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Luc Desir

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NEWS
September 20, 1989
Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril, the president of Haiti, has commuted the life sentence of Luc Desir, the former secret police chief who directed hundreds of torture sessions during the Duvalier regime, a state-run newspaper said, quoting an Information Ministry statement. Desir was among 13 people who were pardoned or whose sentences were commuted on the first anniversary of Avril's rise to power. Desir's sentence was reduced to 30 years in prison.
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NEWS
September 20, 1989
Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril, the president of Haiti, has commuted the life sentence of Luc Desir, the former secret police chief who directed hundreds of torture sessions during the Duvalier regime, a state-run newspaper said, quoting an Information Ministry statement. Desir was among 13 people who were pardoned or whose sentences were commuted on the first anniversary of Avril's rise to power. Desir's sentence was reduced to 30 years in prison.
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NEWS
February 26, 1986 | United Press International
Mobs attacked luxurious homes belonging to former leaders of the Tontons Macoutes secret police today amid radio reports that 20 people had been poisoned by members of ousted President Jean-Claude Duvalier's private army. Two U.S. airlines, American and Eastern, canceled flights to the Caribbean nation today after thousands of protesters blocked off the Port-au-Prince airport Tuesday to prevent Duvalier supporters from fleeing the country.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent change of policy toward officials of the Duvalier era, the provisional government of Haiti announced Wednesday the arrests of two former security agents on charges of torture and murder. The government also said that other former officials suspected of human rights violations will be brought to justice and will not be permitted to leave the country.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The first serious rift surfaced in Haiti's new government Tuesday as a key member of the ruling National Council protested the departure of a former police chief linked with torture and disappearances. Nonetheless, the full council convened late in the day to announce a long-awaited, though general, economic and political program. The program, read over national television by Lt. Gen.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Looters tried Thursday tried to ransack properties held by suspected associates of Duvalier, but soldiers sent to patrol the downtown commercial district intercepted the crowds before they could break into any stores. In the hills surrounding Port-au-Prince, occasional gunshots were heard. In some cases, neighborhoods previously untouched by such activity became the scene of taunting mobs seeking revenge against members of the Tontons Macoutes, or bogeymen, Duvalier's personal militia.
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