Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLucas Belvaux
IN THE NEWS

Lucas Belvaux

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
"An Amazing Couple," the second installment in Lucas Belvaux's "The Trilogy" -- the French filmmaker's three thematically related, contemporaneous features -- revisits the classic bedroom farce with mixed results. After Alain (Francois Morel) discovers he needs surgery, he descends into a frenzied panic. Suffering the usual intimations of mortality, he initially tries to hide the news from his wife, Cecile (Ornella Muti).
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The third and final chapter in Lucas Belvaux's "The Trilogy" -- the French filmmaker's three complementary features -- brings the series to a satisfying end. This time the focus is on the gruff cop, Pascal Manise (Gilbert Melki), and his drug-addicted wife, Agnes (Dominique Blanc), who have played supporting roles in the preceding films, "On the Run" and "An Amazing Couple," and, perforce, in the lives of the other characters.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The third and final chapter in Lucas Belvaux's "The Trilogy" -- the French filmmaker's three complementary features -- brings the series to a satisfying end. This time the focus is on the gruff cop, Pascal Manise (Gilbert Melki), and his drug-addicted wife, Agnes (Dominique Blanc), who have played supporting roles in the preceding films, "On the Run" and "An Amazing Couple," and, perforce, in the lives of the other characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
"An Amazing Couple," the second installment in Lucas Belvaux's "The Trilogy" -- the French filmmaker's three thematically related, contemporaneous features -- revisits the classic bedroom farce with mixed results. After Alain (Francois Morel) discovers he needs surgery, he descends into a frenzied panic. Suffering the usual intimations of mortality, he initially tries to hide the news from his wife, Cecile (Ornella Muti).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In almost every movie there are characters that hang at the edge of the story, embroidering the scene, supplying distraction, perhaps even pushing along the plot. Sometimes, because the stars and the story aren't holding your attention or because that's exactly what the filmmaker wants to happen, your attention drifts to these characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2004 | Erin Ailworth
It begins as a thriller about an escaped convict. Roll credits. Begins again as a romantic comedy about a confused couple. Roll credits. And begins yet again as a melodrama about a cop and his junkie wife. Roll credits. Filmmaker Lucas Belvaux has said "The Trilogy," his Krzysztof Kieslowski-inspired trio of separate but linked films, can be seen individually or in any order. He recommends starting light, with a dramatic finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | By Robert Abele
Issues of criminality, responsibility and victimhood get a muscular workout in Lucas Belvaux's taut French thriller "Rapt," based on a true story of the 1978 kidnapping of a rich industrialist. When wealthy, arrogant business scion Stanislas Graff (Yvan Attal) is grabbed by a crack team of abductors who ask for 50 million Euros in ransom and send his severed finger as proof of their seriousness, the subsequent investigation — by authorities, his business partners and a rabid press corps — reveals an unflattering portrait of Graff's personal indiscretions (gambling, affairs)
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
THE MOVIE: "Madame Bovary" THE SETUP: An adaptation of Gustave Flaubert's mid-19th-Century French novel of Emma Bovary (Isabelle Huppert, pictured), whose marriage to a dreary country doctor, Charles (Jean-Francois Balmer, pictured), fails to fulfill her lust for life. So she shops till she drops and propels herself into a series of ill-fated affairs. THE LOOK: Emma has to be literature's ultimate fashion victim.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
In his subtle and superb "The Death of Mario Ricci" (at the Fox International for one week, starting today), film maker Claude Goretta finds in a small Swiss village the universe in microcosm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Susan King
The 18th City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival, which takes place April 21-28 at the Directors Guild of America, will present 41 feature films including three international premieres, 17 North American or U.S. premieres and 16 West Coast premieres. COLCOA, which is presented by the Franco-American Cultural Fund, will also include 20 new shorts, restoration premieres of classic French films such as Jean Cocteau's 1946 "Beauty and the Beast" and a tribute to the seminal New Wave director Francois Truffaut with a special program and a screening of his 1977 film, "The Man Who Loved Women.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
In almost every movie there are characters that hang at the edge of the story, embroidering the scene, supplying distraction, perhaps even pushing along the plot. Sometimes, because the stars and the story aren't holding your attention or because that's exactly what the filmmaker wants to happen, your attention drifts to these characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2004 | Erin Ailworth
It begins as a thriller about an escaped convict. Roll credits. Begins again as a romantic comedy about a confused couple. Roll credits. And begins yet again as a melodrama about a cop and his junkie wife. Roll credits. Filmmaker Lucas Belvaux has said "The Trilogy," his Krzysztof Kieslowski-inspired trio of separate but linked films, can be seen individually or in any order. He recommends starting light, with a dramatic finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The cinephile has a lot to choose from this week. Notable among the selections are "Downfall" (Sony, $30) and a collection of Claude Chabrol movies. "Downfall," the 2004 German drama that was nominated for an Oscar for best foreign-language film, manages to be simultaneously horrifying and mesmerizing as it painstakingly depicts the last days of Adolf Hitler hiding out in the claustrophobic bunker in Berlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1998 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Rock's Sad Tally: A record 19 people, 13 of them teenagers, died at rock concerts and festival events worldwide in 1997, according to a Chicago-based crowd safety consulting firm. "Every year concert fans needlessly die or are injured in the United States and around the world as a direct result of negligent or deficient concert planning and management," Crowd Management Strategies said in its annual report issued Monday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|