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NEWS
August 27, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury in Newark on Friday acquitted 20 alleged members of the Lucchese crime family of New Jersey, dealing a major setback to federal prosecutors and ending the longest federal criminal trial in the nation's history. After deliberating for only 14 hours, the jury announced verdicts of not guilty to 77 counts related to alleged loan-sharking, gambling, drug dealing and fraudulent credit card operations spanning a 10-year period.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000
Anthony Corallo, 87, the former boss of the Lucchese crime family in New York who was serving a life sentence for racketeering. Known as "Tony Ducks" for his longtime ability to dodge government subpoenas and convictions, Corallo headed the Lucchese family through much of the 1970s and '80s. His reign was marked by an interest in labor racketeering, focusing on private trash-hauling and on big construction projects in Manhattan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1989 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writers
A man authorities describe as a New Jersey leader of an organized crime family has been charged with setting up a "bogus" company in Chatsworth to defraud other firms out of more than $1 million worth of videotape and equipment, most of which was distributed to Los Angeles-area pornography producers. Martin Taccetta, 38, of Florham Park, N.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1989 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writers
A man authorities describe as a New Jersey leader of an organized crime family has been charged with setting up a "bogus" company in Chatsworth to defraud other firms out of more than $1 million worth of videotape and equipment, most of which was distributed to Los Angeles-area pornography producers. Martin Taccetta, 38, of Florham Park, N.J.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Two jurors in the trial of 20 people acquitted on all charges of being mobsters say the judge's instructions were misunderstood and led the panel to mistakenly find the defendants not guilty on some of the counts. Helen Bove said she and some other jurors did not say anything when the verdict was read Friday because they expected federal prosecutors to ask for a poll of the jury. Polling the jury is a common practice that can prompt the judge to order further deliberations or declare a mistrial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000
Anthony Corallo, 87, the former boss of the Lucchese crime family in New York who was serving a life sentence for racketeering. Known as "Tony Ducks" for his longtime ability to dodge government subpoenas and convictions, Corallo headed the Lucchese family through much of the 1970s and '80s. His reign was marked by an interest in labor racketeering, focusing on private trash-hauling and on big construction projects in Manhattan.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
A federal jury in Newark, N.J., retired for the night after its first day of deliberating the fate of 20 reputed members of the Lucchese organized crime family in what is believed to be the nation's longest federal criminal trial. The jury in the 21-month-old trial faced a vast array of materials, including more than 40,000 pages of transcripts. U.S. District Judge Harold A. Ackerman spent Wednesday reading instructions to the jury, which must decide 77 charges.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Two former police detectives accused of moonlighting as killers for the Mafia walked free on $5 million bail each Thursday as a defense lawyer said he would seek dismissal of the charges. Prosecutors allege that former partners Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa lived double lives at hit men for the mob, gunning down, kidnapping and tracking rivals of a Lucchese family underboss for tens of thousands of dollars.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2005 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As misting rain fell in the late afternoon, Anthony Dilapi strolled into the darkened, underground garage of his Hollywood apartment. Suddenly a masked gunman rushed toward him and fired. Five bullets to the face. Four to the body. The killer jumped into a waiting car and raced away. His victim died instantly. The Feb. 4, 1990, shooting never made headlines. Dilapi, 53, was listed on his death certificate as a used-car salesman.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | United Press International
Three Mafia family godfathers and five underlings were sentenced today to prison terms of up to 100 years for running "The Commission" that directed murders, loan-sharking and racketeering since the days of Al Capone. U.S. District Judge Richard Owen sentenced the mobsters in a courtroom packed with press and spectators, granting the prosecution's request for stiff sentences.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Two jurors in the trial of 20 people acquitted on all charges of being mobsters say the judge's instructions were misunderstood and led the panel to mistakenly find the defendants not guilty on some of the counts. Helen Bove said she and some other jurors did not say anything when the verdict was read Friday because they expected federal prosecutors to ask for a poll of the jury. Polling the jury is a common practice that can prompt the judge to order further deliberations or declare a mistrial.
NEWS
August 27, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury in Newark on Friday acquitted 20 alleged members of the Lucchese crime family of New Jersey, dealing a major setback to federal prosecutors and ending the longest federal criminal trial in the nation's history. After deliberating for only 14 hours, the jury announced verdicts of not guilty to 77 counts related to alleged loan-sharking, gambling, drug dealing and fraudulent credit card operations spanning a 10-year period.
NEWS
September 9, 1986 | Associated Press
Brushing aside defense complaints of ill health, double jeopardy and pretrial publicity, a federal judge began picking an anonymous jury Monday for the trial of eight men accused of participating in the Mafia's ruling commission. Among the questions potential jurors were asked was whether they had ever heard of Al Capone, the notorious Chicago mob boss.
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