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Loyd Sigmon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A SigAlert was issued Thursday morning from the front seat of a white Cadillac stuck in a traffic jam on the southbound San Diego Freeway. Loyd Sigmon shook his head at the crush of cars inching along with him out of the San Fernando Valley and turned to his passenger in the back seat. "I'm not sure I'm going to forgive you for getting me into this ," Sigmon warned. "This traffic is miserable. I've just about had it." Sigmon, 81, had every right to issue the personal advisory.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
The "lyrics" are music to few people's ears, but drive-time commuters certainly perk theirs up at the term "SigAlert" on the radio. The expression is named for Loyd C. Sigmon, who joined Los Angeles radio station KMPC-AM in 1941 as an engineer and eventually became a partner with Gene Autry in its parent company, Golden West Broadcasting. Born to a Stigler, Okla.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1986 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
To California's freeway travelers, it's a term that means trouble--a major traffic tie-up has clogged the lanes. But it's also a term that means confusion, even to veteran traffic watchers and the CHP. So just what is a SigAlert? The definitions vary, but one thing is clear--and Loyd Sigmon knows it better than anyone else. "It's the question I'm asked most," said traffic reporter Bill Keene of KNX radio. "People want to know what 'SigAlert' stands for." Loyd Sigmon knows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A SigAlert was issued Thursday morning from the front seat of a white Cadillac stuck in a traffic jam on the southbound San Diego Freeway. Loyd Sigmon shook his head at the crush of cars inching along with him out of the San Fernando Valley and turned to his passenger in the back seat. "I'm not sure I'm going to forgive you for getting me into this ," Sigmon warned. "This traffic is miserable. I've just about had it." Sigmon, 81, had every right to issue the personal advisory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
The "lyrics" are music to few people's ears, but drive-time commuters certainly perk theirs up at the term "SigAlert" on the radio. The expression is named for Loyd C. Sigmon, who joined Los Angeles radio station KMPC-AM in 1941 as an engineer and eventually became a partner with Gene Autry in its parent company, Golden West Broadcasting. Born to a Stigler, Okla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | Jin Whang, (714) 966-7440.
A second panel discussion by the artists and curators of the "sig-alert 2" exhibition will take place from 8 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday at the Cal State Fullerton Grand Central Art Gallery. The panel consists of "sig-alert 2" artists Sally Elesby, Habib Kheradyar and Tyler Stallings and exhibition organizer John Spiak. "Sig-alert," dedicated to radio pioneer Loyd "Sig" Sigmon, who coined the term, was originally exhibited at the Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe. The show displays the works of L.A. artists who find new routes around traffic using alternative and artistic means.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1986
Patricia Lynn, a veteran radio and television performer best known locally as the featured singer on "Bill Stulla's Parlor Party" in the mid-1950s, has died of cancer at her Sherman Oaks home. Miss Lynn, who died Sunday, was believed to be in her 60s. She started her career on the National Broadcasting Corp. staff in San Francisco in the 1930s, a period when that city was better known for its radio productions than was Los Angeles. She also was a featured singer at the Fairmont Hotel there.
MAGAZINE
September 19, 1993 | Kathleen Moloney
A selection of traffic reporter slang: bam and scram n . a hit-and-run accident. beast L.A. interchange n. the East Los Angeles interchange, where the Santa Monica eastbound meets the Santa Ana and Pomona freeways. "They were stuck in gridlock at the beast L.A. interchange when he proposed." bangers and mash n. a non-injury accident. "A bangers and mash on the 405 southbound at Beach Boulevard is clogging traffic clear to Cherry Avenue."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000 | Steve Harvey
Don't stop the music! I joked the other day that a sign snapped in China by Jack Rozint of Laguna Beach meant that trumpet playing in automobiles is forbidden there (see photo). Well, the Chinese consulate in L.A. was not amused. A representative wrote, "The sign means 'DO NOT HONK.' It usually appears in a residential area to keep it peaceful and undisturbed. People in China all know about it." OK, fine. Let's not have any confusion on that point. The last thing Only in L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997 | STEVE HARVEY
Diane Kevorkian of Rancho Palos Verdes, owner of a red Pontiac Fiero, ordered a personalized license plate that was an abbreviated version of "Lady in Red." No sooner did she receive LADYNRD than someone asked her why she wanted a license plate that said "Lady Nerd." * FROM OUR MELTING POT: Since we reported the Genghis Khan Japanese restaurant, we've received sightings of a Mandarin Shogun eatery in Merced from David Chan of L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1986 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
To California's freeway travelers, it's a term that means trouble--a major traffic tie-up has clogged the lanes. But it's also a term that means confusion, even to veteran traffic watchers and the CHP. So just what is a SigAlert? The definitions vary, but one thing is clear--and Loyd Sigmon knows it better than anyone else. "It's the question I'm asked most," said traffic reporter Bill Keene of KNX radio. "People want to know what 'SigAlert' stands for." Loyd Sigmon knows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Sherman Oaks residents Tuesday declared a SigAlert over congestion in their neighborhood. Homeowner Loyd Sigmon, inventor of the SigAlert system that radio stations use to warn of major freeway problems, phoned neighbors to alert them to a new development in a fight over a hillside building plan. Thus summoned, several dozen residents gathered on a drizzly hilltop to hear City Councilman Michael Woo say he has joined their 10-year protest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
Catherine Adamic of the California Film Commission reports that a few days before Staples Center opened, a visitor from the East Coast took one look at the huge edifice and remarked, "Gee, they sure need a lot of office supplies in Los Angeles." EMULATE SOFT DRINK CITY? Huntington Beach, you may recall, accepted $300,000 from Coca-Cola so the company could say its product is the city's official soft drink. What's the next step in creative government financing?
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