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Lowell Davis

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NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowell Davis ponders the question: What does he like about modern civilization? He puffs on his corncob pipe for a long moment before deciding, "I can't think of a damned thing." Davis has chosen to live in the past. His past. On a 60-acre plot in southwest Missouri, Davis, an artist-eccentric, has re-created a way of life that he remembers nostalgically from his boyhood on a family farm in Red Oak, now a ghost town 23 miles to the north of what used to be Route 66.
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NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowell Davis ponders the question: What does he like about modern civilization? He puffs on his corncob pipe for a long moment before deciding, "I can't think of a damned thing." Davis has chosen to live in the past. His past. On a 60-acre plot in southwest Missouri, Davis, an artist-eccentric, has re-created a way of life that he remembers nostalgically from his boyhood on a family farm in Red Oak, now a ghost town 23 miles to the north of what used to be Route 66.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, San Diego County Arts Editor
That tiny theater turned 50 on Wednesday, and the late Lowell Davies, whose life enriched and was enriched by it, was honored by the dedication of a playhouse in his name. By now the nation knows that the sight lines of the Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park are second to none, stretching back to a colorful past and forward to a seemingly boundless future. So on Wednesday morning, the theater's staff, supporters and dignitaries feted the Globe with a gala "Encaenia"--Latin for "a dedicatory festival."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, San Diego County Arts Editor
That tiny theater turned 50 on Wednesday, and the late Lowell Davies, whose life enriched and was enriched by it, was honored by the dedication of a playhouse in his name. By now the nation knows that the sight lines of the Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park are second to none, stretching back to a colorful past and forward to a seemingly boundless future. So on Wednesday morning, the theater's staff, supporters and dignitaries feted the Globe with a gala "Encaenia"--Latin for "a dedicatory festival."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
David Atherton, former music director of the San Diego Symphony, will re-enter the local music scene next June with a 10-day music festival at the Old Globe Theatre. The British maestro said this week that his "Mainly Mozart" festival will include seven orchestral concerts with Atherton on the podium and two programs of chamber music. Atherton has been absent from San Diego music-making since he resigned his symphony post in February, 1987, during the orchestra's canceled season.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now that this year's Kingston Mainly Mozart Festival is over, it seems appropriate to review its contribution to the local music scene. The 3-year-old festival not only competes with other local arts organizations for ever-diminishing private financial support, but it also receives funding from the San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture. For the 1991 fiscal year, Mainly Mozart received $26,209 from the Transient Occupancy Taxes allocated by the commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
Unlike movie stunt men, who know theirs is a high-risk profession, orchestra directors court a more subtle kind of uncertainty. David Atherton can attest to that. When he was music director of the San Diego Symphony from 1980 to 1987, the struggling orchestra's fiscal profile was a continuous roller-coaster ride that finally derailed in the canceled 1986-87 season, leading to Atherton's abrupt departure.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | JOSH LEMIEUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lowell Davis recalls the days when Red Oak was a real town, where scores of men, women and children lived and dreamed. Then the town died, and it seemed destined to be a lonely memory, hidden beyond trees and corn fields as Route 66 drifts west toward the Great Plains. But unlike the quiet deaths of many Midwestern communities, Red Oak survives--if only by force of Davis' imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Irish playwright Brian Friel is great because he acknowledges the insufficiency of language. When the talking stops and his characters bow to the power of music--or silence--Friel's plays overflow with emotion. In his 1990 play "Dancing at Lughnasa," which just closed at the South Coast Rep, five sisters resigned to unending rural poverty come alive when a broken-down radio momentarily blasts out a danceable tune.
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