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Lucky Peterson

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been 20 years since Lucky Peterson scored his first and only hit. The fact is, he can't even remember much about it. But this is no hard-luck story of an old veteran trying to come back from a fog to recapture his fleeting moment of glory. When Peterson's song, "1-2-3-4," peaked at No. 40 on the Billboard R & B charts in 1971, the artist was 6 years old.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you happened to be driving on Placentia Avenue Saturday night and saw a man running down the street screaming and playing an electric guitar, don't be concerned. It was just Lucky Peterson. In the middle of his first set at the Newport Roadhouse, the 26-year-old bluesman came off the bandstand to sing and solo through a blistering minor-key version of Howlin' Wolf's "Little Red Rooster."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you happened to be driving on Placentia Avenue Saturday night and saw a man running down the street screaming and playing an electric guitar, don't be concerned. It was just Lucky Peterson. In the middle of his first set at the Newport Roadhouse, the 26-year-old bluesman came off the bandstand to sing and solo through a blistering minor-key version of Howlin' Wolf's "Little Red Rooster."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been 20 years since Lucky Peterson scored his first and only hit. The fact is, he can't even remember much about it. But this is no hard-luck story of an old veteran trying to come back from a fog to recapture his fleeting moment of glory. When Peterson's song, "1-2-3-4," peaked at No. 40 on the Billboard R & B charts in 1971, the artist was 6 years old.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998
What's happening in the coming weeks: * Texas guitarist Jimmie Vaughan, right, (formerly of the Fabulous Thunderbirds) headlines the first-ever San Diego Blues Festival on May 16. Other performers include Rod Piazza & the Mighty Flyers, Lucky Peterson, the King Brothers, Billy Thompson and Taryn Donath. Embarcadero waterfront, downtown. $15 in advance or $20 at the gate. (619) 220-TIXS. * At the Old Globe Theatre May 28-June 28: "Tintypes."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a girl growing up in Chicago, Mavis Staples was so enthralled by Mahalia Jackson's singing that her father had to warn her to keep out of his collection of the great gospel singer's albums while he was away at work. "He didn't want me to break his records. He would come home and I would ask him: 'Daddy, would you play some Miss Mahalia Jackson?'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1999 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mavis Staples singing the gospel catalog of her mentor Mahalia Jackson may be as artful and expressive as music gets, and something unquestionably worthy of gracing concert halls typically attuned to classical music. Such austere settings aren't exactly worthy of the music, however, robbing it of the essential immediacy that springs from the unfettered interaction between performer and audience in church.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Willie Dixon left Chicago for the sunnier climates of Glendale at the beginning of the '80s with big plans for the blues. By then, of course, the man was already a legendary songwriter and performer who was instrumental in creating modern blues music at Chess Records. His songs were recorded there by Muddy Waters ("I Just Want to Make Love to You"), Howlin' Wolf ("Back Door Man"), Little Walter ("My Babe"), Bo Diddley ("Pretty Thing") and many other key blues men.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2007 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
In an era of do-it-yourself retirement planning, workers are often hobbled by a lack of clear information on their investments and the fees they are charged to manage them. Those fees can eat away tens of thousands of dollars over time. Now, amid mounting evidence that murky accounting could undermine the financial security of retirees, federal regulators are seeking to toughen disclosure rules and devise a single standard for a wide variety of investments and retirement plans.
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