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Lucy Dunn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County property executive who spent 25 years managing plans to develop a swath of coastal wetlands in Huntington Beach has been named by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as his director of housing and community development. Lucy Dunn, 51, has been the public face of plans to build on the Bolsa Chica wetlands, a controversial proposal that once encompassed 1,200 acres, with a marina, hotels and up to 5,700 homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County property executive who spent 25 years managing plans to develop a swath of coastal wetlands in Huntington Beach has been named by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as his director of housing and community development. Lucy Dunn, 51, has been the public face of plans to build on the Bolsa Chica wetlands, a controversial proposal that once encompassed 1,200 acres, with a marina, hotels and up to 5,700 homes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
Additional soil samples tested last month confirmed cancer-causing chemicals exist on property south of the Bolsa Chica mesa, but in an area smaller than previously thought, an official for the property owner said. The "hot" spot is limited to a section where Graham Street dead-ends near the 42-acre Fieldstone property, said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of Hearthside Homes, which owns the land. The substance involved is polychlorinated biphenyls, Dunn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2000
Re "Bolsa Chica Project Slashed Again" (Jan. 14): Good for the California Coastal Commission for showing some backbone. Now the state of California [should] use some of its (our) budget surplus to simply buy up coastal wetlands and undeveloped property. Most of the wetlands in Huntington Beach were destroyed decades ago--my 30-year-old home sits on a filled marsh almost five miles from the ocean. Our population will continue to explode through the next century, but the coast is a finite ecological and recreational resource our children should inherit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2000
Re "Bolsa Chica Project Slashed Again" (Jan. 14): Good for the California Coastal Commission for showing some backbone. Now the state of California [should] use some of its (our) budget surplus to simply buy up coastal wetlands and undeveloped property. Most of the wetlands in Huntington Beach were destroyed decades ago--my 30-year-old home sits on a filled marsh almost five miles from the ocean. Our population will continue to explode through the next century, but the coast is a finite ecological and recreational resource our children should inherit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994
In this new age of conservation, it is exciting to see developers opting to preserve natural habitats such as the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Why are people, including the County of Orange with its alternative plan, trying to impede Koll Real Estate Group's efforts to restore and protect our wetlands? I would not classify myself as a hard-core environmentalist, but I do know a good deal when I see one. The landowner is offering full funding to restore the wetlands, provide diversified housing and create much needed jobs and revenue for our community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
The idea of swapping excess federal land for the Bolsa Chica mesa is an exciting one that the Bolsa Chica Land Trust has been working on for several years. I was very pleased to see supervisorial candidate Dave Sullivan has made a specific proposal that land at El Toro be used as part of a swap (June 6). The beauty of a swap is that very little money would be needed compared to buying the land outright. Lucy Dunn of California Coastal Communities Inc. was mistaken in her claim that her company has development approvals for the mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1996
We strongly object to the unsubstantiated conclusion in your recent article on Bolsa Chica that Koll Real Estate Group is "giving up" on its approved Bolsa Chica plan. ("Koll to Offer Bolsa Chica for Sale to State," March 30.) This assertion is totally incorrect. The fact is that we remain committed to moving forward with the federal permit-approval process for the wetlands restoration and residential development on the lowland portion of the property. With the advent of the state's interest in acquiring the lowland, restoration of the degraded Bolsa Chica wetlands could occur through one of two ways: by implementing the Bolsa Chica plan approved by the County of Orange and California Coastal Commission (which includes a privately funded, 1,100-acre wetlands restoration in conjunction with construction of single-family homes on 185 acres of the lowland)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2002
Residents who live within a mile of a Bolsa Chica site contaminated by a cancer-causing agent will receive notices from the state Department of Toxic Substances Control this month. Officials have known for three years about the polychlorinated biphenyl, or PCB, contamination on 11/2 acres of unincorporated county land owned by Signal Landmark near the end of Graham Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
The Orange County Planning Commission on Wednesday approved the development agreement for the 3,300-home Bolsa Chica project, despite a plea by the city to postpone action. "The city of Huntington Beach is disappointed. . . . There are still significant (fiscal) issues outstanding," Mayor Victor Leipzig said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
Additional soil samples tested last month confirmed cancer-causing chemicals exist on property south of the Bolsa Chica mesa, but in an area smaller than previously thought, an official for the property owner said. The "hot" spot is limited to a section where Graham Street dead-ends near the 42-acre Fieldstone property, said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of Hearthside Homes, which owns the land. The substance involved is polychlorinated biphenyls, Dunn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
The idea of swapping excess federal land for the Bolsa Chica mesa is an exciting one that the Bolsa Chica Land Trust has been working on for several years. I was very pleased to see supervisorial candidate Dave Sullivan has made a specific proposal that land at El Toro be used as part of a swap (June 6). The beauty of a swap is that very little money would be needed compared to buying the land outright. Lucy Dunn of California Coastal Communities Inc. was mistaken in her claim that her company has development approvals for the mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1996
We strongly object to the unsubstantiated conclusion in your recent article on Bolsa Chica that Koll Real Estate Group is "giving up" on its approved Bolsa Chica plan. ("Koll to Offer Bolsa Chica for Sale to State," March 30.) This assertion is totally incorrect. The fact is that we remain committed to moving forward with the federal permit-approval process for the wetlands restoration and residential development on the lowland portion of the property. With the advent of the state's interest in acquiring the lowland, restoration of the degraded Bolsa Chica wetlands could occur through one of two ways: by implementing the Bolsa Chica plan approved by the County of Orange and California Coastal Commission (which includes a privately funded, 1,100-acre wetlands restoration in conjunction with construction of single-family homes on 185 acres of the lowland)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994
In this new age of conservation, it is exciting to see developers opting to preserve natural habitats such as the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Why are people, including the County of Orange with its alternative plan, trying to impede Koll Real Estate Group's efforts to restore and protect our wetlands? I would not classify myself as a hard-core environmentalist, but I do know a good deal when I see one. The landowner is offering full funding to restore the wetlands, provide diversified housing and create much needed jobs and revenue for our community.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Capping nearly 30 years of bitter controversy, the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved a scaled-down development plan for the bluffs above the Bolsa Chica wetlands, one of the last and largest open coastal areas in Southern California. The plan, fought over for decades in the courts and before government agencies, allows 1,235 homes on the mesa behind the Bolsa Chica wetlands near Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001
A San Diego Superior Court judge reversed her earlier ruling and Friday reinstated much of a Bolsa Chica mesa developer's lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission. "We're pleased with the judge's ruling," said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of developer Hearthside Homes. Hearthside and landowner Signal Landmark, a sister company, sued the commission over a November decision that restricted development to 1,235 homes on the upper portion of a 230-acre two-tier mesa.
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