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Lucille Roybal Allard

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NEWS
March 12, 1987
Gov. George Deukmejian set July 7 for a special election in the Eastside's 56th Assembly District to replace former Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (D-Los Angeles), who resigned after she was elected to the Los Angeles City Council. Molina and other Latino elected officials reportedly have agreed to support as her replacement Lucille Roybal Allard, the daughter of senior Latino legislator Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles).
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NATIONAL
November 23, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Lucille Roybal-Allard has taken up an unlikely cause for a congresswoman from Los Angeles' landlocked Eastside: catfish. She is among the leaders of an effort to reel in a new federal catfish inspection program that she says threatens to cost jobs in her district and ignite a trade war with Vietnam, an important trading partner with California. Seafood is currently inspected by the Food and Drug Administration, but Congress agreed to subject catfish to a more rigorous inspection regimen, conducted by the Department of Agriculture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1992
Despite the urgings of others, state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) said Wednesday that he will not run for an East Side congressional seat created under a reapportionment plan created by the state Supreme Court. The decision by Torres, 45, avoids a potentially divisive fight with Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who has declared her candidacy for the newly created 33rd Congressional District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 4% of votes cast in the congressional district of Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) went uncounted in the 2000 election, according to a study commissioned by 18 members of Congress. The voting disparities in the Los Angeles district, which includes downtown, East Los Angeles and other poor communities, mirrored those of similar districts nationwide among those in the 40-district survey.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshman Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) is considered a heavy favorite to recapture the 33rd Congressional District seat she won two years ago. Roybal faces only one challenger in the primary, a political newcomer making his first bid for elective office, and there are no Republican candidates. Roybal-Allard, 52, succeeded her father, Edward R. Roybal, who represented the 33rd District for nearly 30 years before his retirement in 1992.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Faced again with opposition from a key lawmaker, State Bar leaders on Friday set aside a compromise proposal for a landmark ethical rule restricting sexual conduct between lawyers and their clients. Instead, a Bar Board of Governors committee voted to begin direct negotiations to fashion an agreement with state Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who is seeking an outright ban on such relationships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 4% of votes cast in the congressional district of Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) went uncounted in the 2000 election, according to a study commissioned by 18 members of Congress. The voting disparities in the Los Angeles district, which includes downtown, East Los Angeles and other poor communities, mirrored those of similar districts nationwide among those in the 40-district survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
In a first step toward putting behind them some of the recent election bitterness, Los Angeles City Councilwoman-elect Gloria Molina and other Latino elected officials who opposed her have agreed on the person they will support to replace Molina when she officially gives up her Assembly seat on Friday. The candidate is Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of senior Latino legislator Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles).
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Lucille Roybal Allard, the 45-year-old daughter of longtime Rep. Edward R. Roybal, said she has "probably been referred to as the congressman's daughter more in recent times than when I was a kid." Having won 5,443 votes, or 62% of the total, to capture the 56th Assembly District seat Tuesday on the heavily Latino Eastside, Allard said that high on her list of priorities is to show that she is "my own person."
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of longtime Democratic Rep. Edward R. Roybal, easily followed in her father's political footsteps Tuesday by winning a special election for the Assembly in the Eastside by a wide margin. Complete unofficial returns showed Allard had 62% of the votes cast, enough for her to win outright the 56th Assembly District seat that Gloria Molina gave up to run successfully for the Los Angeles City Council. Allard's closest challenger was Commerce City Councilman James B.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freshman Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) is considered a heavy favorite to recapture the 33rd Congressional District seat she won two years ago. Roybal faces only one challenger in the primary, a political newcomer making his first bid for elective office, and there are no Republican candidates. Roybal-Allard, 52, succeeded her father, Edward R. Roybal, who represented the 33rd District for nearly 30 years before his retirement in 1992.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After more than a decade of being divided among representatives, much of the Southeast area now has one voice in Congress--Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who wants to tap Washington's vast resources to benefit her predominantly Latino constituents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1992
Despite the urgings of others, state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) said Wednesday that he will not run for an East Side congressional seat created under a reapportionment plan created by the state Supreme Court. The decision by Torres, 45, avoids a potentially divisive fight with Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who has declared her candidacy for the newly created 33rd Congressional District.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Faced again with opposition from a key lawmaker, State Bar leaders on Friday set aside a compromise proposal for a landmark ethical rule restricting sexual conduct between lawyers and their clients. Instead, a Bar Board of Governors committee voted to begin direct negotiations to fashion an agreement with state Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who is seeking an outright ban on such relationships.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Lucille Roybal Allard, the 45-year-old daughter of longtime Rep. Edward R. Roybal, said she has "probably been referred to as the congressman's daughter more in recent times than when I was a kid." Having won 5,443 votes, or 62% of the total, to capture the 56th Assembly District seat Tuesday on the heavily Latino Eastside, Allard said that high on her list of priorities is to show that she is "my own person."
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of longtime Democratic Rep. Edward R. Roybal, easily followed in her father's political footsteps Tuesday by winning a special election for the Assembly in the Eastside by a wide margin. Complete unofficial returns showed Allard had 62% of the votes cast, enough for her to win outright the 56th Assembly District seat that Gloria Molina gave up to run successfully for the Los Angeles City Council. Allard's closest challenger was Commerce City Councilman James B.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After more than a decade of being divided among representatives, much of the Southeast area now has one voice in Congress--Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles), who wants to tap Washington's vast resources to benefit her predominantly Latino constituents.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Lucille Roybal-Allard has taken up an unlikely cause for a congresswoman from Los Angeles' landlocked Eastside: catfish. She is among the leaders of an effort to reel in a new federal catfish inspection program that she says threatens to cost jobs in her district and ignite a trade war with Vietnam, an important trading partner with California. Seafood is currently inspected by the Food and Drug Administration, but Congress agreed to subject catfish to a more rigorous inspection regimen, conducted by the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
March 12, 1987
Gov. George Deukmejian set July 7 for a special election in the Eastside's 56th Assembly District to replace former Assemblywoman Gloria Molina (D-Los Angeles), who resigned after she was elected to the Los Angeles City Council. Molina and other Latino elected officials reportedly have agreed to support as her replacement Lucille Roybal Allard, the daughter of senior Latino legislator Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
In a first step toward putting behind them some of the recent election bitterness, Los Angeles City Councilwoman-elect Gloria Molina and other Latino elected officials who opposed her have agreed on the person they will support to replace Molina when she officially gives up her Assembly seat on Friday. The candidate is Lucille Roybal Allard, daughter of senior Latino legislator Rep. Edward R. Roybal (D-Los Angeles).
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