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Luis Alberto Lacalle

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NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Luis Alberto Lacalle became president of Uruguay and promised to revive its sagging economy. Uruguay, located between inflation-ravaged Argentina and Brazil, has grown visibly poorer in the past decade. As Lacalle, a 48-year-old lawyer, took the oath of office, jubilant supporters crowded the streets of Montevideo to hail the country's first president from the Blanco Party.
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WORLD
October 26, 2009 | Associated Press
A blunt-talking former guerrilla seeking to maintain the left's hold on power in Uruguay easily got the most votes in presidential elections Sunday, but failed to win the majority needed to avoid a runoff. Jose "Pepe" Mujica received about 48% of the votes compared with 30% for former President Luis Alberto Lacalle, a free-marketeer who wants to cut government and taxes and reduce alliances with Latin American leftists. Two voter initiatives -- one to remove amnesty for human rights abuses under the 1973-85 dictatorship and another to enable mail-in votes by citizens living outside Uruguay -- also failed to win majorities, according to exit polls by the companies Cifra, Factum and Equipos Mori.
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NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most flamboyant of the new South American presidents is Argentina's Carlos Saul Menem, a lady's man with fluffy two-tone sideburns and a flair for the dramatic gesture. He has locked his estranged wife out of the official residence, sold off the government telephone network and sent two warships to help out the United States in the Persian Gulf. Patricio Aylwin of Chile is more conventional, a grandfatherly type in a gray suit, good at smoothing over rough moments.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most flamboyant of the new South American presidents is Argentina's Carlos Saul Menem, a lady's man with fluffy two-tone sideburns and a flair for the dramatic gesture. He has locked his estranged wife out of the official residence, sold off the government telephone network and sent two warships to help out the United States in the Persian Gulf. Patricio Aylwin of Chile is more conventional, a grandfatherly type in a gray suit, good at smoothing over rough moments.
WORLD
October 26, 2009 | Associated Press
A blunt-talking former guerrilla seeking to maintain the left's hold on power in Uruguay easily got the most votes in presidential elections Sunday, but failed to win the majority needed to avoid a runoff. Jose "Pepe" Mujica received about 48% of the votes compared with 30% for former President Luis Alberto Lacalle, a free-marketeer who wants to cut government and taxes and reduce alliances with Latin American leftists. Two voter initiatives -- one to remove amnesty for human rights abuses under the 1973-85 dictatorship and another to enable mail-in votes by citizens living outside Uruguay -- also failed to win majorities, according to exit polls by the companies Cifra, Factum and Equipos Mori.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush met Monday with President-elect Luis Alberto LaCalle of Uruguay and discussed debt, investment, trade and the fight against narcotics traffickers, the White House said.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
Uruguayan voters will decide Sunday whether their country should sell off government-owned enterprises, including the telephone company and the national airline, to private investors. A 1991 privatization law has met such staunch resistance from labor unions and leftist parties that President Luis Alberto Lacalle agreed to a referendum before auctioning the companies. Advocates of privatization say selling off state enterprises would improve services and help reduce Uruguay's $6.
NEWS
February 28, 1995
Former President Julio Maria Sanguinetti, 59, begins a new five-year term with his inauguration Wednesday. He will succeed President Luis Alberto Lacalle of Uruguay's Blanco Party. Sanguinetti's economic plan is not expected to bring any major departure from Lacalle's free-trade and market-oriented policies. But he has promised relief measures for Uruguayan industry and agriculture as they face foreign competition in the Mercosur free-trade zone with Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
The presidents of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay meet Friday and Saturday at this ski resort in the Argentine Andes to update their plans for a regional common market. The Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), with a combined population of nearly 200 million, is scheduled to be in full operation by January, 1995.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1991 | From Reuters
The presidents of Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay signed a blueprint Tuesday to build a gigantic common market--stretching from the Equator to Antarctica--to compete with other world trading blocs. The Southern Common Market treaty, known as Mercosur, would dismantle trade barriers and encourage cross-border investment and joint projects during the next four years. It aims to integrate neighboring nations that have been stunted by protectionism, rivalry and political instability.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Luis Alberto Lacalle became president of Uruguay and promised to revive its sagging economy. Uruguay, located between inflation-ravaged Argentina and Brazil, has grown visibly poorer in the past decade. As Lacalle, a 48-year-old lawyer, took the oath of office, jubilant supporters crowded the streets of Montevideo to hail the country's first president from the Blanco Party.
OPINION
December 2, 1990
In a tour of South America that begins today, President Bush will visit five distinctly different nations in five days. It would be unrealistic to expect anything really substantial to emerge from such a quick trip. Yet, knowing this, the leaders of every nation where Bush will stop consider it significant. And it could be the start of a more productive U.S.-South American relationship.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush called the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi an "appalling" tragedy Tuesday as U.S. officials tried to sort out the implications of India's devastating political violence on U.S. policy toward the subcontinent. "I don't know what the world's coming to, but it's a sad thing for this young man to have lost his life in this way," Bush said. "That people resort in a democratic country or anywhere to violence of this nature is just appalling." Gandhi's death comes at a time when U.S.
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