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Lucy Jones

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1998 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lucy Jones comes from a thoroughly seismological family. Not only has she been an earthquake expert for nearly 20 years, but her husband, Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson, is a highly respected one as well. Even her young children have been by her side during some noted public earthquake briefings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
A television broadcast captured Mexico City's early earthquake warning system working successfully Friday, giving TV viewers in the capital more than a minute of warning before major shaking from a magnitude 7.2 earthquake rumbled into the city. California still lacks an early quake warning system as state and federal lawmakers haven't agreed to pay for the $16 million-a-year system.  The Mexican warning system could be seen on television (video below), when news announcer Eduardo Salazar calmly tells viewers that at 9:27 a.m. a seismic alert went off, triggering a shrieking whine on the broadcast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2011 | By Mike Anton and Shan Li, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
A tsunami from the devastating Japan earthquake hit the coast of California on Friday morning, causing significant damage in Crescent City, Santa Cruz and other parts of Northern California. There were no reports of major damage or flooding in Southern California. Crescent City, site of a deadly tsunami four decades ago, appears to be particularly hard hit. Photos: Scenes from the earthquake Local residents reported that about three dozen boats were "crushed" in the harbor and that surging waters significantly damaged or destroyed most of the docks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Victoria Kim
More than 100 aftershocks have been reported since a magnitude 5.1 earthquake rattled Southern California on Friday night. Most of the aftershocks have been small, but some were strong enough to be felt in the areas around the epicenter in northwestern Orange County. Meanwhile, officials surveyed the damage, which for the most part was considered minor. Fullerton police said early Saturday that as many as 50 people had been displaced by the quake. Several buildings are being investigated for possible structural damage, including some apartment buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jason Wells and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles' top earthquake expert is praising two TV anchors who have become the butt of some jokes for diving under their desk when Monday's 4.4 earthquake hit.  The quake occurred while the KTLA-TV Channel 5 morning news was broadcasting live in Hollywood. The anchors ducked for cover. “Earthquake, we're having an earthquake,” anchor Chris Schauble said before he and co-anchor Megan Henderson ducked underneath the desk. Twitter erupted with Schauble memes, showing his face frozen in shock.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Friday's earthquake off the eastern coast of Japan was upgraded to a magnitude 9.0 by the Japan Meteorological Agency, the Kyodo News agency reported Sunday. The agency's scientists probably had access to new data, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Susan Hough. "If they've upgraded, I expect USGS might follow suit," she said, adding that it was not unusual for magnitudes to move up or down by 0.1, because large earthquakes can be tricky to measure. "It's not surgical precision," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1996 | Scott Collins
That rumble you hear is the sound of scientists laughing. "I thought the idea of California falling into the ocean went out 20 years ago," said seismologist Lucy Jones, referring to the premise behind John Carpenter's science-fiction sequel "Escape From L.A." In the movie, a magnitude 9.6 earthquake has detached our city from the mainland, submerging the San Fernando Valley. Although the filmmakers say they've done research on temblors, there appears to be more fiction than science to the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A Russian rocket fired a tiny satellite into orbit Monday designed to test a theory that major earthquakes are preceded by low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations, possibly allowing accurate quake prediction. The 10-pound satellite, developed by the Palo Alto firm QuakeFinder, was built by Stanford University students. It will orbit about 500 miles from Earth, crossing both poles, for about six months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Victoria Kim
Authorities were tallying damage from a magnitude 5.1 earthquake that struck Southern California on Friday night. Fullerton police said early Saturday that up to 50 people had been displaced because of home damage. The quake, centered near La Habra , caused furniture to tumble, pictures to fall off walls and glass to break. Merchandise fell off store shelves, and there were reports of plate glass windows shattered. In Brea, several people suffered minor injuries during a rock slide that overturned their car. Fullerton reported seven water main breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jason Wells and Rong-Gong Lin II
The 4.4-magnitude earthquake that struck Monday near Westwood caught many early risers off guard, but for KTLA-TV Channel 5 news anchor Chris Schauble, it was the shock heard 'round the Internet. Schauble's expression and ensuing on-air duck-and-cover during the temblor took off on social media almost as quickly as the quake itself. The quake hit at 6:25 a.m., just as  Schauble and his on-air partner, Megan Henderson, were transitioning to a commercial break. But fate had other plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Irfan Khan and Paloma Esquivel
