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Lowell Liebermann

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January 19, 1998 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The Long Beach Symphony convened Saturday in the Terrace Theater with the world premiere of a new work by Lowell Liebermann, a young and prolific New York-born, Juilliard-trained composer. Liebermann's "Loss of Breath," Opus 58, inspired by an Edgar Allan Poe short story of the same name, is a thoroughly tonal, audience-friendly piece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1998 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The Long Beach Symphony convened Saturday in the Terrace Theater with the world premiere of a new work by Lowell Liebermann, a young and prolific New York-born, Juilliard-trained composer. Liebermann's "Loss of Breath," Opus 58, inspired by an Edgar Allan Poe short story of the same name, is a thoroughly tonal, audience-friendly piece.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1998 | John Henken, John Henken is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Difficult as it is, getting a premiere is not the hardest step on the road to repertory for a new piece of music; it's getting on the next program and the one after that, acquiring critical mass in the consciousness of the musical world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1998 | John Henken, John Henken is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Difficult as it is, getting a premiere is not the hardest step on the road to repertory for a new piece of music; it's getting on the next program and the one after that, acquiring critical mass in the consciousness of the musical world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy Muffitt, the third of five music director candidates conducting the Long Beach Symphony this year, seems to favor smooth, rounded physical and conceptual gestures. At best, this leads to an oceanic, tidal wave pull and force in the music. At worst, it means turning in place without going anywhere. Unfortunately, in a three-part concert Saturday at the Terrace Theater, the big piece, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4, which closed the program, suffered the most by going nowhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the socially minded, the inexhaustibly quotable composer Ned Rorem once defined concerts as "that which surrounds intermission." Well, David Troy Francis' piano recital Sunday afternoon had no intermission and it did have Rorem; confounding for stray socialites, no doubt, but a double blessing for the rest of his attentive audience at the Neighborhood Church in Pasadena. The local pianist's compact program was consistently absorbing, whether in lyrical repose or propulsive fury.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2001 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Compressing the work of both professional and nonprofessional camera crews who followed the contestants of the 11th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition around for close to three weeks in June, producer-director Peter Rosen has put together a colorful, necessarily fragmented 90-minute documentary on the competition, held, as always, in Fort Worth. Called "The Cliburn: Playing on the Edge," it can been seen locally tonight on KCET.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Unlike certain superstar flutists, Paula Robison isn't content to read halfheartedly through Baroque sonatas at her recitals these days. Instead, she took on a tough program at the Bing Theater of the County Museum of Art Wednesday night, with the first half weighted toward American composers--often young ones--and the second anchored in France. Moreover, Robison pulled it off with style and flair, as well as formidable technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1998 | MARK SWED
To what proportion the classical Grammy nominations mirror popular taste, the concerns of collectors or the interests of the music business is hard to figure out. For instance, the three conductors who have loomed largest in Grammy lore--Georg Solti, Pierre Boulez and Robert Shaw--have practically nothing in common. But all are again prominent nominees this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1997 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Instrumental virtuosity, such as the type that James Galway commands, can be a mixed blessing. It certainly proved to be in the popular flutist's latest local recital, Saturday at Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. On the one hand, Galway's famed technique allowed him to leap all technical hurdles with the greatest of ease.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People noticed when Herbert von Karajan hired young Irishman James Galway as principal flutist for the Berlin Philharmonic in 1969, and even more so when Galway left six years later to launch a solo career. Now turning 60 in December, the man with the golden flute returned to Royce Hall on Thursday evening as loose, as genial and as individual as ever. Since going solo, Galway has been releasing records at a two-a-year clip, and BMG has culled a 15-CD set to celebrate the milestone year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Pianist Stephen Hough has become a resource for CD aficionados because of the reams of out-of-the-way repertoire he has been setting down for the hardy Hyperion label. If you're curious about the piano concertos of Xaver Scharwenka, Emil von Sauer or Lowell Liebermann, Hough has some records for you. If you've always wanted to explore the solo piano music of Federico Mompou or York Bowen, Hough can oblige.
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