Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLuckman Jazz Orchestra
IN THE NEWS

Luckman Jazz Orchestra

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011
Luckman Jazz Orchestra What: The music of Horace Silver, with Charles Owens conducting When: 8 p.m. Sept. 24 Where: Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Auditorium, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles Tickets: $35 to $45 Information: (323) 343-6600 or http://www.luckmanarts.org/events
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
MUSIC With a voice equally adept at delving into the gruff roots of the blues or the most weightless melodies, Dianne Reeves is one of the most prominent jazz vocalists working today. Paired with the Luckman Jazz Orchestra, the four-time Grammy winner should come close to liftoff on multiple occasions here. The Luckman Fine Arts Complex, 5151 State University Drive, L.A. Sat., 8 p.m. $40-$65. http://www.luckmanarts.org .
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
MUSIC With a voice equally adept at delving into the gruff roots of the blues or the most weightless melodies, Dianne Reeves is one of the most prominent jazz vocalists working today. Paired with the Luckman Jazz Orchestra, the four-time Grammy winner should come close to liftoff on multiple occasions here. The Luckman Fine Arts Complex, 5151 State University Drive, L.A. Sat., 8 p.m. $40-$65. http://www.luckmanarts.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011
Luckman Jazz Orchestra What: The music of Horace Silver, with Charles Owens conducting When: 8 p.m. Sept. 24 Where: Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Auditorium, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles Tickets: $35 to $45 Information: (323) 343-6600 or http://www.luckmanarts.org/events
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Luckman Jazz Orchestra took another important step Saturday night in a continuing journey aimed at establishing the ensemble as an innovative jazz entity. Led by veteran composer-flutist-educator James Newton, the orchestra--filled with some of the Southland's most gifted players--offered a program bursting at the seams with compelling new looks at works by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, Charles Mingus and Newton himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How important is the big band to jazz? The answer came bursting off the stage Saturday night at Cal State Los Angeles. The Luckman Jazz Orchestra, conducted by James Newton, making its debut with a program that embraced everything from Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus to Gil Evans, almost instantly defined why the music of large ensembles is so irresistible. The big band is the symphony orchestra of jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Luckman Jazz Orchestra did what it does best Saturday night: vividly display the galvanizing excitement of big band jazz. In existence for less than two years, operating on a modest budget, the ensemble -- conducted and inspired by James Newton -- is already one of the country's finest musical organizations. Saturday's program in the acoustically accurate surroundings of the Luckman Performing Arts Complex was titled "Jazz Impressionism -- Dances, Blues & Ballads."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Newton, tall and prepossessing on the podium, raises his arms, condor-like, then brings them down to his sides in a sudden, sweeping motion. The Luckman Jazz Orchestra, positioned before him in a wide arc, responds with a thunderous chord. Newton lifts his arms again, waving two fingers on his right hand, then moves them in semicircles, his body waving slightly with the motion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be time for UCLA to post a "caveat emptor" sign whenever there is a jazz concert at Royce Hall. Buyer beware, that is, for anyone expecting Royce's audio engineers to allow an accurate sound image of what really takes place on stage when a jazz ensemble is performing. In less than a month, two superb jazz orchestras have had their performances distorted by sound mixes appropriate for rock music but completely wrong for jazz. On Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The holiday season arrived early Saturday night at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex with the presentation of a lovely Christmas gift: the Duke Ellington/Billy Strayhorn arrangement of Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker Suite," performed by the Luckman Jazz Orchestra. Transforming a classic orchestral work -- especially one so well-known -- took discerning eyes and imaginative musicality. Both are qualities inherent to the Ellington/Strayhorn partnership.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Greg Burk, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Saxist Charles Owens is going blue for the senior citizens. Blue notes, blue humor. "A dirty mind is a good thing at any age," chuckled Owens, introducing a breezy R&B hip-shaker called "Funk It" at a daytime retirement-community performance in downtown Los Angeles sponsored by the Angeles Plaza Entertainment Committee. "We ain't dead yet!" Owens, 74, means to include jazz itself among the unentombed. The seniors quit text-messaging to clap rhythm in agreement, and Owens' all-ages quintet proceeded to augment standards such as "Misty" and "Take the 'A' Train" with perky Latin grooves and gutty blues, all featuring his own challenging tenor runs and atomized tones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2008
1. REBIRTH OF THE COOL: It might not have the visibility -- or the performance schedule -- of Wynton Marsalis' Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra. But in terms of soloists, creative arrangements and the sheer ability to swing, the Luckman Jazz Orchestra is second to nobody's ensemble. The always stimulating music of Miles Davis (above) is on the menu for this rare appearance by the orchestra, conducted by the versatile saxophonist Charles Owens. 8 p.m. Sat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There's a jazz enigma in Los Angeles. Actually, it's one of several -- like why an area overflowing with world-class talent has not yet initiated a program remotely comparable to New York City's Jazz at Lincoln Center. But this particular conundrum is called the Luckman Jazz Orchestra. And it is -- sometimes in actuality, sometimes in potential -- as good a large jazz ensemble as there is, anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The holiday season arrived early Saturday night at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex with the presentation of a lovely Christmas gift: the Duke Ellington/Billy Strayhorn arrangement of Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker Suite," performed by the Luckman Jazz Orchestra. Transforming a classic orchestral work -- especially one so well-known -- took discerning eyes and imaginative musicality. Both are qualities inherent to the Ellington/Strayhorn partnership.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Luckman Jazz Orchestra did what it does best Saturday night: vividly display the galvanizing excitement of big band jazz. In existence for less than two years, operating on a modest budget, the ensemble -- conducted and inspired by James Newton -- is already one of the country's finest musical organizations. Saturday's program in the acoustically accurate surroundings of the Luckman Performing Arts Complex was titled "Jazz Impressionism -- Dances, Blues & Ballads."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Newton, tall and prepossessing on the podium, raises his arms, condor-like, then brings them down to his sides in a sudden, sweeping motion. The Luckman Jazz Orchestra, positioned before him in a wide arc, responds with a thunderous chord. Newton lifts his arms again, waving two fingers on his right hand, then moves them in semicircles, his body waving slightly with the motion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There's a jazz enigma in Los Angeles. Actually, it's one of several -- like why an area overflowing with world-class talent has not yet initiated a program remotely comparable to New York City's Jazz at Lincoln Center. But this particular conundrum is called the Luckman Jazz Orchestra. And it is -- sometimes in actuality, sometimes in potential -- as good a large jazz ensemble as there is, anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every time the Luckman Jazz Orchestra offers one of its far too rare performances, the first question that comes to mind is why this fine ensemble doesn't have a much longer performance schedule. Granted, costs can be high for appearances by a 16-piece musical organization, but it's hard to believe that in a community as economically viable and as culturally aware as Los Angeles that funding--and/or sponsor support--can't be found for a rainbow aggregation of superb jazz artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be time for UCLA to post a "caveat emptor" sign whenever there is a jazz concert at Royce Hall. Buyer beware, that is, for anyone expecting Royce's audio engineers to allow an accurate sound image of what really takes place on stage when a jazz ensemble is performing. In less than a month, two superb jazz orchestras have had their performances distorted by sound mixes appropriate for rock music but completely wrong for jazz. On Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every time the Luckman Jazz Orchestra offers one of its far too rare performances, the first question that comes to mind is why this fine ensemble doesn't have a much longer performance schedule. Granted, costs can be high for appearances by a 16-piece musical organization, but it's hard to believe that in a community as economically viable and as culturally aware as Los Angeles that funding--and/or sponsor support--can't be found for a rainbow aggregation of superb jazz artists.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|