping and helps the county taxpayer (a little). But nowhere does Gallegly mention the need to reform legal immigration. Legal immigrants are far more numerous than illegal immigrants, and they stand to be arriving in the same inflated numbers, or greater, into the next century.
OPINION
February 9, 2002
We shouldn't be surprised at the abysmal education figures ("L.A. Workers Held Back by Low Education Rate," Feb. 5) because the government's immigration policies have created an underclass by design. "Family reunification" immigration sounds admirable; however, the real meaning is that no standards of employability are applied to legal immigrants using that provision, even basic literacy. About one-third of current legal immigrants have not graduated from high school--300,000 per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1999
Re "L.A.'s Growing Pay Gap Looms as Political Issue," Sept. 7: The remarks of L.A. County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky ("You have the potential for serious social upheaval") seem to show a fear that this Dickensian tale will end like "A Tale of Two Cities." Ironically, we Americans have a constitutional right to freedom of speech, religion and assembly, but no constitutional right to food, shelter or medical care. The working poor have to rely on the vagaries of the political climate in Washington, the personal discomfort of local officials and the good works of organizations like United Way. We need to take an honest look at the economic system we live under, which seems to enrich a few and impoverish many.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2009 | Don Lee and Alana Semuels
More than three decades of rapid growth in the country's foreign-born population came to a halt last year, census data show, as surging unemployment made the U.S. economy less attractive to outsiders. In California, which has a long history of attracting immigrants, the number of foreign-born residents actually declined, shrinking 1.6%. "This is clearly a consequence of the economy, with the biggest impact on Mexican and low-skilled immigrants," said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution who analyzed the census figures, which are to be officially released today.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers looking for summer work will have a better chance of finding it this year, according to outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The improving job market, the firm said, has eased competition for the low-skilled, low-paying jobs that traditionally go to teens on school break. The employment environment for high-schoolers and other young folks has made a dramatic recovery since falling to record lows in 2010, when the number of 16- to 19-year-olds working during the summer months was at its slimmest level since 1949.
OPINION
October 11, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
If Meg Whitman loses the gubernatorial race because her actions didn't jive with her words on illegal immigration, she could become a sacrificial lamb for the rest of us. Her sin is our sin. Because where illegal immigration is concerned, we are all hypocrites. At the second gubernatorial debate held in Fresno two weekends ago, Democratic nominee Jerry Brown had a field day with Whitman's less than elegant response to the revelation that she had employed a maid, Nicandra Diaz Santillan, who was an illegal immigrant.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
The illegal immigrants come seeking higher wages, steady employment and a chance at better lives for their families. They cross the border in remote stretches where there are no fences or they pay traffickers to sneak them past border guards. Then they work as maids, harvest crops or toil hunched in sweatshops. As familiar as this sounds, this is not the United States or Europe, but China, which is attracting an increasing number of undocumented workers to fill the bottom rungs of its booming economy.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2009 | Don Lee and Alana Semuels
More than three decades of rapid growth in the country's foreign-born population came to a halt last year, census data show, as surging unemployment made the U.S. economy less attractive to outsiders. In California, which has a long history of attracting immigrants, the number of foreign-born residents actually declined, shrinking 1.6%. "This is clearly a consequence of the economy, with the biggest impact on Mexican and low-skilled immigrants," said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution who analyzed the census figures, which are to be officially released today.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | Bill Sing, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' prosperity depends on how well it integrates its low-skilled immigrant workforce into its knowledge-based industries, according to a report to be released today. The city also must do more to attract and sustain small and medium-sized businesses, in part through improved access to affordable capital. Those are among the key findings of a yearlong, city-funded study on the Los Angeles economy by Santa Monica-based Milken Institute. Former Mayor James K.
OPINION
August 25, 2004
Re "Black/Migrant Rivalry for Jobs Can Be Eased," Opinion, Aug. 22: David Bacon overlooks two inconvenient facts. The first is that mass immigration depresses the wages of low-skilled American workers, especially blacks and Latinos. Recent studies by the UCLA Chicano Studies Department (2003) and Harvard labor economist George Borjas (2004) support this conclusion. Second, amnesties only encourage more illegal immigration and a bigger supply of low-skilled workers. When the newly amnestied workers demand better pay, they are fired and replaced by the newcomers, who are hungrier for the work.
OPINION
February 18, 2001 | DAN STEIN, Dan Stein is executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform
Symbolism is important in politics, and the fact that President Bush chose Mexico for his first foreign visit says a lot. Mexico holds the potential to be one of our most promising foreign relationships or one of our biggest headaches. Bush is wise to put it at the top of his foreign policy agenda. On the bright side, with the election of Vicente Fox as president, Mexico has freed itself of the yoke of 70 years of corrupt one-party rule.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pairing up, they barged into the Santa Ana laundermat and fanned out in opposite directions, swiftly moving in on their targets. "We're with the Marriott," said Teri Michalski, raising her voice above the din of clothes dryers and thrusting a flier at a startled man. "If you or someone you know needs a job, our address is on top."
OPINION
February 9, 2002
We shouldn't be surprised at the abysmal education figures ("L.A. Workers Held Back by Low Education Rate," Feb. 5) because the government's immigration policies have created an underclass by design. "Family reunification" immigration sounds admirable; however, the real meaning is that no standards of employability are applied to legal immigrants using that provision, even basic literacy. About one-third of current legal immigrants have not graduated from high school--300,000 per year.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enron Corp. stock plunged to a 52-week low Wednesday as Wall Street reacted to Tuesday's surprise resignation of Jeffrey K. Skilling, chief executive of the energy-trading giant and one of the main architects of its bold business strategy.
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