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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Jason Song
Loyola Law School administrators once justified accepting extra students or raising tuition because the market virtually guaranteed prospective attorneys a high-paying job after graduation. But faced with growing alumni complaints that they can't find employment, Dean Victor Gold and other administrators decided this year to do something they had never done before: They accepted fewer students. Loyola, southwest of downtown Los Angeles, enrolled 20 fewer applicants than last year, about an 5% drop - and a loss of about $1 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo and Howard Blume
Los Angeles County prosecutors have dropped their case against a Miramonte Elementary School teacher who became embroiled in a child-abuse scandal that rocked the Los Angeles school district and resulted in the costliest settlements in the system's history. The trial of Martin Springer was set to begin Wednesday morning, but his accuser, a 12-year-old girl who alleged that he had touched her leg several times, decided not to testify, officials said. "She's not saying these things didn't happen," Deputy Dist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
A series of art events is planned in celebration of the formal dedication of Loyola Law School's new campus, designed by Frank O. Gehry & Associates. Gehry will deliver a slide lecture on his work at 8 p.m. Friday in Loyola's Merryfield Hall, 1441 W. Olympic Blvd. "The Spiritual Eye: Religious Imagery in Contemporary Los Angeles Art," an exhibition in the Law School Gallery, also opens Friday with a reception from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - State Sen. Roderick Wright will remain a member of California's upper house until an appeal is decided on his eight felony convictions for lying about where he lived. But the Democratic lawmaker from Inglewood is being removed as chairman of the powerful Senate Governmental Organization Committee, which oversees gambling and liquor laws. He was allowed to keep his membership on the Senate's budget, energy and human services committees. "Unless and until there is a final conviction for a felony," state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998
Loyola Law School administrators announced Monday that U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) will give the commencement address at the 77th annual ceremonies May 17. Kerry is serving his third term as senator and is a member of several committees, including banking, housing, urban affairs, commerce, science and transportation, foreign relations, small business, and intelligence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
If ever a theme demanded an uncluttered, contemplative exhibition space, it is "The Spiritual Eye: Religious Imagery in Contemporary Los Angeles Art." What the show got is a busy lounge at the Loyola Law School. Art resides above sofas, clusters on columns and sometimes hangs so close to signs that you can't see the Pietas for the placards. Don't get me wrong. I'm for Loyola's enlightened effort to make its campus a place of visual interest and cultural importance.
MAGAZINE
May 31, 1987
And now for a word from one of the inhabitants (or is it inmates?) of Frank O. Gehry's "architecture"--in this case the Loyola Law School ("Grand Designs," May 3, by Elizabeth Venant). The interior of this building has all the warmth and charm of a cross between a mental hospital and a minimum-security prison. It lacks any attributes of a human habitat; it is a human warehouse. In the apt words of The Times' beloved urban good-taste maven, Sam Hall Kaplan, there is more to architecture than whether it photographs well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985
If "spiritual art" belongs only in hushed galleries and not where there are other activities, how does Suzanne Muchnic explain the "Last Supper" in a dining room, or the Sistine Chapel, which is really a church (" Spiritual Eye' Lost at Loyola Law School," April 9)? Art is not a dead body to be dissected in a lab anymore than it is just another decoration like the wallpaper. I doubt the artists represented in the "The Spiritual Eye: Religious Imagery in Contemporary Los Angeles Art" exhibit at the Loyola Law School did their work solely to have it analyzed by an art critic.
