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Luis Bunuel

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1996
Two rare Luis Bunuel films will screen tonight at 8:30 p.m. at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1928), which Bunuel co-directed with Jean Epstein, and "Daughter of Deceit" (1951) will be shown as part of the school's Friday night film series "Great Directors' Films Not Available on Video." The screenings will take place at the Art Center's Ahmanson Auditorium, 1700 Lida St. Admission is free. Information: (818) 396-2200.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | Dennis Lim
Manoel de Oliveira, the director of "The Strange Case of Angelica" (out on DVD this week from Cinema Guild), is himself -- to say the least -- something of a strange case. He turns 103 this December and, having gotten his start in the age of silent cinema, has had a career trajectory unlike any other. "The Strange Case of Angelica," a critical hit at last year's Cannes Film Festival, is a film that the Portuguese director had planned to make half a century ago. Written in 1952, it would have been his second feature, but the Antonio Salazar dictatorship, which he staunchly opposed, derailed his career.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One day in Paris in 1955, during one of those charmed episodes that seem to fill the biographies of the famous, writer Andre Breton and filmmaker Luis Bunuel ran into each other on their way to visit playwright Eugene Ionesco. Bunuel had left the Surrealists years earlier but had remained friends with the fiery Breton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"Little Ashes" is a trifling historical fantasy, gossip wrapped in gossamer, beautiful to watch but it takes only a light wind to leave the story in tatters. The setting is an imaginary Madrid, circa 1922. The Catholic Church and the intellectuals are locked in a battle for the Spanish soul. At the university, ideas and emotions are roiling the lives of three friends, the esoteric is debated in bedrooms and bars over massive quantities of alcohol.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Religion, specifically the Roman Catholic Church, has often been a touchstone for Luis Bunuel. What separates Bunuel from lesser directors is his ability to face personal questions about Roman Catholicism directly, without resorting to either simple-minded reverence or snide superiority.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The American Cinematheque celebrates Halloween from Friday through Sunday at the Egyptian Theatre with "Black Cats and Haunted Castles: Classics of Japanese Horror and the Supernatural," which features a number of cult items but kicks off with some major films by big directors. The series opens Friday with a knockout double feature, Kaneto Shindo's 1968 "Kuroneko" and Shiro Toyoda's 1969 "Portrait of Hell." In the first, a horde of samurai descends upon a hut in a carefully tended field.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When he was younger, Rouben Mamoulian, who died on Friday at the age of 90, used to be annoyed that people thought he was older than he was. He had begun very young, giving acting classes in his native Tiflis, Russia, when he was only 20, directing his first play in London at 24, beginning work in the U.S. at 25, directing the drama "Porgy" (from which came "Porgy and Bess") on Broadway at 29.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | Dennis Lim
Manoel de Oliveira, the director of "The Strange Case of Angelica" (out on DVD this week from Cinema Guild), is himself -- to say the least -- something of a strange case. He turns 103 this December and, having gotten his start in the age of silent cinema, has had a career trajectory unlike any other. "The Strange Case of Angelica," a critical hit at last year's Cannes Film Festival, is a film that the Portuguese director had planned to make half a century ago. Written in 1952, it would have been his second feature, but the Antonio Salazar dictatorship, which he staunchly opposed, derailed his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
"Dali: Painting and Film" was organized by the Tate Modern in London, where it premiered this summer, but Los Angeles figures so prominently in the story it tells that its appearance at LACMA feels like something of a homecoming. It's a fascinating if not entirely persuasive exhibition whose portrayal of the artist's frustrated flirtation with the film industry is likely to find a sympathetic audience here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to increase the visibility and awareness of classic Latin American film, a group of Los Angeles-based cinephiles has launched a nonprofit organization to screen Spanish-language movies. On Wednesday, the Latin-American Cinemateca of Los Angeles will present its inaugural screening, Luis Bunuel's 1952 film "El," a brilliant look at a man's psychotic jealousy, based on the novel by Spanish author Mercedes Pinto.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
"Dali: Painting and Film" was organized by the Tate Modern in London, where it premiered this summer, but Los Angeles figures so prominently in the story it tells that its appearance at LACMA feels like something of a homecoming. It's a fascinating if not entirely persuasive exhibition whose portrayal of the artist's frustrated flirtation with the film industry is likely to find a sympathetic audience here.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The American Cinematheque celebrates Halloween from Friday through Sunday at the Egyptian Theatre with "Black Cats and Haunted Castles: Classics of Japanese Horror and the Supernatural," which features a number of cult items but kicks off with some major films by big directors. The series opens Friday with a knockout double feature, Kaneto Shindo's 1968 "Kuroneko" and Shiro Toyoda's 1969 "Portrait of Hell." In the first, a horde of samurai descends upon a hut in a carefully tended field.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
One day in Paris in 1955, during one of those charmed episodes that seem to fill the biographies of the famous, writer Andre Breton and filmmaker Luis Bunuel ran into each other on their way to visit playwright Eugene Ionesco. Bunuel had left the Surrealists years earlier but had remained friends with the fiery Breton.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to increase the visibility and awareness of classic Latin American film, a group of Los Angeles-based cinephiles has launched a nonprofit organization to screen Spanish-language movies. On Wednesday, the Latin-American Cinemateca of Los Angeles will present its inaugural screening, Luis Bunuel's 1952 film "El," a brilliant look at a man's psychotic jealousy, based on the novel by Spanish author Mercedes Pinto.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1996
Two rare Luis Bunuel films will screen tonight at 8:30 p.m. at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1928), which Bunuel co-directed with Jean Epstein, and "Daughter of Deceit" (1951) will be shown as part of the school's Friday night film series "Great Directors' Films Not Available on Video." The screenings will take place at the Art Center's Ahmanson Auditorium, 1700 Lida St. Admission is free. Information: (818) 396-2200.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Religion, specifically the Roman Catholic Church, has often been a touchstone for Luis Bunuel. What separates Bunuel from lesser directors is his ability to face personal questions about Roman Catholicism directly, without resorting to either simple-minded reverence or snide superiority.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"Little Ashes" is a trifling historical fantasy, gossip wrapped in gossamer, beautiful to watch but it takes only a light wind to leave the story in tatters. The setting is an imaginary Madrid, circa 1922. The Catholic Church and the intellectuals are locked in a battle for the Spanish soul. At the university, ideas and emotions are roiling the lives of three friends, the esoteric is debated in bedrooms and bars over massive quantities of alcohol.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Milos Forman, Academy Award-winning director of "Amadeus" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," will direct "Valmont," an adaptation of the novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos. Jean-Claude Carriere, who has worked with director Luis Bunuel and on the coming film, "Unbearable Lightness of Being," will write the screenplay. Paul Rassam will produce the film, which is slated to begin shooting in France next spring with an American and English cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
When he was younger, Rouben Mamoulian, who died on Friday at the age of 90, used to be annoyed that people thought he was older than he was. He had begun very young, giving acting classes in his native Tiflis, Russia, when he was only 20, directing his first play in London at 24, beginning work in the U.S. at 25, directing the drama "Porgy" (from which came "Porgy and Bess") on Broadway at 29.
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