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Lucy Shelton

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April 30, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar
When Lucy Shelton launches into Peter Maxwell Davies' "Revelation and Fall" with the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group Monday night at the Japan America Theatre, this is (in translation) what she will sing: "I sat in silence in the deserted tavern beneath smoke-corroded beams, alone with my glass of wine; a radiant corpse, head bowed over a pool of darkness, and a dead lamb lay at my feet." "The opening is just amazing," says the soprano, a noted specialist in the music of our century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Anne LeBaron is a composer as transformer. She transforms instruments, such as putting objects on the strings of the harp to tease out hidden sounds. She transforms cultural contexts, be they Kazakh, Bach or Katrina. She deals with what we know, with issues of our time and place. But her knack is for alternative realities, showing us the here and now from a point just slightly off the beaten track. That, of course, makes it difficult to generalize about a two-part portrait of LeBaron in two concerts Saturday and Sunday at REDCAT.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Lucy Shelton remains one of our most enterprising new music sopranos, with a stack of commissions from major league 20th century composers on her shelf, ready for anything that a Boulez or a Carter or a Henze might put in front of her. Those fortunate enough to have noticed that Shelton was giving a free concert at CalArts on Saturday were rewarded with a rare live performance of Milton Babbitt's 1963 electronic cantata "Philomel."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Lucy Shelton remains one of our most enterprising new music sopranos, with a stack of commissions from major league 20th century composers on her shelf, ready for anything that a Boulez or a Carter or a Henze might put in front of her. Those fortunate enough to have noticed that Shelton was giving a free concert at CalArts on Saturday were rewarded with a rare live performance of Milton Babbitt's 1963 electronic cantata "Philomel."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Anne LeBaron is a composer as transformer. She transforms instruments, such as putting objects on the strings of the harp to tease out hidden sounds. She transforms cultural contexts, be they Kazakh, Bach or Katrina. She deals with what we know, with issues of our time and place. But her knack is for alternative realities, showing us the here and now from a point just slightly off the beaten track. That, of course, makes it difficult to generalize about a two-part portrait of LeBaron in two concerts Saturday and Sunday at REDCAT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1997
Would you choose your fun or their misery? Before you go to the circus, please consider the animals, which have been taken from their natural environment, kept in confinement and forced to do tricks they don't understand, just for your frivolous entertainment. Elephants and tigers love to run, play and interact with their own species, scratch themselves on trees, sniff around, forage for food, wallow in mud, swim and play in streams and ponds. They cannot do any of these natural, fun things when subjected to life in a circus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | WALTER PRICE
STEPHEN ALBERT: Symphony "RiverRun"; National Symphony, Mstislav Rostropovich, conducting. "To Wake the Dead" (song cycle), Lucy Shelton, soprano; 20th Century Consort, Christopher Kendall, conducting. Delos D/CD1016. Albert's 1985 Pulitzer Prize winning symphony, inspired by the works of James Joyce, is conservatively tonal, even Romantic. His style is eclectic though clearly the Stravinsky of "Firebird" and "Petrushka" have influenced him. Albert is certainly a master of lush orchestration, if his melodic material is not particularly distinguished.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1992
Composers, singers and 12 musicians will be among guest artists in the 1992-93 season beginning Sept. 17 of the Southwest Chamber Music Society, announced this week. The Society will present 18 performances of nine programs in two locations--Chapman University and Pasadena Presbyterian Church--as well as four special events in various venues through June 17 and 18, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
An animal rights activist dressed as a pink pig was arrested Saturday after she handcuffed herself to a Cadillac at the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show, police said. Lucy Shelton, a member of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, protested the alleged use of animals in General Motors Corp. crash tests. Shelton handcuffed herself to the steering wheel of a Cadillac, which was parked on a revolving platform at the show being held at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Guest artists will grace the Southwest Chamber Music Society's 1992-93 season, announced this week. The society will present nine programs in each of two locations--the Salmon Recital Hall at Chapman University in Orange and the Pasadena Presbyterian Church--and four special events at various venues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar
When Lucy Shelton launches into Peter Maxwell Davies' "Revelation and Fall" with the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group Monday night at the Japan America Theatre, this is (in translation) what she will sing: "I sat in silence in the deserted tavern beneath smoke-corroded beams, alone with my glass of wine; a radiant corpse, head bowed over a pool of darkness, and a dead lamb lay at my feet." "The opening is just amazing," says the soprano, a noted specialist in the music of our century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD
Something slightly unusual--and unusually refreshing--transpired Monday night in the Japan America Theatre, at the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group's Green Umbrella concert. The group dared to give a new music concert sans that familiar staple of such events--the world premiere. In fact, the repertory ushered in by guest conductor and contemporary music specialist Oliver Knussen took a long, measured view of the meaning of new music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A performance of Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire" remains, now almost 80 years after its composition, an event. The reasons are many, but certainly one is that the work retains its challenges for performer and listener alike: it's difficult, elusive, uncompromising music. Perhaps this partly explains the smallish gathering in attendance Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre for a UCI Chamber Music program: Audiences, nowadays at least, are famous for avoiding challenges.
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