Fullerton Mayor Pro Tem Greg Sebourn was at home sitting on the couch getting his 4- and 8-year-old daughters ready for bed when the earthquake hit Friday night. “It started shaking and my youngest daughter jumped in my lap and started screaming,” he said. “We started walking toward the door when a second jolt knocked me and my daughter down.” Sebourn said he skinned his elbow and knee and his daughter bumped her head on a door jamb, but there were no serious injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Victoria Kim
Authorities were tallying damage from a magnitude 5.1 earthquake that struck Southern California on Friday night. Fullerton police said early Saturday that up to 50 people had been displaced because of home damage. The quake, centered near La Habra , caused furniture to tumble, pictures to fall off walls and glass to break. Merchandise fell off store shelves, and there were reports of plate glass windows shattered. In Brea, several people suffered minor injuries during a rock slide that overturned their car. Fullerton reported seven water main breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that hit near Westwood on Monday morning was 900 times weaker than the 6.7 Northridge earthquake in 1994 and lasted only a fraction of a second, Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson said. The Northridge quake killed 57 people and lasted up to eight seconds, Hauksson said. Monday's quake struck the northern edge of the Santa Monica Mountains, an area that has not seen much recent seismological activity.  LIVE BLOG: 4.4 earthquake strikes Los Angeles “The location is somewhat surprising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jason Wells and Rong-Gong Lin II
Los Angeles' top earthquake expert is praising two TV anchors who have become the butt of some jokes for diving under their desk when Monday's 4.4 earthquake hit.  The quake occurred while the KTLA-TV Channel 5 morning news was broadcasting live in Hollywood. The anchors ducked for cover. “Earthquake, we're having an earthquake,” anchor Chris Schauble said before he and co-anchor Megan Henderson ducked underneath the desk. Twitter erupted with Schauble memes, showing his face frozen in shock.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Rong-Gong Lin II and Matt Stevens, This post had been corrected. See note below for details
Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought. " Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don't know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we've had over the last few years, and we won't know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson. FORESHOCK? What the odds are The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood at 6:25 a.m. is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Jason Wells and Rong-Gong Lin II
The 4.4-magnitude earthquake that struck Monday near Westwood caught many early risers off guard, but for KTLA-TV Channel 5 news anchor Chris Schauble, it was the shock heard 'round the Internet. Schauble's expression and ensuing on-air duck-and-cover during the temblor took off on social media almost as quickly as the quake itself. The quake hit at 6:25 a.m., just as  Schauble and his on-air partner, Megan Henderson, were transitioning to a commercial break. But fate had other plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2002 | KENNETH REICH and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A magnitude 4.8 earthquake centered three miles northeast of Yorba Linda early Tuesday was the strongest temblor to hit the Orange County-Los Angeles metropolitan area in more than five years, scientists said. The earthquake struck at 12:08 a.m. and was strong enough to wake some residents in Orange County, the nearby Inland Empire and eastern Los Angeles County, although no major damage or injuries were reported. Scientists at Caltech and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
Earthquake scientists have received about $5 million to develop an earthquake early warning system for Southern California -- enough to build the network but not enough to operate it. The money, announced Friday, has enabled scientists to already begin purchasing 100 new sensor stations that will be deployed throughout Southern California to complete the seismic sensor network. But without funds to operate it, it's like buying a car but not having enough money for gasoline, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | STEVE LOPEZ
My thinking on earthquakes goes something like this: If Lucy Jones won't do something, I won't either. She once refused to consider buying a house that was in a fault-study zone. And here's another no-no from Earthquake Lucy. "I would not live in an unretrofitted concrete building. Those are the worst killers around the world. " But of course, thousands of people in greater Los Angeles live and work in such buildings. And despite warnings that go back decades, we are nowhere near coming up with a plan to make them safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2013 | Steve Lopez
One little boy lay on his back with a leg gash so bad that bone and tissue protruded through his skin. Firefighters carried more injured students to a triage area, where one girl had blood streaming from a head wound and another had burns across her face. The injuries at Rosemont Avenue Elementary School west of downtown Los Angeles were all fake, and part of Thursday's Great California ShakeOut earthquake preparedness drill. But the message was real: When a Big One hits Southern California, there will be casualties.
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