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Lucas Lawrence Mangope

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NEWS
February 10, 1988
Radio stations in southern Africa reported a coup in the tribal homeland of Bophuthatswana early today and said the whereabouts of President Lucas Lawrence Mangope were unknown. The government radio in Botswana, an independent country bordering the homeland, said shots were heard in the Bophuthatswana capital of Mmabatho. The radio quoted a Bophuthatswana army statement as saying Mangope had been deposed. Mangope has ruled Bophuthatswana since the homeland was declared independent 10 years ago.
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NEWS
March 12, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three white men in ripped khaki uniforms and boots lay sprawled Friday beside their bullet-riddled blue Mercedes-Benz. One man was dead, his head in a pool of gore, while the other two bled slowly into the red earth as they talked. They were from Naboomspruit, a farming town farther north, said Fanie Uys, his face contorted in pain and sweating in the brutal midday sun.
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NEWS
March 11, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bizarre black homeland government of Bophuthatswana, one of the strangest creations of apartheid, appeared close to collapse Thursday night after four days of raucous strikes, running street battles and scattered gunfire in the tiny capital. Thousands of chanting, cheering protesters celebrated by looting shops and burning and stoning vehicles in the dusty streets of Mmabatho after local radio reported that the autocratic president, Lucas Mangope, had fled by helicopter.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bizarre black homeland government of Bophuthatswana, one of the strangest creations of apartheid, appeared close to collapse Thursday night after four days of raucous strikes, running street battles and scattered gunfire in the tiny capital. Thousands of chanting, cheering protesters celebrated by looting shops and burning and stoning vehicles in the dusty streets of Mmabatho after local radio reported that the autocratic president, Lucas Mangope, had fled by helicopter.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three white men in ripped khaki uniforms and boots lay sprawled Friday beside their bullet-riddled blue Mercedes-Benz. One man was dead, his head in a pool of gore, while the other two bled slowly into the red earth as they talked. They were from Naboomspruit, a farming town farther north, said Fanie Uys, his face contorted in pain and sweating in the brutal midday sun.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the week's second major outbreak of violence in South Africa's black-ruled territories, Bophuthatswana police Wednesday fired on thousands of protesters demanding the resignation of homeland leader Lucas Lawrence Mangope. At least seven people died, and more than 450 were injured.
NEWS
February 10, 1988
Radio stations in southern Africa reported a coup in the tribal homeland of Bophuthatswana early today and said the whereabouts of President Lucas Lawrence Mangope were unknown. The government radio in Botswana, an independent country bordering the homeland, said shots were heard in the Bophuthatswana capital of Mmabatho. The radio quoted a Bophuthatswana army statement as saying Mangope had been deposed. Mangope has ruled Bophuthatswana since the homeland was declared independent 10 years ago.
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