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May 16, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Researchers have some reassuring news for the legions of coffee drinkers who can't get through the day without a latte, cappuccino, iced mocha, double-shot of espresso or a plain old cuppa joe: That coffee habit may help you live longer. A new study that tracked the health and coffee consumption of more than 400,000 older adults for nearly 14 years found that java drinkers were less likely to die during the study than their counterparts who eschewed the brew. In fact, men and women who averaged four or five cups of coffee per day had the lowest risk of death, according to a report in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Drinking more coffee may decrease your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study shows. Researchers from Harvard University found that people who increased their coffee consumption by at least one cup per day over a period of years were 11% less likely to get Type 2 diabetes compared with people whose coffee-drinking habits didn't change. On the flip side, people who dialed back their coffee habit by at least one cup a day were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.
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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Drinking a moderate amount of alcohol may have its health benefits, and lowering the risk of Type 2 diabetes could be one of them, a study finds. Researchers followed 38,031 men who had not been diagnosed with diabetes or cancer and who were part of the Health Professionals Follow-Up study. Changes in their drinking habits over the years were noted. After four years, those who were light drinkers at the start of the study (drinking zero to 4.9 grams a day) and increased their alcohol consumption to moderate levels (5 to 29.9 grams a day)
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
In their continuing quest to prove that coffee is indeed a health food, medical researchers analyzed the health records of nearly 180,000 Americans and determined that the ones with a daily java habit were less likely to get a common type of liver cancer than their less-caffeinated counterparts. The study , presented this week at the American Assn. for Cancer Research's annual meeting in San Diego, may not be enough to get your coffee break covered by your health insurance, but the results were striking.
SCIENCE
August 11, 2009 | Shara Yurkiewicz
If people would just do four things -- engage in regular physical activity, eat a healthy diet, not smoke and avoid becoming obese -- they could slash their risk of diabetes, heart attack, stroke or cancer by 80%, a new report has found. But less than 10% of the 23,153 people in the multiyear study -- published in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine -- actually lived their lives this way. "The study has such a simple straightforward focus on making the point that prevention works in preventing serious disease," said Dr. J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society.
HEALTH
October 26, 2009
What you eat may help reduce the risk of diabetes, says a recently released report from Harvard Medical School. Among its findings: Coffee: One cup a day is linked to a 13% reduction in diabetes risk. Two to three cups a day is linked to a 42% reduction in risk. Alcohol : Men who have two to four drinks a week had a 26% lower risk of diabetes, compared with abstainers. Those who have one or more drinks a day had a 43% lower risk. Nuts: Women who ate nuts or peanut butter five times a week had a 20% to 30% lower risk than women who only rarely eat nuts or peanut butter.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Drinking more coffee may decrease your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study shows. Researchers from Harvard University found that people who increased their coffee consumption by at least one cup per day over a period of years were 11% less likely to get Type 2 diabetes compared with people whose coffee-drinking habits didn't change. On the flip side, people who dialed back their coffee habit by at least one cup a day were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
We all know we should eat more fiber. Here's some incentive: Eating more of it could help you live longer, but the kind of fiber you eat may be key. The findings came via a study released online Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine . Researchers used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health study that asked people age 50 to 71 what they ate for the last year and how often they ate it. Researchers followed the...
NEWS
September 6, 2010
If you're thinking of jumping on the low-carb diet bandwagon or have already jumped, consider this: new research findings reveal that vegetable-based low-carb diets may be linked with lower overall mortality rates and lower death rates from cardiovascular disease and cancer. The study used data from the Nurses' Health study and included 85,168 women age 34 to 59 and 44,548 men age 40 to 75 who were on low-carb diets that derived protein from animal or plant sources. The women were followed from 1980 to to 2006, and the men from 1986 to 2006.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Poking around in the petunias, fixing the car or puttering around on other hobbies can cut the risk of a heart attack or stroke by more than a quarter among people 60 and older, researchers said Tuesday. A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine tracked the behavior and health of nearly 4,000 people 60 and older in Stockholm for about 12 1/2 years, starting in 1997. Specifically, the researchers looked at something called NEPA, or non-exercise physical activity.
SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40% more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found. The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health - even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive. The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Poking around in the petunias, fixing the car or puttering around on other hobbies can cut the risk of a heart attack or stroke by more than a quarter among people 60 and older, researchers said Tuesday. A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine tracked the behavior and health of nearly 4,000 people 60 and older in Stockholm for about 12 1/2 years, starting in 1997. Specifically, the researchers looked at something called NEPA, or non-exercise physical activity.
SCIENCE
November 7, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
If you take statins to lower your cholesterol, you may also be lowering your risk of death from cancer, new research suggests. A report published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine is one of a number of recent papers suggesting that statins not only limit the growth of cancer cells but also make them more vulnerable to certain therapies. "Regular statin use before and after a diagnosis of cancer could theoretically reduce cancer-related mortality," wrote study leader Sune F. Nielsen, a biochemist at the University of Copenhagen who based his findings on an analysis of more than 5.5 million people in Denmark.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The use of a daily multivitamin slightly lowers the risk of cancer in older men, according to a large, randomized study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The men in the trial took the common multivitamin Centrum Silver, which is produced by Pfizer. The results are at odds with a host of other studies in recent years that have shown no positive effect of vitamins on cancer rates -- and some that have found such supplements can be harmful . But many of those studies were focused on individual vitamins, such as vitamin D and vitamin B6, that animal research suggested had cancer-preventing properties.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
With interest rates at near-record lows, these have not been good times for investors looking to generate low-risk income. Money-market accounts are paying an average of 0.5%. (Think about that: A $1-million deposit into an average money-market will yield a whopping $5,000 a year.) Even five-year CDs are yielding just 1.5% on average. So, where's an income-hungry investor to turn? One option is high-yield bonds, which are paying about 6% but carry risk that issuing companies may default, eroding the bonds' value.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Is there something fishy going on with omega-3 fatty acids? For years, major health and medical organizations have recommended fish oil supplements rich in omega-3s to reduce the threat of heart disease. In Europe, where support is particularly enthusiastic, a doctor's failure to recommend the supplements is viewed by some as bordering on malpractice. But several recent studies have raised questions about the benefits of fish oil, sparking no small amount of confusion. A report published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
August 11, 1986
The United States is grappling with an eight-year-long pattern of increased rabies among wild animals, but the deadly disease has struck few pets and no people. This year, 3,040 rabies cases were reported to the national Centers for Disease Control as of July 20, up 5% from the 2,892 cases at the same point a year ago and part of the trend, said Dr. Daniel Fishbein, a rabies specialist with the Atlanta-based CDC.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
Flu in an infant can be a scary experience. These infants suffer a higher rate of complications compared with older babies who have the flu. However, pregnant women who get a flu vaccine give their babies some protection, according to a study published Monday. Babies under 6 months of age are born with what appears to be some natural protection from flu passed on by the mother's antibodies. However this natural immunity isn't totally protective and pregnant women are widely encouraged to get an annual flu shot to protect themselves and their babies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in South Los Angeles, Precious Jackson said she was attracted to the bad boys. "My father was a bad boy," she said. He was a hustler, a pimp, a drug addict. But Jackson also saw him as a gentleman who provided for his family. "I chose guys that emulated my dad," she said. The men she dated offered an escape from life with her overprotective grandmother, who raised her from the age of 5. "They had to be from the streets; they couldn't be a square," Jackson said. "I had to have some excitement.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Score one for man's best friend. For folks who start to sneeze and wheeze as soon as they enter a dog owner's home, new research may come as a surprise: Dust from households with dogs may help protect against an asthma-related respiratory infection, according to results presented Tuesday at this year's General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Previous research has pointed to the idea that sharing space with cats and dogs could actually be beneficial to the immune system.
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