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Lucile Yaney

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BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Maybe it's an omen. Since June 13, the Inn of the Seventh Ray, the ethereal Topanga Canyon eatery that should rank high on any reasonable list of the world's most California enterprises, might better be called the Inn of the Eleventh Chapter. That's right. Chapter 11 for everybody's favorite New Age restaurant. Given its lovely setting and considerable reknown, how could the inn end up in bankruptcy court? Was it some inauspicious alignment of the planets? The solar eclipse? A cloudy aura? Nah.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993 | As told to Times staff writer MARIA L. La GANGA
Lucile Yaney is pure Topanga, a singular soul of equal parts faith, grit and whimsy. When the fire threatened her home and restaurant--the landmark Inn of the Seventh Ray--she grabbed her hard drive and some family pictures from her nearby house and began what would become a days-long prayer vigil. As the fire raged, Yaney, 54, worked--clearing brush and feeding firefighters stir-fry. She was in constant communication with "the angels," calling out for help and protection.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993 | As told to Times staff writer MARIA L. La GANGA
Lucile Yaney is pure Topanga, a singular soul of equal parts faith, grit and whimsy. When the fire threatened her home and restaurant--the landmark Inn of the Seventh Ray--she grabbed her hard drive and some family pictures from her nearby house and began what would become a days-long prayer vigil. As the fire raged, Yaney, 54, worked--clearing brush and feeding firefighters stir-fry. She was in constant communication with "the angels," calling out for help and protection.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Maybe it's an omen. Since June 13, the Inn of the Seventh Ray, the ethereal Topanga Canyon eatery that should rank high on any reasonable list of the world's most California enterprises, might better be called the Inn of the Eleventh Chapter. That's right. Chapter 11 for everybody's favorite New Age restaurant. Given its lovely setting and considerable reknown, how could the inn end up in bankruptcy court? Was it some inauspicious alignment of the planets? The solar eclipse? A cloudy aura? Nah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending a three-week nightmare of early morning commuting for Topanga residents, Topanga Canyon Boulevard reopens to 24-hour through traffic tonight. The road has been closed to residents for nearly eight hours daily--from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.--the time allotted for construction crews to work on $2-million worth of repairs necessary because of damage from the Jan. 10 rainstorm.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
In a wide-open grass field surrounded by trees, a majestic mountain range and the silhouette of horses crossing the top of that range, strangers walk past each other, exchanging "hellos" on a recent Saturday afternoon in Topanga Canyon. It's easy to forget that you can stumble upon these casual, low-key moments in our sprawling metropolis, most of them played out in the nooks and crannies created by the region's canyons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
When it's open, it unites the Valley with the sea. When it's closed, it splits Topanga Canyon right down the middle. That's the effect that partially severed Topanga Canyon Boulevard is having on residents of the mountain hamlet between the San Fernando Valley and Malibu. An 80-foot washout has forced the off-again, on-again closure of the heavily used route since Jan. 10. And now state highway officials say a 17-hour-per-day shutdown will likely continue through the end of March.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | LESLIE BERGER and CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Flames singed the edges of its hot tubs and lapped at its front door, but this canyon known for bohemianism was alive and well Thursday, returning to normal with the same New Age cool and old-fashioned pluck that helped it beat the odds and a major fire once more.
NEWS
January 29, 1998 | HECTOR TOBAR and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fear and loathing have descended upon the restaurant trade in Los Angeles County as the county Health Services Department launches an unprecedented crackdown, closing eateries for code violations at three times the usual rate. And, for the first time, the health department has begun issuing letter grades that restaurants must post in their front windows. Soon, customers will be able to know whether their favorite bistro or deli has earned an A, B or C--or lower.
FOOD
December 16, 1990 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What would you serve in place of ham or turkey or roast if, this year, you were going vegetarian? The Times asked several chefs from restaurants that serve vegetarian food to help us out with an entree from their menu.
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