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Lucille Ball

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a crowded ceremony Monday on what would have been Lucille Ball's 90th birthday, the honorary mayor of Hollywood and representatives of the U.S. Postal Service unveiled a first-class stamp with the comic actress' image. It's less the wacky Lucy and more the glam Lucy--the arched thin eyebrows, chandelier earrings, and red lips pursed seductively. You could buy the 34-cent stamp Monday in Los Angeles. Starting today, some 110 million of them are available at post offices across the country.
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NEWS
August 25, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Jane Croft Lewis, an actress best remembered as the perennial comedy sidekick of Lucille Ball in two of the late redhead's long-running television series, has died. She was 83. Lewis died Tuesday of natural causes at her home in Century City, said a friend, Madelyn Pugh Davis, the co-creator and writer of "I Love Lucy."
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Morton, stand-up comedian and producer for the post-"I Love Lucy" television shows starring his late wife, Lucille Ball, has died. He was 74. Morton, who was married to the legendary red-haired comedian for nearly 28 years, died of lung cancer Tuesday in Palm Springs, Variety columnist and longtime friend Army Archerd reported Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
Roy Rowan, 78, a radio and television announcer who introduced all of the Lucille Ball shows. Born in Paw Paw, Mich., Rowan attended Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo and began his announcing career at radio station WKZO there, working with Ralph Story, Paul Harvey and Harry Carry. Rowan moved on to radio stations in Schenectady and Buffalo, N.Y., and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles to work for CBS Radio and later CBS Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997
Why would Mike Boehm wax rapturously over Gwen Stefani's looks and ignore her talent (Mixed Media, Nov. 23)? Could it be because Stefani has no talent? She is a cliche of her generation: afraid not to be anorexic lest she be unable to wear those trashy navel-baring tops, and a basically nasal, untrained, terrible singer. And to compare her to Lucille Ball? Wait! Oh gosh, what's that rumbling I feel? A 5.0 earthquake? No, it's Miss Ball rolling over in her grave, no doubt. CHERYL V. SHERMAN Granada Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1997 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The James Stewart we know and love on screen is earnest, brave, impossibly good. But Mr. Squeaky Clean doesn't have a perfect record, which explains why "After the Thin Man" (1936) is one of three films in the Orange County Museum of Art's "Mis-Cast Stars" series, opening Friday. "We all seem to get used to seeing certain stars in very specific ways, [but] often their careers were much broader than that," said Arthur Taussig, adjunct curator of film for the museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Pat Collins, the "hip hypnotist" who introduced the therapeutic tool to a generation of Hollywood celebrities and television audiences, died at her home Saturday, her daughter said. Collins was 62. She had been in ill health for several years after a stroke, said Maelene Grenat of Lafayette, Ind. Collins once hypnotized Lucille Ball on a segment of the "I Love Lucy" comedy series. She counted Ball, Robert Wagner, Ed Begley Sr. and other stars among her close friends and Olympic skater Dorothy Hamill as a student, her daughter said.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 1997 | Steven Stark, This article is adapted from "Glued to the Set: The 60 Television Shows and Events that Made Us Who We Are Today," published this month by The Free Press. Author Steven Stark is a commentator for National Public Radio and has written extensively for the Atlantic Monthly and other publications
This spring marks the 40th anniversary of the production of the last episode of "I Love Lucy." It is an occasion worth noting. The contributions of this show to television history are legendary: First sitcom to be a hit. First show to be No. 1 three years in a row. First show to be filmed live before a studio audience. In fact, calling "I Love Lucy" the most popular television show of all time is hardly an overstatement.
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