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Lubrizol Corp

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BUSINESS
December 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Wins Suit on Oil Additive: Lubrizol Corp. was found guilty of infringing on Exxon Corp.'s patent for a motor oil additive used to prevent engine corrosion. The Cleveland-based specialty chemical manufacturer said it would appeal the ruling. An injunction barring the company from using the copper-derived additive hasn't been filed, a spokesman for Lubrizol said.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Unit Wins Damages From Lubrizol: A federal judge more than doubled damages against Cleveland-based Lubrizol Corp. to $129 million for infringing on a 1989 Exxon Chemical Co. patent for a motor oil additive. U.S. District Judge Norman Black entered the award for Exxon after reviewing a jury award of $48 million, made last November. A Lubrizol spokesman said the company was disappointed and would appeal the judge's ruling.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Mycogen Corp., the first company to be given Environmental Protection Agency permission to test genetically engineered pesticides in the open field, plans to raise up to $24 million in an initial public stock offering. According to a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Mycogen plans to sell 1.6 million shares priced at $13 to $15 per share.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1987 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Mycogen has signed a three-year, $6-million research and development agreement with Kubota, a multibillion-dollar Japanese conglomerate, to develop agricultural biopesticides, the companies said Tuesday. The resulting joint venture will develop and market products in the Far East, but Mycogen will retain product and marketing rights elsewhere in the world, according to Jim Glynn, vice president and chief financial officer of the San Diego-based biotechnology company.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Two San Diego biotechnology companies, Gensia Pharmaceuticals and Mycogen, say they plan to to sell stock to the public, an indication that the stock market's perception of biotechnology issues may be improving. According to a registration statement filed with the federal Securities and Exchange Commission, Gensia Pharmaceuticals plans to sell 2.5 million shares in an initial public stock offering priced at $9 to $11 a share. The offering could raise up to $27.5 million.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2011 | By Alistair Barr and Polya Lesova
Berkshire Hathaway Inc. has announced that it will buy specialty-chemicals maker Lubrizol Corp. in a deal valued at almost $10 billion as Chairman Warren Buffett puts a big chunk of his cash pile to work. The Omaha company agreed to acquire Lubrizol for $135 a share in an all-cash deal, which has been approved by the boards of both companies. The deal was announced Monday. The deal is valued at about $9.7 billion, including around $700 million in net debt. That makes it Buffett's second-biggest acquisition in the last decade, after his 2010 purchase of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mycogen and Lubrizol Corp. on Thursday proposed a joint venture that would create one of the nation's largest companies in the biological crop protection industry. The joint venture will try to develop pest-resistant crops based in part on technology developed by Mycogen, a San Diego-based company that is researching and selling biopesticides. Also involved is Cleveland-based Lubrizol's Agrigenetics subsidiary, the nation's sixth-largest seed company.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
A former Berkshire Hathaway Inc. executive once considered a likely successor to Warren Buffett intentionally misled the investing guru about the stock he owned in a business that Berkshire later agreed to acquire, the company said. A report by the audit committee of Berkshire's board faults David Sokol for giving "misleadingly incomplete disclosures" about the timing and magnitude of his purchases of shares of Lubrizol Corp., which Berkshire agreed early this year to buy in a $9-billion deal.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: My 1971 Continental is in almost-new condition, except that it was designed for high-octane leaded fuel, which is no longer available. My gasoline station recommended Sim-U-Lead, made by Sta-Lube. Is this product better than nothing at all? Could it be harmful?--W.L. Answer: Sim-U-Lead is among the first barrage of additives that are supposed to take the place of lead in gasoline for older engines.
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