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Lucien Bouchard

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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec isn't a country, and most people want it to stay that way. Melanie Dore certainly does. She was born in the 1970s, when the separatist movement was at its peak of passion, and the topic today seems awfully outdated and terribly tiresome. Yet when she votes for a new provincial premier Nov. 30, there is a good chance that she will vote for the incumbent, Lucien Bouchard, an avowed separatist, rather than Jean Charest, who has made abandoning the idea the centerpiece of his campaign.
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NEWS
January 12, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard resigned Thursday, saying that he has failed to lead his French-speaking province to independence from Canada and that it is time for someone else to lead the separatist cause. "I regret one thing--not having done better and more," he said in an emotional speech in the province's legislature in Quebec City. "I recognize that my efforts to revive the debate were in vain."
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NEWS
November 10, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the way it played on the evening news here, one might assume the fate of Canada rests with a 36-year-old American from Orange County who now lives in Montreal. At least, that was how anchorman Peter Mansbridge, tongue slightly in cheek, framed the story naming Audrey Best as the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s "newsmaker of the week" last Friday. Best is married to Lucien Bouchard, 56, the politician who led Quebec separatists tantalizingly close to their goal of independence from Canada in the province's Oct. 30 referendum.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec isn't a country, and most people want it to stay that way. Melanie Dore certainly does. She was born in the 1970s, when the separatist movement was at its peak of passion, and the topic today seems awfully outdated and terribly tiresome. Yet when she votes for a new provincial premier Nov. 30, there is a good chance that she will vote for the incumbent, Lucien Bouchard, an avowed separatist, rather than Jean Charest, who has made abandoning the idea the centerpiece of his campaign.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an oak-paneled parliamentary office once occupied by the country's World War II prime minister, surrounded by a well-thumbed library and photos of his family, Lucien Bouchard plots the dismemberment of Canada. It is all very democratic, if sometimes a trifle impolite. Bouchard arrived here in November with the anomalous title of Leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition, earned by the startling electoral success of the Quebec separatist party that he founded, the Bloc Quebecois.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Lucien Bouchard seems the unconventional politician, then Audrey Best Bouchard is the equally unconventional political wife. Born in France on the Cote d'Azur to a French mother and American father and raised a "Navy brat" in Los Alamitos, she holds both U.S. and French passports, but not Canadian citizenship. This means she can't vote for her husband.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Quebec's pro-independence government was reelected Monday but won only 43% of the popular vote, probably dampening its zest for holding a secession referendum soon. The outcome means a new term of up to five years for Quebec's charismatic premier, Lucien Bouchard, who says he will call a referendum on independence whenever he feels the separatist side can win. But he may need to wait awhile for what he calls the "winning conditions."
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lucien Bouchard, a charismatic Quebec separatist hoping to help lead the mainly French-speaking province to independence as soon as next year, had his left leg amputated Thursday after he developed an infection, possibly from the so-called flesh-eating bacteria. Bouchard, 55, was reported in serious but stable condition in intensive care at Saint Luc Hospital in Montreal. He entered the hospital Tuesday for treatment of phlebitis.
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada is being dragged reluctantly into a new confrontation over the future of French-speaking Quebec. In the last two weeks, political leaders and commentators across Canada have lobbed rhetorical grenades at each other over the revived prospect of Quebec independence. Two factors have pushed Quebec back to the top of the national political agenda. First is the pending provincial election there, which by law must take place by fall.
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada stands on the edge of unknown territory as Quebec's voters decide today whether to endorse breaking away from the rest of the country. Campaign leaders on both sides--Prime Minister Jean Chretien for the forces of national unity and opposition party leader Lucien Bouchard for the separatists--strived Sunday to fire the emotions of voters in the French-speaking province.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a quarter of a century, Quebec delegations have worked as sort of shadow embassies and consulates to their Canadian counterparts. They have served to remind the world of Quebec's distinct place as the center of French language and culture in North America, to promote trade and investment, and, when a separatist government is in power in Quebec City as it is now, they tout the province's aspirations toward independence from the rest of Canada.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Separatist leader Lucien Bouchard was sworn in as premier of Quebec on Monday, vowing to lead the French-speaking province to independence from Canada after first bringing it financial stability.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | BARBARA BORST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Quebec separatist movement received a boost Tuesday when charismatic leader Lucien Bouchard declared his candidacy for premier of the French-speaking Canadian province. Virtually all other leading candidates for the post have already said they will step aside for Bouchard. He is expected to assume the job in mid-January, after first being acclaimed leader of the ruling Parti Quebecois and winning election to the provincial Parliament in a district surrounding the town where he grew up.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the way it played on the evening news here, one might assume the fate of Canada rests with a 36-year-old American from Orange County who now lives in Montreal. At least, that was how anchorman Peter Mansbridge, tongue slightly in cheek, framed the story naming Audrey Best as the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s "newsmaker of the week" last Friday. Best is married to Lucien Bouchard, 56, the politician who led Quebec separatists tantalizingly close to their goal of independence from Canada in the province's Oct. 30 referendum.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacques Parizeau, the separatist premier of Quebec, announced his resignation Tuesday, less than 24 hours after his forces fell just short of winning the right to take the French- speaking province out of Canada. Parizeau, 65, denied that his decision was influenced by the avalanche of criticism that struck him for a speech he made after the ballots were counted, in which he blamed "money and the ethnic vote" for thwarting the nationalist ambitions of French-descended Quebeckers.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The narrow defeat suffered by Quebec's separatists in Monday's referendum means that the ongoing threat of separation, poised over Canada like a guillotine, will continue to influence every major national political and economic decision in the foreseeable future. Each will be measured at least in part, if not first and foremost, for its potential impact on Quebec's mercurial voters.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading Quebec separatist in Canada's Parliament said he will make a low-key, earnest presentation of the case for Quebec independence, unfiltered by possible "distortions" of the Canadian government, when he meets President Clinton this week in Ottawa. "This is the first direct sighting of a separatist by a President, so I will try to . . . speak . . . very frankly about why there are separatists in Quebec, what they are trying to achieve . . .
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quebec voters rejected a proposal to secede from Canada by the narrowest of margins Monday, barely averting an unprecedented constitutional crisis for America's northern neighbor and largest trading partner. The ballot measure--which was opposed by 50.6% of voters and supported by 49.4%--would have empowered the Quebec government to declare the French-speaking province of 7.
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