REAL ESTATE
February 14, 1993
RE the article by H. Jane Lehman, "Does Real Estate Have a New Friend?" (Jan. 17). It is self-destructing for California real estate developers to urge the Clinton Administration to rescue them by raising FHA loan limits so their customers can go deeper in hock to buy their overpriced products. The country is too deep in debt as it is. Many of California's problems are rooted in our outlandish cost of housing. Propping it up with government subsidies will only exacerbate the problem in the long run, and keep market forces from applying an overdue, if painful, corrective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992
Maybe I misread the facts in "Merchant's Rising Death Toll Raises Questions" (Feb. 22), but I hope it would seem reasonable to most people that two men who enter a jewelry store with guns drawn are not there to make a purchase. As a police officer, I far from condone vigilantism, but if Lance E. Thomas' most recent acts in defense of his business and life are looked upon by some as executions, then I suggest that all business owners close their doors immediately because armed robbery has just been deemed a justifiable act. How would Laura Levenson (criminal law teacher at Loyola Law School)
SPORTS
January 11, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
A long and contentious legal battle between Alex Rodriguez and Major League Baseball came to a head Saturday when arbitrator Fredric Horowitz slapped the New York Yankees slugger with a 162-game, possibly career-ending suspension. The ruling reduced an original 211-game penalty but banned Rodriguez for the 2014 season and postseason. Rodriguez, punished for his involvement in the Biogenesis scandal, has vowed to continue his fight. His attorney said he will file a suit in federal court Monday contesting Saturday's decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Jason Song
Loyola Law School administrators once justified accepting extra students or raising tuition because the market virtually guaranteed prospective attorneys a high-paying job after graduation. But faced with growing alumni complaints that they can't find employment, Dean Victor Gold and other administrators decided this year to do something they had never done before: They accepted fewer students. Loyola, southwest of downtown Los Angeles, enrolled 20 fewer applicants than last year, about an 5% drop - and a loss of about $1 million.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | Staff and wire reports
For the city of San Jose, four years of waiting had been long enough. The city filed an antitrust lawsuit against Major League Baseball on Tuesday, not necessarily to win in court but to gain leverage for a settlement in which the Oakland Athletics could move to San Jose. "All we're looking for is for the A's to come to downtown San Jose," said Joe Cotchett , the attorney representing San Jose. The suit laid bare the hostility between the city of San Jose and the San Francisco Giants, the team that has insisted it would neither surrender nor sell its right to keep the A's out of San Jose.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
It seems like everybody wants to write a cookbook these days. But there's a lot more to it than just gathering a bunch of great recipes. Two of Southern California's finest writers will take you behind the scenes May 3 at Surfas Culinary District in Culver City in a combination cooking class and discussion sponsored by the Los Angeles County Bar Assn. Between them, Martha Rose Shulman and Clifford Wright have written more than 45 cookbooks. Wright's “Mediterranean Feast” was named the best book of the year by the James Beard Foundation in 2000.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court deliberated Wednesday on whether the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies legally married same-sex couples federal benefits, meets constitutional standards. The arguments over DOMA mark the second time the court has held a hearing related to same-sex marriage, with justices debating California's Proposition 8 on Tuesday. The court has released the audio recording and the transcript of the oral arguments, featuring persistent skepticism from liberal justices on whether DOMA, which was signed into law in 1996, is inherently prejudiced and thus invalid.
OPINION
November 28, 2012
Re "States press groups to list donors," Nov. 26 The argument by nonprofit groups resisting disclosure of donors described in this article - that they are "caught between conflicting state and federal regulations" - is a specious one. Federal tax and election laws do not require disclosure, but these laws do not in any way forbid disclosure under other applicable law, including state disclosure requirements. Ellen Aprill Los Angeles The writer is a professor at Loyola Law School.
OPINION
September 3, 2004
Your Sept. 1 editorial, "Schwarzenegger's Close-Up," begins with the "intriguing possibility" raised by Tony Quinn, a GOP political consultant, that the "U.S. Constitution doesn't seem to bar Austrian-born Arnold Schwarzenegger from becoming vice president." The editorial wonders how he could constitutionally serve if the presidency went vacant. The last sentence of the 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1804, reads: "But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of president shall be eligible to that of vice president of the United States."
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993
When Gehry designed our house, the neighbors called it un-American. Now they ask to come in for tours. When he designed Loyola Law School, where I teach, on-campus critics wanted to fire him. Now those same folks boast that they had a role in building the structure. Gehry's critics eventually turn around and embrace him, some simply because his reputation has grown, others because they finally feel the subtle and completely original aesthetic of his architecture. The same reception will be given to Disney Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2012 | Carol J. Williams
The court-martial of Marine Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich at Camp Pendleton for his role in two dozen civilian deaths in the Iraqi village of Haditha has highlighted a legal peril for modern military personnel: determining who is the enemy. Troops these days fight in tense, foreign enclaves where terrorists wear no uniforms and take cover among women and children. They are on a mission to engage the enemy but are expected to hold their fire against civilians, a sacred tenet of international law. Military and international law experts say the case against Wuterich has shown that some troops have little understanding of the laws of war and nagging mistrust of local townfolk on dusty streets and courtyards that quickly ignite into battlefields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2011
Burt Styler Emmy-winning TV writer Burt Styler, 86, an Emmy-winning TV writer who had a long association with Bob Hope, died of heart failure June 13 at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, his family said. Styler won an Emmy in 1972 for an episode of "All in the Family" called "Edith's Problem," in which Jean Stapleton's character dealt with menopause. He had a long career writing for television, with credits in such series as "The Life of Riley," "My Favorite Martian," "The Brady Bunch" and "The Carol Burnett Show.
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