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Lowell Bergman

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L owell Bergman, the hard-driving "Frontline" producer whose investigation into the tobacco industry inspired the 1999 Oscar-nominated movie "The Insider," will appear tonight on KCET after an encore presentation of his documentary "Blackout," which focuses on California's power predicament. In collaboration with several New York Times reporters, Bergman crisscrossed the country this spring, following money, documents, deals and friendships.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L owell Bergman, the hard-driving "Frontline" producer whose investigation into the tobacco industry inspired the 1999 Oscar-nominated movie "The Insider," will appear tonight on KCET after an encore presentation of his documentary "Blackout," which focuses on California's power predicament. In collaboration with several New York Times reporters, Bergman crisscrossed the country this spring, following money, documents, deals and friendships.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
On the screen was Mike Wallace of "60 Minutes," the biggest of the big stars on the biggest, most profitable CBS series of them all. There he was in his protective vest one Sunday last September, inside maximum-security Pelican Bay, California's controversial high-tech dungeon that houses the worst of the state's bad apples, asking tough questions about alleged inhumane treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1998
Thank you for Myron Levin's article on "The Untitled Tobacco Project" ("A Filtered Look at Tobacco Row," Nov. 29). It was particularly engaging to be interviewed by someone with such an extensive background in reporting on the tobacco story. We would like to make one important comment. Contrary to an impression Levin may have received from Mike Wallace, there were no changes to the major content of our film as a concession to Wallace. The major changes he sought had to do with who ought to be the story's central protagonist at CBS, he or "60 Minutes" producer Lowell Bergman, and his capitulation to corporate pressure in pulling the interview with Jeffrey Wigand.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1998
Thank you for Myron Levin's article on "The Untitled Tobacco Project" ("A Filtered Look at Tobacco Row," Nov. 29). It was particularly engaging to be interviewed by someone with such an extensive background in reporting on the tobacco story. We would like to make one important comment. Contrary to an impression Levin may have received from Mike Wallace, there were no changes to the major content of our film as a concession to Wallace. The major changes he sought had to do with who ought to be the story's central protagonist at CBS, he or "60 Minutes" producer Lowell Bergman, and his capitulation to corporate pressure in pulling the interview with Jeffrey Wigand.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2002 | Bloomberg News
News Corp.'s FX Networks and Artisan Entertainment are making a television movie on the collapse of Enron Corp., the first TV drama announced about the failed energy company. Former "60 Minutes" producer Lowell Bergman will be a consultant, FX spokesman John Solberg said. The movie, expected to be carried on the FX cable network, doesn't have a cast or director yet, he said. Robert Cooper will be executive producer. As head of original movies at AOL Time Warner Inc.'
BUSINESS
March 28, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Film and television studio Artisan Entertainment Inc. said it bought rights to the life story of Enron Corp. Vice President Sherron S. Watkins and the upcoming book "Power Failure" to turn into a television movie. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Artisan is best known for releasing the hit independent film "The Blair Witch Project" in 1999. Its recently formed Artisan Television wing is a supplier of made-for-TV movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Celine Wright
Does the story of Edward Snowden not scream political thriller? The 29-year-old analyst disappeared from his Hong Kong hotel room a day after his identity was revealed as the person responsible for leaking secrets about U.S. government surveillance programs.  In his 12-minute video interview with the Guardian's Glenn Greenwald, Snowden said the CIA could grab him at any moment or pay off a Chinese triad to kill him. PHOTOS: Famous document-leakers...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | Tony Perry
First the stipulation that "Black Money," a "Frontline" look at international bribery, is first-class journalism: high-minded, fact-filled and balanced, with some eye-catching visuals. How could it be anything but stellar given the presence of correspondent Lowell Bergman, one of the top investigative journalists in the nation, if not the world?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
As one of the first women to hold a position of power on Wall Street, Marion O. Sandler was notable even before she and her husband, Herbert, spent 43 years building Oakland's World Savings Bank into such a major - and ultimately controversial - adjustable mortgage lender. Sandler, the daughter of Jewish immigrants from Lithuania and Russia, exploited her keen analytic skills to become Dominick & Dominick's first female executive in 1955 and joined Oppenheimer & Co. as a savings and loan analyst in 1961.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
On the screen was Mike Wallace of "60 Minutes," the biggest of the big stars on the biggest, most profitable CBS series of them all. There he was in his protective vest one Sunday last September, inside maximum-security Pelican Bay, California's controversial high-tech dungeon that houses the worst of the state's bad apples, asking tough questions about alleged inhumane treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With each passing day, there's seemingly a new surge in California's energy crisis. "Frontline" addresses that hot-button issue tonight in an hour aptly titled "Blackout" (9 p.m. KCET, 10 p.m. KVCR).
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | Scott Sandell, Times Staff Writer
Tonight's "Frontline" documentary, "Chasing the Sleeper Cell," explores what has become a footnote in the war against terrorism and yet has major implications in the U.S. In September 2002, federal agents arrested a group of Arab Americans in a town near Buffalo, N.Y., suspected of being an Al Qaeda cell lying in wait for a signal to carry out attacks.
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